1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Tutoring KS2 when not specialist?

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by sweetangel, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. I have a question for the primary tutors. I know and have seen a lot of tutors that are secondary teachers in a non maths, english, science related subject yet now tutor primary as their main side income.
    What do you think of this? I'm a languages teacher but from my ads I get countless people asking me if I tutor English, Maths, Science..lol, it clearly states which subjects I teach.
    I wanted to now how or if at all to venture into this type of tutoring, probably English to start off with I think as have higher qualifications in this but not in Maths and Science.
    How do these non specialists start out?
     
  2. I have a question for the primary tutors. I know and have seen a lot of tutors that are secondary teachers in a non maths, english, science related subject yet now tutor primary as their main side income.
    What do you think of this? I'm a languages teacher but from my ads I get countless people asking me if I tutor English, Maths, Science..lol, it clearly states which subjects I teach.
    I wanted to now how or if at all to venture into this type of tutoring, probably English to start off with I think as have higher qualifications in this but not in Maths and Science.
    How do these non specialists start out?
     
  3. Typhoon

    Typhoon New commenter

    I think it comes down to what you mean by the term 'non specialist'. I am trained as a secondary English teacher, however I also tutor English at KS1 and KS2 (although I do have lots of primary supply experience) and I tutor in maths from KS1 right through to GCSE.
    At the end of the day, you are a teacher, and that means that you can be employed in any educational establishment, teaching any subject to any age group that the headteacher and governers believe you are capable of. It is worth remembering that many teachers in secondary schools often find that at least some percentage of their time-table is comprised of them teaching 'non-specialist' subjects.
    I think as long as you feel confident and capable of teaching a subject, there is no reason why you shouldn't be able to tutor it, although you may need to spend a little time looking up resources and looking at the relevant curriculum first, to get an idea what you should be focusing on. If you feel most confident with English, perhaps start with that. Good luck.

     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    One of the advantages of being primary trained and having a lot of experience as a primary teacher is that I have a very good knowledge of the methods and vocabulary used in a primary classroom. I understand the way maths is taught and the common misconceptions at that age which I personally think is a real advantage. I also understand the age related expectations for writing, spelling and reading. I offer GCSE maths and science based on my scientific background but I don't offer English past KS2 because I have limited experience in this area.
    Primary is not as easy as many people think - there is a lot of skills and understanding needed.
     
  5. I agree, I've had a tutor for my four year old, but she isn't primary trained and has really struggled to keep him stimulated!
    Any ideas of where I could find a good tutor in the West London area?
     
  6. I'm primary trained and tutor numeracy and literacy, but also tutor maths to GCSE level due to my degree.
    As long as you're trained then you are trained to teach any level. I agree with the comment above though, presenting and teaching GCSE is very different to primary - you need to be a lot more imaginative with your teaching.
    I also tutor a 4 year old for phonics and this again is very different from teaching primary!
    I suggest that it is possible, but you need to have a general idea about the curriculum in these areas, and a little imagination!
    You never know - you might even prefer it, but I definately find tutoring primary more demanding in terms of resources needed etc.
    Good luck
     
  7. Whatever you decide, remember that you are risking your reputation!
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I'm primary trained but I have a very strong maths and science background so I offer GCSE Maths and Science as well as KS2 English and Maths. Most of my clients are GCSE Maths - some are doing A-level Maths next year so will have to get swotting.
    I have worked in KS1 but to be honest, I think tutoring at that age (and especially a 4 year old) is a bit much. After a hard day at school or on a busy weekend, there is no way they could do an hour of work 1-1. And just doing 1/2 hr is not worth it. Plus I just think a 4 year old is too young for extra work!!!

     
  9. Hi - I was browsing the forum as I teach in primary school (Reception age) and tutor up to common entrance...i am also in West London and have had 15 years of teaching/tutoring experience with no complaints. If you're still looking for a tutor, please get in touch!

     
  10. I agree. I mentioned these concerns before I started tutoring him but mum still insisted he be tutored alongside his other brothers. I only tutor him for 20 mins though as I didn't think he's be able to cope with much more and tend to do fun games and use lots of pictures!
     

  11. OK I don't normally do this because typos are so easy but ................

    "I wanted to now how or if at all to venture into this type of tutoring,
    probably English to start off with I think as have higher qualifications
    in this but not in Maths and Science."
    Not sure I'd like you tutoring English if this is your general standard
     

Share This Page