1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Unit 3b Helping plants grow well

Discussion in 'Primary' started by mbc11, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. I'm looking for some advice on science unit 3b. I am an NQT about 2 embark on my 2nd half term. I'm in the process of planning my science for the half term but I seem to have all the objectives covered with weeks to spare.
    We have science all afternoon on a Wednesday so that will be 14 hourly sessions. I have planned the following:
    <u>Wk 1:</u> - (1st half) identifying prior knowledge/ learning the parts of a plant, labelling and writing about the job if each part.
    (2nd half) Celery demonstration to show children how the roots carry water, children to draw a picture of their observations and a brief explanation.
    <u>Wk 2:</u> - Introducing a science experiment, investigating how plants need water to grow. Children write about what we are going to do. What will we record? Plant the seeds.
    <u>Wk 3: -</u> (1st half) What happens if a plant has no light, discuss physical differences. Why does it need light to grow?
    (2nd half) How plants provide food for humans and animals/ food chains.
    <u>Wk 4: </u>- Record the results of our investigation started 2 weeks ago. Discuss results.

    This leaves me with 3 weeks and 6 hours to fill. EEEK!! I've checked the L.O's and I'm sure I have covered them all. Any ideas for things I may have missed or be able to expand on.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. I'm looking for some advice on science unit 3b. I am an NQT about 2 embark on my 2nd half term. I'm in the process of planning my science for the half term but I seem to have all the objectives covered with weeks to spare.
    We have science all afternoon on a Wednesday so that will be 14 hourly sessions. I have planned the following:
    <u>Wk 1:</u> - (1st half) identifying prior knowledge/ learning the parts of a plant, labelling and writing about the job if each part.
    (2nd half) Celery demonstration to show children how the roots carry water, children to draw a picture of their observations and a brief explanation.
    <u>Wk 2:</u> - Introducing a science experiment, investigating how plants need water to grow. Children write about what we are going to do. What will we record? Plant the seeds.
    <u>Wk 3: -</u> (1st half) What happens if a plant has no light, discuss physical differences. Why does it need light to grow?
    (2nd half) How plants provide food for humans and animals/ food chains.
    <u>Wk 4: </u>- Record the results of our investigation started 2 weeks ago. Discuss results.

    This leaves me with 3 weeks and 6 hours to fill. EEEK!! I've checked the L.O's and I'm sure I have covered them all. Any ideas for things I may have missed or be able to expand on.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated.
     
  3. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    Have you looked at the standards site plans for 3b and checked that there is nothing there that you have missed out?
    http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20100612050234/http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/schemes2/science/sci3b/sci3bq11?view=get
    Do you intend to use any ICT? Are there opportunties to record and present results using a suitable program? Are you are using any interactive programs?
    It's great to see that you intend to lots of practical work!
    When I did plants with year 5 I found this site really helpful - there are activities on it for all age groups:
    http://www-saps.plantsci.cam.ac.uk/
    Have a look here too:
    http://www.scienceweb.org.uk/resSite95301/html/f_3b.htm



     
  4. Ah! My specialist subject!
    Grow some veg outdoors (even if it's some lettuce seeds sown in buckets of compost). Have some in the shade and some in the sunshine. Which grows best?
    Get outdoors and go on a bug hunt. What did you find? Discuss birds...... what do they eat? Not just seeds but bugs too. Get them to think about caterpillars. Caterpillars will eat your lettuce. So we could spray them with insecticide. But if we do that, what will the birds eat? Plus if we don't have any caterpillars, how will we ever have any gorgeous butterflies? Think organic - if we want to get rid of pesky insects, we need to attract more birds (make some suet bird seed cakes)
    Do plants need water to grow? - get yourself a bulb from the garden centre. Most will still grow if placed on a windowsill (with no soil or water). But for how long? Why are they growing (discuss water being in the bulb).
    You can expand on the light..... what COLOUR light do plants need? get some different coloured acetate (Blue, Green, and Red) (or different coloured fizzy pop bottles). roll the acetates into cylinders and put each one around a different young plant ( you can get small tomato plants in the garden centre now). The one covered with blue won't grow. The green and red ones will. The control with natural light will be best. Plants tend to need light in the green and red frequencies.
    You could try covering up the grass outside in a pattern of cardboard cut outs (like your class' name). Leave for a week and then remove it - you'll have a patterned lawn!
    Some plants are grown without light - rhubarb is 'forced' to make it paler and more tender. Rhubarb crumble anyone? What about mushrooms (i.e. they grow in the dark but are they are plant?)
    You could change the celery for some white carnations - using food dye you can make different coloured flowers (they actually do this in the flower industry for some funny coloured chrysanthemums.
    Something that the children always love is if I get a load of different fruit (some familiar and some exotic). See if the children can name them all (dragonfruit is always a tricky one!). Where are the seeds? How many do they think there are? How big? What shape?. Then cut them open and find out! Lots of fruit for the kids to try too (with parental permission obviously!). Remember to include cucumbers, butternut squash, tomatoes and peppers as these are fruit too - this can sometimes be a revelation for adults as well as children. A fruit is the part of the plant that contains the seeds. A strawberry is a false fruit - the seeds are on the outside of it!
    Is there room for the class to have their own veg patch?
     
  5. There isn't really any grass at all because I had looked into the idea of covering some grass with carboard. For the veg patch there is 1 or 2 areas of soil I would have to check if we are able to plant their, because I think they are just starting these up and have planted flowers there already.
    Thanks for the ideas so far.
     
  6. I have a space outside my classroom and we have about 10 buckets filled with compost. That's where we grow stuff.
    You can get some grass seed and grow a tray of grass - it doesn't have to be grown in the soil outside. The kids love giving it haircuts as it grows (one of the few plants that grow from the base, not the top, hence why you can cut it)
     
  7. forestje

    forestje New commenter

    I give mine a tiny geranium plug plant to grow.They have to find out how to look after it and the best growing conditions.They also take home a plant diary to fill in.
     
  8. I like the idea of the plant diary. I was thinking of growing sunflowers for the experiment. Does anyone know how long they take to grow, not full length obviously but a reasonable amount so that we can measure growth? I considered cress but a sunflower is so much better to look at.
     
  9. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Lead commenter

    why not grow cress or mustard on egg boxes and blotting paper ot tissue?
    Runner beans in jam jars with beans jammed against wall of jar and they can watch them grow and record
    tests on deprivation o light, heat,water etc to eanable to see the effects.
     

Share This Page