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Typical British Parents Abroad

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Elohim, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. I work at an international school in the Czech Republic. We have
    pupils from all over the world. Guess which group of parents keep their
    children off school when it's snowing? That's right - you guessed it - the Brits.
    Everyone else attends school, and there's no significant absences from any other group.
    Furthermore, the country continues running just fine - and our Slavic snow is much
    heavier, denser and longer lasting than British snow. Nothing closes -
    and everything continues to operate at the same speeds/ timing as in normal conditions. But that
    doesn't stop the Brits from complaining and staying home.
    Significant differences in behaviour of British parents are also evident on rain days, where arrival times to school are reduced compared to maintained normal patterns of parents of other nationalities. Admittedly, traffic speeds are decreased, but non-British parents compensate by departing from home at earlier times.
    And don't get me started on academic standards and homework submission where Brits are outperformed by South-East Asian students, and are observably lower in effort exertion.


     
  2. I work at an international school in the Czech Republic. We have
    pupils from all over the world. Guess which group of parents keep their
    children off school when it's snowing? That's right - you guessed it - the Brits.
    Everyone else attends school, and there's no significant absences from any other group.
    Furthermore, the country continues running just fine - and our Slavic snow is much
    heavier, denser and longer lasting than British snow. Nothing closes -
    and everything continues to operate at the same speeds/ timing as in normal conditions. But that
    doesn't stop the Brits from complaining and staying home.
    Significant differences in behaviour of British parents are also evident on rain days, where arrival times to school are reduced compared to maintained normal patterns of parents of other nationalities. Admittedly, traffic speeds are decreased, but non-British parents compensate by departing from home at earlier times.
    And don't get me started on academic standards and homework submission where Brits are outperformed by South-East Asian students, and are observably lower in effort exertion.


     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Oddly enough in my school (in the UK) it is Polish parents who seem the most concerned by the weather. I was very surprised to find thick woolly tights under the boys trousers from September onwards (when changing for PE) is this usual?
     
  4. Yes, I have seen the same with Czech pupils. Boys often wear something underneather: leg warmers/ tights/ leggings - or whatever they're called.
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Odd considering our boys were wearing shorts because the weather was so mild
     
  6. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    They're bred tough round these parts.
     
  7. marymoocow

    marymoocow Star commenter

    I've had polish boys wearing tights too. They sometimes wear them all year around. Also chinese children seem to wear lots of layers. One worried parent kept asking us to make sure the child was well wrapped up as she would feel the cold more, despite being born in the UK. Even in the heat of summer, she has 2 pairs of tights, then footless leggings on top under her skirt and a long sleved top and vest under her school shirt.
     

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