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Tutoring during the holidays.

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by angiebabe, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. angiebabe

    angiebabe Occasional commenter

    Do you tutor during the holidays?
    I really don't want to because I only do 2 hours a week I feel like myself and the children need a break from each other. I want to feel re-charged and eager again but at the moment it has become something of a hard slog with one child in particular. And this particular child's mum wants me to still come for an hour a week. Its a 20mins journey, which is not so far, but he is really very unresponsive most of the time and I want a rest from his sullen little face and strange answers (he always wants to come out with ridiculous stuff, can't think of an example at the moment).
    I've said I will go but does anyone have any suggestions how I can make this hourly session more enjoyable?
     
  2. angiebabe

    angiebabe Occasional commenter

    Do you tutor during the holidays?
    I really don't want to because I only do 2 hours a week I feel like myself and the children need a break from each other. I want to feel re-charged and eager again but at the moment it has become something of a hard slog with one child in particular. And this particular child's mum wants me to still come for an hour a week. Its a 20mins journey, which is not so far, but he is really very unresponsive most of the time and I want a rest from his sullen little face and strange answers (he always wants to come out with ridiculous stuff, can't think of an example at the moment).
    I've said I will go but does anyone have any suggestions how I can make this hourly session more enjoyable?
     
  3. Try to introduce more games, puzzles, even hands-on movement activities, and see how they work.
    I suspect he resents having extra tuition, which must seem a bit of a nuisance when he'd prefer exercising his thumbs on his Playstation or bouncing on a trampoline. Don't give up on him yet, though . (Unless his mum stops paying ) Explain to him exactly the point of having the knowledge and skills which you're trying to teach him, praise him fulsomely for good work and progress, but don't hesitate to tell his mother if he's being deliberately sullen and obstructive .
    After hundreds of lessons and dozens of students, I've only had one like this, who resented me completely revising a GCSE English coursework essay (which was frankly s hit for a grammar school boy from a well-off family). He didn't even bother coming home in time for the second session. His mother was furious, but I was still paid for turning up, and I soon found a more willing customer.Good luck.
    By the way, how old is this child, and which subject do you teach him?
     
  4. angiebabe

    angiebabe Occasional commenter

    Thanks for all the advice bob
    The boy is 8 and will be going into yr5 in sept. Yes he does resent me being there. I teach him Literacy but I am stumped when it comes to finding things he enjoys to talk about or do. I was thinking of a some kind of project but I don't think that is going to work. His mum has spoken to him in the past about his attitude but she is very pushy in that kind of 'softly spoken mummy's boy type of tone' if you understand what I mean. He has made very good progress as far as his school is concerned during the time I have been tutoring him but I am puzzled as to how sometimes because of the lack of effort he puts in with me.
    Oh don't worry about the praise - I have done that in abundance but I'm still finding it mighty hard.
     
  5. Just keep making the effort so you get paid every time you go. And try not to take it personally, which is easier said than done.
     
  6. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    It's nothing you're doing-primary boys are so much harder to tutor than girls. When I first started tutoring, I only had boys as clients. It was difficult because they were so unresponsive and the progress was slow and painful. I had one little boy who was year three, I found his behaviour disrespectful and he kept messing around in sessions. I felt I was managing his behaviour much more than teaching him. He was a bright boy, but alot of time was wasted in the sessions as he treated them like a joke. Thankfully, the clients didn't renew after the Summer break! I tutored him for a year and half and he didn't even know my name!
    Since then I've had alot more girls as clients and the difference is unbelievable - though I still get the not doing homework etc.
    I have a book which I use to teach literacy skills - they're short activities and the children enjoy doing them. I tend to do one of these, and then focus on comprehension.
    Remember, children behave differently with tutors, and it's a completely different relationship to the one you would have with them in class. Primary tutoring in English is probably the hardest to tutor as you are teaching the foundations to reading and writing a hour a week- not long when you think about the colossal amount of knowledge and skills they need to become fluent readers and writers.
    Keep up the sessions until his parents end them. You're always going to encounter children like him as a tutor and you'll learn to ignore it after a while.
     
  7. Spiderwomen

    Would you please let me know the book you use to teach literacy skills? I have my first session with a year 3 girl tomorrow and thus far I have only tutored year 9 upwards.

    Many thanks.
     
  8. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    I've sent you a private message. Check your inbox.
     
  9. Keep up the sessions until his parents end them. You're always going to encounter children like him as a tutor and you'll learn to ignore it after a while.[​IMG]
     
  10. Spiderwomen I would be very interested in the book you use to teach literacy skills? As a I a primary teacher, but have just started tutoring primary children to gain some extra money
     
  11. spiderwomen I would also be really grateful to know which Literacy book you are using. Thanks.
     
  12. Spiderwoman, I'd also be really interested in the name of the book you used for Literacy. Many thanks.
     
  13. YES! Why not build in a FUN ACTIVITY towards the end - as a reward - how old is the sullen little fellow? Like a wordsearch or DOT TO DOT depends on age of course!!! This used to go down a treat with one or two of the more difficult ones I have taught In the past!!!!
     
  14. Spiderwoman, I'd LOVE to find out what book you were using to teach Literacy. I teach 12 sessions per week which was always just Maths but for some reason loads of them have wanted me to switch to Literacy over the past few months. All my Literacy books and planning is geared towards classroom style ie an hour every day rather than once a week. I would LOVE to have a book that I could just pick up and use!!!
     

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