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Treated like a potential criminal, when on supply?

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by albertdog, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. Looking at a thread on the Personal site got me to thinking about the ways supply teachers are treated by schools. I am out of the game permanently now, but, eighteen months ago, I remember being offered three days work at a school through an agency, which I accepted. I then got an e-mail detailing the lessons I would be teaching and the initials of the member of staff who would be observing four out of the five lessons. In addition, I was asked to e-mail detailed lesson plans for each lesson in advance (this was Friday morning for the work to start on the following Manday) as well as copies of two SOWs, which I had written. There was also a lot of 'guff' about as I did not have the school's CRB clearance, I would have to chaperonned around the school. As work was short, I e-mailed my lesson plans, which, I assume were not considered good enough, as the booking was cancelled, early on Monday morning.
    I have heard people complain about being treated like a criminal by schools, and not just with regard to children but with adults too, who surely are old enough to look out for themselves. Having to ask permission to use the lavatory from the designated key holder, and to be escorted to and from the facilities, springs to mind
    For three days work! Good grief!
     
  2. Looking at a thread on the Personal site got me to thinking about the ways supply teachers are treated by schools. I am out of the game permanently now, but, eighteen months ago, I remember being offered three days work at a school through an agency, which I accepted. I then got an e-mail detailing the lessons I would be teaching and the initials of the member of staff who would be observing four out of the five lessons. In addition, I was asked to e-mail detailed lesson plans for each lesson in advance (this was Friday morning for the work to start on the following Manday) as well as copies of two SOWs, which I had written. There was also a lot of 'guff' about as I did not have the school's CRB clearance, I would have to chaperonned around the school. As work was short, I e-mailed my lesson plans, which, I assume were not considered good enough, as the booking was cancelled, early on Monday morning.
    I have heard people complain about being treated like a criminal by schools, and not just with regard to children but with adults too, who surely are old enough to look out for themselves. Having to ask permission to use the lavatory from the designated key holder, and to be escorted to and from the facilities, springs to mind
    For three days work! Good grief!
     
  3. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    I started my current job after the October half term and will be there for the rest of the year. It was the best part of ten weeks before I got a room key.

    In another school I was covering for the Head of ICT for a week, and have been a subject specialist for over twenty years. The miserable sods didn't give me a network login. I took my own cruddy old laptop in with a projector cable and used that.
     
  4. It seems silly to have someone observing most of a supply teacher's lessons..
     
  5. I just thought I'd pipe up and say I'm sorry to hear you've has such negative experiences Albertdog.

    The school I'm in at the moment have been lovely. I was given a key to the dept office on my second or third day, and have my own computer login. I haven't been observed (but the other depts teachers might pop in to get something from the classroom briefly) and apart from being told (on Wednesday morning) that the kids were being a bit too loud (which has been sorted now) it's been a positive experience and I'm quite looking forward to my next two weeks there!
     
  6. les25paul

    les25paul Star commenter

    I had that happen to me once, a single day's work in a new school and I was observed for, at least part, of every lesson. I think that they were checking people out for an upcoming long term supply the following term. Not that I was interested I was already sorted for that period.
    Still a day's pay for me though, which was all I wanted.
     
  7. Georgia99

    Georgia99 New commenter

    I have never heard of a school observing a supply teacher for 4 out of 5 lessons. Normally supply teachers fill in as there are no other staff so if there are staff who are free to observe cover teachers then they might as well take the lessons.
    I wouldn't be suprised if they wanted a sow and some lesson plans writing for them and used this as a way to get some 'free' work done for them. Sceptical I know but it wouldn't suprise me if they are using your plans now.
     
  8. The typical behaviour of malign bullies with over inflated egos and self-importance!
    Such people need to be put FIRMLY IN PLACE!
     
  9. emmadrg

    emmadrg New commenter

    The only time I've had someone observe one of my lessons on supply was when I was up for potential long-term work.
    And I've never had to send detailed lesson plans in, although for one I was told to do a lesson on a specific thing, sort of like an interview lesson.
    Sounds utterly preposterous that a school would demand all that for a three-day booking.
     
  10. The point of not being given a room key is that it makes the cover supervisor, who you have to ask to let you into the room look much more efficient than you do in the eyes of the students.
    Similarly, not having a guest login on the computer system means that you cannot do the class register straight into SIMS. This often meant passing a piece of paper around, because the school could not get off their backsides and give you a class list, and then crossing out all the Ben Dovers, Phil Mcaffertys and Michael Hunts before sending the register off to the reception. The purpose is you end up looking inept rather than the favoured CSs who have complete access to everything a teacher should have apart from a living wage.
    Often the school could not give you a class list because at the last moment the classes are switched around because a permanent teacher sacrifices themselves to take the top set, you were scheduled to take, to give you their bottom set where you can't do much damage.
     
  11. les25paul

    les25paul Star commenter

    Very popular names there seems to be at least one student of each name in every class plus, of course, Ivor son of Mr and Mrs Biggun.[​IMG]
    I must admit to finding it mildly assuming but wish that they could come up with a new one, (mind you I still laugh at Carry on films). What's even funnier is the horrified looks on their faces when you don't cross the names off before sending the register off to reception.[​IMG]
     

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