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Unreasonable expectations of a teacher?

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by DaB66, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. Just had a great evening at a Rock Challenge event with excellent performance by the kids. Really grateful for the efforts of the teachers who spent all the time on developing the routine etc.



    However I was very unimpressed by the content of a conversation a different teacher had during the interval. I think it was an ex pupil who's sister had been performing and the sister (a pupil) was present.



    The teacher who is a HoD was saying how he was basically doing two jobs as xxxxx was on maternity leave. Then went on to relay stories about being drinking beers and being '******'.

    I think teachers have the right to enjoy their private lives how they wish but felt it was inappropriate to have that conversation in front of a pupil even though it was in the evening outside of school. He was there representing the school and wearing a school logo'd shirt which feels like it should make a difference.



    Is it unreasonable to expect a teacher to modify their behaviour to the extent of watching what they say when they have given up their evening to help out with a school event?
     
  2. Just had a great evening at a Rock Challenge event with excellent performance by the kids. Really grateful for the efforts of the teachers who spent all the time on developing the routine etc.



    However I was very unimpressed by the content of a conversation a different teacher had during the interval. I think it was an ex pupil who's sister had been performing and the sister (a pupil) was present.



    The teacher who is a HoD was saying how he was basically doing two jobs as xxxxx was on maternity leave. Then went on to relay stories about being drinking beers and being '******'.

    I think teachers have the right to enjoy their private lives how they wish but felt it was inappropriate to have that conversation in front of a pupil even though it was in the evening outside of school. He was there representing the school and wearing a school logo'd shirt which feels like it should make a difference.



    Is it unreasonable to expect a teacher to modify their behaviour to the extent of watching what they say when they have given up their evening to help out with a school event?
     
  3. AdmiralNelson

    AdmiralNelson New commenter

    So you'll be prepared to pay for teachers to run extra-curricular activities, trips etc. then? Because sniping at teachers who volunteer will erode goodwill just as fast as Gove's **** does.
     
  4. GeeMarie

    GeeMarie New commenter

    I see what you're saying- not that teachers should be on guard ALL THE TIME, but when they are behaving as teachers at a school function. I don't think that's unreasonable, why is everyone getting so angry?
    I have volunteered myself at many events both as a teaching assistant and a trainee teacher, and will continue to do so one I qualify. I don't find this post snipey at all. When I am with my students, whether or not I may know one or two of them personally, I conduct myself in a professional manner. Why wouldn't you? The last thing I want is any of the students hearing about my personal life, so I keep that sort of talk for staff-only or outside of school contexts. I don't think that's an unreasonable expectation at all. I am also not, before anyone is catty enough to suggest it, the sort of person who dobs someone in for doing so. I might disapprove, but it's my decision to keep shtum and theirs to discuss their weekend exploits within earshot of parents and students. I do think if you are overheard by a parent or senior member of staff you should accept the consequences though. By volunteering at an event such as that you agree to continue your professional role into the evening. You wouldn't talk about it in front of parents at an Open Evening, would you? Then how is that any different?
    When you are out and about in your own free time away from your professional duties, that's different. If you happen to be in town and a parent or senior member of staff hears you talking about your drinking exploits, you're well within your rights to be talking about it then and I doubt anyone would bat an eyelid. But a school function is a different matter.
     
  5. AdmiralNelson

    AdmiralNelson New commenter

    Well bully for you. IMHO when the day in, day out grind of teaching hits, you may find this rather a naive statement...and you may find fewer & fewer prepared to run extra events...
    Actually the the OP said this;
    Is it unreasonable to expect a teacher to modify their behaviour to the extent of watching what they say when they have given up their evening to help out with a school event?
    To which I, as a teacher of more than 30 years, say 'yes it is unreasonable'.
     
  6. No, absolutely not. I totally disagree with the above posters. If the person is on site at a school event, they are representing the school and should therefore act professionally at all times. If I were you I would have been concerned as well.
     
  7. GeeMarie

    GeeMarie New commenter


    Clearly this patronising reply shows I've offended you. Perhaps it is naive, only I will be able to say so with hindsight. Perhaps you've forgotten your own teacher training, but despite having a smaller timetable I'm still incredibly busy. It's not exactly a lie on the beach. I work hard and I do my bit. I also know a lot of other teachers, who have taught for as long as you in some cases, who volunteer and maintain professionalism. I'm not suggesting everyone is happy about it, but events need people if they are to continue. I don't see what is so difficult about not discussing your private life with students or parents for a couple of hours. No one is saying don't do it outside of work, but that is what events are- work. You wouldn't discuss it in the school day either. They're still students, you're still their teacher. So why shouldn't you be expected to act accordingly?
     
  8. Surely as professionals we have an obligation to maintain a professional attitude whenever we are with pupils, be that in or out of school hours. The basis of our job is to be respectable adults that our pupils can look up to and respect. That doesn't mean that we have to be wet sponges, but it does mean we have to act appropriately. I volunteer for many extra curricular activities, including being rock challenge organiser and during these events i keep the same attitude as i would during a teaching day. I'm sure you wouldn't discuss your drinking antics and proclaim you were '******' with your young children or friends/families children so why is it acceptable to do so with your pupils? I'm a very open guy and will answer most questions asked by pupils honestly, although i understand there is a boundary and this doesn't change depending on my setting! So in answer, yes i think you're right to have these exceptions, paid or not, that is their job!
     

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