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Treasure hunts for nursery children

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by kookins, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. Hi all!
    Has anybody got any good stimuli for nursery treasure hunts? I want to focus on positional language and hopefully incorporate some thing from the 'ourselves' theme.... am in one of those situations where the more you think about it the more you hit a wall and have a mind blank!!!
    Thank you to anyone who is kind enough to respond to my deperate plea!!!
    x
     
  2. Hi all!
    Has anybody got any good stimuli for nursery treasure hunts? I want to focus on positional language and hopefully incorporate some thing from the 'ourselves' theme.... am in one of those situations where the more you think about it the more you hit a wall and have a mind blank!!!
    Thank you to anyone who is kind enough to respond to my deperate plea!!!
    x
     
  3. My nursery class last year loved treasure hunts!


    We did a pirate topic - all draw maps, made hats etc then went as a group on a treasure hunt around the school following picture clues (e.g. close ups of the climbing frame) that led up to a treasure chest with a little prize in for each child.


    The maps really inspired mark making (especially the boys)


    We also did safari hunts where I hid little laminated pictures of wild animals around the outside area for the children to find - they had clipboards, magnifying glasses, binoculars, and were asked if they could record how many lions, elephants etc they found - like a very simple tally.


    When we did Rosie's Walk we hid foxes all around the area and again asked them to tally how many they could find.


    Hope this gives you a few ideas
     
  4. Hope the two links below are of some help to you,
    http://primarytreasurechest.com/we-are-going-on-a-hunt.html
    http://primarytreasurechest.com/topics/at-the-seaside/pirates.html
    If you have any requests, please just contact us through the site.
     
  5. If you are looking to get positional language out of your children (or 'put it in') I would suggest playing 'hide and seek' in a small area, with a small group, with a teddy. You will have to hold them back from running to look for the teddy and get them to talk about where it might be so that they use positional vocabulary. You could move on from that to playing hide and seek in the outside area. Children's first instinct will always be to run and look rather than stop and discuss. You could have a hunt, but if so, you are asking for two skills - to interpret picture clues and to use positional language. I can see difficulties in combining those. With hide and seek you may be able to confine it to the positional language, hard enough for 3 year olds on its own. Maybe have the treasure hunt as well, so that children can find places within their environment - good for getting to know and explore their new surroundings.
     
  6. QuestionsQuestions

    QuestionsQuestions New commenter

    Rosie's walk is brilliant for positional language, laying out different items and using the language. We're going on a bear hunt is also very good and one that my class (of slightly older chn) loved.
     

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