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To work as a consultant... or not?

Discussion in 'Career clinic' started by MrsMusgrove, Jun 30, 2016.

  1. MrsMusgrove

    MrsMusgrove New commenter

    I work as a teacher - part time. I have been offered a role as an advisor supporting other schools. I'm wondering if anyone else has done this and how they found it. I would still teach PT but would be giving up my days off (which are stay-at-home with children days) to do this. I'm very interested in the opportunity but just wanted the thoughts of others...
     
  2. And100

    And100 New commenter

    I've done a lot of advisory work and I love it. Work-life balance, the pace of the working day and being able to go to the loo when you want (I work with young children so this is a challenge) are advantages. The one thing I felt was missing after I'd done the job for a few years was current classroom experience. Teaching part time alongside consultancy work would solve this. I'd recommend it :)
     
    MrsMusgrove likes this.
  3. MrsMusgrove

    MrsMusgrove New commenter

    Thank you - that's really helpful. I'm very excited about it but I'm weighing everything up. My current role works around childcare and allows me to do school pick-ups. If I take this opportunity, I will have to arrange childcare for my under 5s.
     
  4. senlady

    senlady Senior commenter

    I work as a 'specialist teacher' which I am guessing is this sort of advisory role - I have done it 4 yrs and I have 3 smalls (now 8, 5 and 4). I travel between schools get to see lots of different and interesting things (and pinch ideas! :) ) I talk with all sorts of school staff and I get to work with multidisciplinary team with health professionals too. I really love it and the workload meant that although I my work hours are longer than a school day my time outside that is completely my own so it has worked really well for me whilst mine were small. Only you can weigh up the importance of those early days with the little ones and the chance of this role!
     
    MrsMusgrove likes this.
  5. MrsMusgrove

    MrsMusgrove New commenter

    Thank you. That's very helpful.
    I feel very guilty giving up time with my own children to accept the job, but these roles rarely come up. The reduced workload at home in terms of planning and marking does seem like a huge advantage for both me and my family.
     
  6. MrsMusgrove

    MrsMusgrove New commenter

    Those of you who have done or are doing this sort of advisor/consultancy role - what sort of hours do you work each day?
     
  7. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Established commenter Community helper

    I currently work in an advisory role and love it. This role suits me as I am moving towards retiring in a few years and like the flexibility of the role. There are things I miss about being in school every day but I still get to work with children on a regular basis. I went through a transition period where I was p/t in a school and p/t adviser. This gave me a year or so to decide whether I really wanted to move out of the classroom on a more permanent basis.
    If you can maintain a bit of both, it will really help if you should decide you want to return to the classroom on a more permanent basis. I feel very out of touch with some aspects of the curriculum, for example as I have specialised.
    One of the benefits of working across a lot of schools is you build up a good network of contacts and also get to see which schools/heads you enjoy working with and those you definitely wouldn't.
     
    MrsMusgrove and sabrinakat like this.
  8. MrsMusgrove

    MrsMusgrove New commenter

    Thank you for your reply. Being an advisor is a very interesting prospect. Can I ask what hours you usually work or what a typical day is like?
     
  9. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    The only downside is they are often fixed term contracts, otherwise I'd ask whether you'd prefer to do this instead of your current job?
    It's true these roles rarely come up, but you need to weigh this against the fact your children will never be this young again. Only you can decide which is more important to you.
    Also, quite often consultants -depending what type they are-have no colleagues as such. Also, many teachers get annoyed by the ones-again depends what type you are- that go in and observe them and tell them they aren't doing the job right-when they haven't done the job for years and are passing judgment like Of inspectors on people who are struggling to do a tough job. Again, only you can decide if this would bother you.
     
    MrsMusgrove likes this.
  10. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Established commenter Community helper

    I have a full-time term-time only contract. My hours do vary from day to day but I manage my own diary so I can fit things in as I choose. Travel can be an issue and I could see this being the same for you if you have to travel long distances to be at a school for 9am (some of my schools are 2 hours away). Also leading staff training sessions after school can mean getting home late. A colleague of mine has young children and this is the aspect of the job that she struggles with most as she does not have any pattern of working hours which means arranging child care is more tricky unless you have family who help out.
    Hope these ramblings help you to decide!
     
    MrsMusgrove likes this.
  11. MrsMusgrove

    MrsMusgrove New commenter

    Thank you - all very useful comments. The hours at the end of the day concern me a little, although, I'd only ever be 45 minutes away from home, this could still be quite late if I'm leading after school training sessions. However, I don't think that would be a weekly event. I have been told there is some flexibility in the hours through managing own diary. Still uncertain...
     
  12. And100

    And100 New commenter

    The hours varied and it is true that you can organize your own diary. I don't know what area you will be covering, but you may well need to travel to any school within 'your patch' so this can have implications. There were times when I had easier days working from home for all or part of the day. However there were times when I ran training for childminders for example and this was in the evenings finishing around 8pm or at the weekends. It depends which age group you work with and who you will be supporting. It worked for me but then I do not have young (or any) children so this could be tricky ...
     
    MrsMusgrove likes this.
  13. MrsMusgrove

    MrsMusgrove New commenter

    Thank you for your replies. I definitely want to do it. My only reservation is my husband, who cant understand why I would change my hours and cause disruption to our childcare arrangements. I have reassured him by explaining the flexibility and option to work from home - although, in truth, I have no idea how often that will actually happen.
     

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