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Trying to get a teaching job in New Zealand, what am I doing wrong?

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by HarveyTree, Nov 16, 2011.

  1. I totally agree - the CV may be the killer here - very very American. Things like GPA etc just really don't have much relevance when you are applying for teaching jobs in NZ - you also may come across as 'showing off' which is a national sin!
     
  2. Sorry - also just re-read your CV - you are fairly newly-qualified, which also may be putting off schools. Social Studies in NZ is very NZ-centric, and there was talk (I don't know if it went through or not, they were debating over July or so) of every High School teacher having to be able to take Maori as well, which will be hard for you.
    This is already compulsory for primary teachers.
     
  3. Once again, the lack of a 'like' button is frustrating.
    Cruel, sidinz, cruel, but very funny. And for a bird, too!
    The easy way is to write a CV c.1950s and the job will be yours!
    [​IMG]

     
  4. MrDoc

    MrDoc New commenter

    Don't forget to mention that you own a Morris Oxford. Clive James has a lot to answer for
     
  5. I suppose I just got a bit sick of his blaming everyone but himself for his inability to get a job. I'm in pretty much the same boat he is - too many fixed-term jobs making my CV look a bit flaky.
    Only I acknowledge that my own naivete and consequent poor decision making are to blame and don't keep coming on here b!tching about all the schools that won't give me a chance and giving other people tainted advice because of it.
     
  6. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    And I thought it was just me!
    I'm sure there are many teachers who have come through the last 15 years with plenty of short term contracts on their CV. Mainly a simpton of the system in place in the UK and of course the working practice overseas. Frustrating of course and, to the ill-informed, it does understandably look as if we are unable to stick it out in one school relative to another applicant, when maybe only a marginal no at that first school interview is the difference between us, despite your self confessed contribution to your predicament.
    Have a peep on some other forums when you get the chance. There are many NQT's struggling to even get a day of supply, kids who see their hopes fading of even an opportunity. Something that shouldn't be forgotten by anyone in work.
     
  7. [​IMG]
     
  8. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    I'm really not sure at all why anyone would think a NZ school would look to give a non NZ national a job. The international market has grown due to the need for English language speaking schools overseas and the importance of English as a language. Both points are irrelevant in NZ and one would expect there are a decent number of NZ nationals out of work and seeking employment there.
    I know foreign nationals get work in London schools, yet I'd suggest that is because the general population don't want to work in those schools and as such it opens the door to foreign applicants.
     
  9. percy topliss

    percy topliss Occasional commenter

    For the OP. Are World History and World Geography anything like History and Geography that the rest of the teaching world teach? I think that this may have something to do with your applications being torpedoed. New Zealand may be small but it is not small minded.

    P
     
  10. polly.glot

    polly.glot New commenter

    The primary service seems to be at saturation point, with many young teachers struggling for work. My son (primary trained) applied for a job in Wellington 18 months ago, and was in competition with more than 200 applicants. Anyone with IB or CIE experience seems to be well-placed for work, but of course, only in secondary.
     
  11. NZ is NOT short of teachers at the moment. This is across all areas. Despite what people say there are a lot if IB trained teachers here. That includes PYP trained, MYP trained and IB for the secondary programme. NZ prefers teachers with experience over new teachers and then our own new teachers over overseas new teachers. Sorry but the UK is very much the same for us as NZ is for you. I wouldn't head to Chch, there is really not a lot going on there.
    Sorry if this is unhelpful but it is factual and from a teacher currently working in NZ.
     

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