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Too much negative thinking?

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by apmcarthur, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. Hey y'all,

    I'm wondering if from certain parties there's a little too much negativity going on about the changes in ICT?

    The future is uncertain.... We don't really know what it means for our futures.... Some say it's good, some say it's bad. Some say there'll be more specialist demand, some say schools will avoid it so there will be less....

    We don't know what's ahead but surely we can see the potential positives in all this? Surely Mr Give has highlighted the importance of our subject by highlighting it in this way and surely that can't be a bad thing...

    I think all signs are pointing towards a better quality 'ICT' being taught
     
  2. Hey y'all,

    I'm wondering if from certain parties there's a little too much negativity going on about the changes in ICT?

    The future is uncertain.... We don't really know what it means for our futures.... Some say it's good, some say it's bad. Some say there'll be more specialist demand, some say schools will avoid it so there will be less....

    We don't know what's ahead but surely we can see the potential positives in all this? Surely Mr Give has highlighted the importance of our subject by highlighting it in this way and surely that can't be a bad thing...

    I think all signs are pointing towards a better quality 'ICT' being taught
     
  3. djphillips1408

    djphillips1408 New commenter

    There are no changes, al Mr Gove wants is for us to do a bit more computing if we can. The future is certain, you just have more paths open to you and that's no bad thing.
     
  4. It's very nice to have you back, djp.



    I added a thread about this a while ago.



    Undoubtedly, in terms of overall employment, things in the ICT World aren't as rosy as they were a while ago - the EBacc thing is potentially a difficulty for us all.



    I certainly wouldn't choose this subject if I were starting out now.


    But there is nothing that we can do about it and it shouldn't be used as an excuse for ICT / OCR Nationals bashing and internecine squabbling prompted by the Computing Fringe (or should I call them the Computer Science' fringe now).

    Really could be worse.
     
  5. He does not want us to do just a bit more "computing if we can" he want the main areas of ICT to be farmed out to other departments. PHSE is take over intenet safety, history to take over information reliability. He wants CS is be a new subject at KS3 with fresh content, hopefully programming, networks, computer hardware, OSs. The attitude that we do not have to change anything is wrong and if the drive for CS fails we are likely to see ICT and CS gone and then we really we struggle for work.
     
  6. Ok... I am a worrier but no ict or computer science?

    Gove wants to take computer studies forward and your saying they could be none existent!?
     
  7. Gove does want to give computer science a go. But if departmenst do not raise to the challenge and the new CS departments are teaching the same stuff as now then he may just have ICT as a cross curricula subject. (I know some departments do a great job with a creative and interesting KS3, but a lot of others do not)
     
  8. Suspect this means the endlessly repeated Powerpoint / DTP / Word stuff.
     
  9. Many of the simple fnctioning skills like using powerpoint effectively can be done by other subjects while we concentrate on the more technical skills tha will inspire some students into going into the computer industry. The big issue do other subjects want the responsibility and will peupils be taught well. History has shown it does not work well as other subject want to teach tehir subject not IT
     
  10. djphillips1408

    djphillips1408 New commenter

    Really where on earth does it say that? Where on earth does he mention anything about farming out everything cross curricular? Where on earth does he say anything about computing science being the only thing left? Stop trying to scare people and read his speech. Besides if it does move towards CS then we have plenty of time to learn some simple programming. If you don't want to adjust a small section of *** you teach because you can be bothered then this is not the righ profession for you, no one is going o lose their job overnight because they currently don't teach programming
     
  11. He didn't say it, but the national curriculum review "expert panel" report does pretty much say ICT should go cross-curricular. However, I do agree that non-programmers shouldn't panic; I think the move to include more CS will be gradual and teachers willing to learn themselves will be fine. I think I few years from now we will have CS lessons and IT lessons co-existing as the RI report with "digital literacy" farmed out to other depts. I do think the term "ICT" (virtually unique to UK education) will disapear.
     
  12. I am getting a bit squiffy but my memory of that report was that it suggested or implied that digital literacy could be x-curr'r up to KS4 or did I get that wrong?
    The bigger threat is the EBac thing; if ICT isn't in that then it's dead; if the PTB (sorry, powers that be) introduce a requirement that Computing has academic rigour then it will be the only subject that does and will have shocking results.
    Over time that would kill our jobs if the PTB didn't pull out of the nosedive.

     
  13. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    My main concern is that HTs who've come to regard Core KS4 ICT as a nice convenient conveyor belt for grade C equivalence through MS Office proficiency courses will be reluctant to change anything. Given that in many schools the conveyor belt begins in Y9, it's only going to be in Y7 and Y8 that things will change for the better, then it's back to the grade C grindstone from Y9 onwards.

    I suppose the best we can hope for there is that the choice of KS4 Units changes, or broadens, or something, but some schools are bound to just stick with the tried (or should I say tired) and tested.
     

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