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Treated like a dogsbody

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by robyn147, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. I have been doing 1-1 at a school for the last year. It's been on 10 week blocks and I will ending this block this term. It's only a day a week but it's reliable income on top of other tutoring work. They do not need me next term "as they've not got anymore students to do" but will / may need me in the new academic year as the new year 7's arrive.
    I love tutoring but get really tired of the short termism and lack of certainty from term to term. And it really annoys me when you get told that you will be needed but not quite yet. I get no sick pay, only get paid per hour and have no job security. Yet the Government wants failing pupils to get extra support. Where are the decent jobs then to do this? I am an intelligent, well qualified teacher who just happens to be quite good at 1-1 (much better than being a class teacher in some respects although I do miss having a class). It is great seeing the progress children make and the enjoyment they get from achieving - but the security and benefits are ****.

     
  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I have been doing 1-1 at a school for the last year. It's been on 10 week blocks and I will ending this block this term. It's only a day a week but it's reliable income on top of other tutoring work. They do not need me next term "as they've not got anymore students to do" but will / may need me in the new academic year as the new year 7's arrive.
    I love tutoring but get really tired of the short termism and lack of certainty from term to term. And it really annoys me when you get told that you will be needed but not quite yet. I get no sick pay, only get paid per hour and have no job security. Yet the Government wants failing pupils to get extra support. Where are the decent jobs then to do this? I am an intelligent, well qualified teacher who just happens to be quite good at 1-1 (much better than being a class teacher in some respects although I do miss having a class). It is great seeing the progress children make and the enjoyment they get from achieving - but the security and benefits are ****.

     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Sorry you're feeling a little 'used' robyn. I'm afraid it's a feeling all too common among supplies, where it's not the job but the uncertainty, short-term nature & no benefit of seeing real progress which spoils the job.
    A word of warning too,.Talking to a 1-1 teacher at a school where I do regular supply, I've heard 1-1 funding may not be continuing in the future & 'was never intended to be a long term measure' her words not mine!
     
  4. Typhoon

    Typhoon New commenter

    Robyn, I do know exactly how you feel regarding the uncertainity of one-to-one work. Between September and December I was working as a one-to-one tutor at a local primary school, going in two afternoons per week. When I was initially booked, I was told by the head-teacher that the work would last the autumn term in the first instance then possibly extend into the spring term as there were up to 8 children in total who required tutoring (I managed to tutor 4 of them during the autumn.) A couple of weeks before the Christmas holidays, I e-mailed the teacher (as I never managed to catch him when in school) just to enquire whether he would require my services after Christmas or not so that I could organise myself and make decisions as regards to potential future work - I combine supply teaching with private tutoring. He replied that he was meeting with the Year 6 teacher that week to discuss and would get back to me. He never did!
    Obviously, 4 weeks into the spring term I presume that my services are not required and I am imagining due to funding. I know that the Year 6 teacher was very pleased with my work and the progress the children made, so it's not something I'm taking personally, just put it down to poor organisation / communication on the school's part. I would have far preferred though a straight yes or no answer though! So I sympathise with your situation, Robyn, and know exactly how frustrating it can be when you don't know where you are regarding work. My policy now is not to 'wait' for schools - if something more definite comes up meanwhile when a school is uncertain or can't confirm whether they will need me or not, I take the guaranteed offer. In these times, I think we really do have to look after ourselves first.
     

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