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To strike or not to strike...

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by Cals, Jun 20, 2011.

  1. I'm with the NUT. I'm agency supply, but looking for a full time/permanent job. If agency rings on the 30th - should I work? I need the money, but agree with the strike and don't want to be a scab. If I were called, I wouldn't know if it were to cover a stiking teacher or a sick teacher. Should I just decide before that I'm not going to work - should I tell the agency in advance - dilemma, dilemmas!
    Cx
     
  2. I'm with the NUT. I'm agency supply, but looking for a full time/permanent job. If agency rings on the 30th - should I work? I need the money, but agree with the strike and don't want to be a scab. If I were called, I wouldn't know if it were to cover a stiking teacher or a sick teacher. Should I just decide before that I'm not going to work - should I tell the agency in advance - dilemma, dilemmas!
    Cx
     
  3. Get in there if you have the opportunity.

    1. When have the unions looked after your interests?


    2. When did the contracted staff make a fuss about your working conditions?


    3. Do you disagree that the government should borrow more money off future generations and present private sector workers so they have to work longer for less, just so these gravy trainers can retire more early on more money?


    Totally and utterly screw them. They didn't bat an eyelid when your role and finances were being torn to bits
     
  4. GodOfBiscuits

    GodOfBiscuits New commenter

    It's illegal for an employer to bring in new staff to cover a strike. It's also illegal for an agency to supply staff to cover a strike.

    If the agency ring, they will have made sure you there to cover for illness, not for a striking teacher.


     
  5. It seems that the government has contigency plans to ensure that public services such as schools remain open and if necessary can employ agency staff in order to do so.
    If it is then illegal to employ other staff such as agency workers to cover for striking staff does that mean that the politicians who advocate using agency staff are conspiring with HTs etc to act illegally?
     
  6. What did the full-timers crying for their pensions ever do when we were getting destroyed by cover supervisors, having our available work and daily rates destroyed?

    Oh yeah - they came on here, laughed, gloated, sneered, called us "overpaid crossword addicts" and enjoyed seeing those whom they percieved as getting a cushy number systematically decimated.

    Screw ethics - I'd break the strike gladly - two, three years ago I wouldn't have - but the way the full-timers (and the unions) behaved over their treatment of supplies... why the blippedy blip would I want to help their cause out now?
     
  7. jmntsp

    jmntsp New commenter

    I'm with the NUT. I'm on long term supply and I'm afraid I'll be going to work on the 30th - I can't afford to lose a day's pay. I feel 'scabby' about it but agree with those who say, '*** it - the union's done nothing for me, except take my fees'. They don't care that we can't get work, that unqualified staff are being employed over proper teachers, etc, etc. I got one day's work from Jan to April because of schools using CS. My pension will be pathetic when I finally get it because I can't get the full time work I want. I'm not losing a day's pay over principles.
     
  8. It's a difficult one....I've been wondering the same thing. Yes I am a supply teacher and yes I have very few rights and yes the union do very little for supply teachers. However, I've only been doing supply this year and I do intend to go back to full time teaching in a school within the next two years so I still need to think about my future pension rights. In principle I support the strike action. However, if I were a private sector worker I wouldn't feel the same (about paying more taxes to fund public sector worker pensions) and effectively I suppose that's what I am now. I'll probably work if I'm offered it but feel bad about it all the same!
     
  9. Strike or not to strike? Irrelevant.
    Most if not all schools will be closed and pupil told NOT TO COME IN!
    Hence unlikely to be employed as a supply teacher on the 30th June![​IMG]
     
  10. School I'm booked at isn't closing for the strike - just depends if the reason I'm booked for cover goes ahead or not (could see it being postponed if it's a course or similar). If the work's there - I'll happily do it - like I say - the unions and fulltime teachers had no loyalty to us.
     
  11. I have written to my board of Govenors, stood up to my Head teacher in front of all other staff in a staff meeting and then received other staff standing alongside me against the head teacher (and made myself very unpopular in the process) in defence of supply teachers actually.
    And if I have, imho that must mean there are others out there doing it as well, I'm not a completely mental or particularly nice person and therefore I can't be the only one doing it.
    Just because its only the tw*ts that come on here and say things, doesn't mean they are the only voice out there - they are just the people who like to troll and cause trouble.
    Please do not think that all contract teachers think nothing of supply teachers. I will not allow my school to put a TA in front of my class for any reason (other than a complete emergency involving me dropping down in front of the class and a warm body needing to be in the room *immediately* obviously), and my head knows this and therefore every single time I have been out of the classroom, whether for a day or an hour, a fully qualified supply teacher has been paid to come in and actually teach my class, as they deserve no less (we are a primary and have (thank god) no cover supervisors).
    What we desperately need as a profession is to stick together and use a combined voice to tell the powers that be that we won't stand for Cover Supervisors, cuts to pay and pension, Academies and a hundred other things. As long as we are fighting against each other, in quite frankly a childish and pathetic manner the Gov. know they have the upper hand and can continue to do exactly what they want to errode the profession, whilst they sit all cosy tucked up in Westminster with all their benifits still intact.
     
  12. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    The ATL have sent me some strike information and they are happy for their Union members to go to work on the 30th if there's a school trip, course etc that would entail loss of funds if the event were cancelled.
    I believe that they also make exceptions for teachers in their last years before retirement as a dip in service/pay would impact on pension calculations (lump sum and future annual pension).
    If the school decides to close, I don't know how a school would know which teachers are on strike The Union information is that you don't have to inform your Head in advance that you will be striking but that the Union rep should give the Head an idea of the numbers (not names) of those they expect to take strike action.
    I wonder if it might happen that a school decides to close and tells parents to keep pupils at home only for all or most staff to turn up for work (knowing the school is closed and they won't get in). They could then challenge any attempt to dock pay.
     
  13. Screw the unions. With so many teachin unions, those with power can divide and conquer.
    Have to laugh after trawling the forums some of the teachers are jumpin up and down and talkin about rules and regulations!
    Since when has anybody been bothered about rules and relgulations regarding like 3 day rules for secondary teacher absence.
    I even read one where a teacher said it was not right that a HLTA could cover his/her lessons! when they are on strike.
    Anyway they will not get the supply in so it will be daytime TV for me.
    Will be a tough day for the CS's though, as they will need to pick up the slack for the teachers getting stroppy.
    However they love the positive relationships with the children, so they can strut their stuff, whitout some pesky striking teachers.

     
  14. I'm sure we'll cope. I do so love to strut my stuff...[​IMG]

     
  15. historygrump

    historygrump Senior commenter Forum guide

    It is a difficult decision in that although the ATL say that supply teachers can work, the issue do you cross a picket line and be seen as a blackleg, because we may have to work with these striking teachers in the future. I have no sympathy for permanent teachers because of the attitude of many to supply teachers and their refusal to stand up for the teaching profession from the wannabe teachers like the CS, poor HLTA's and TA's, who actually think and pretend they are teachers or the unprofessional actions of the HT's in using such people to the determent of the education of the children. That is the difficult decision I have to make, do I say stuff the permanent teachers and do I put principles before money
     
  16. I think we should write a letter to Gove saying we are up for a days work on the day. We go in on CS rates.
    We are morally OK as we ain't teachin. Would be a great laugh, we would even be on Newsnight!
    Me Jeremy Pax and a few union high rollers. Maybe we could have a fight on camera, That would go down well.
     
  17. Problem solved! Just got an email from the agancy sayting that they won't be offering any employment on Thursday anyway!
    Cx
     
  18. I'm working on Thursday I need the money and I'm a member of NASUWT so wouldn't have been striking even if I was working. There will only be 3 classes running in the school due to the strike. I'm covering someone so they can perform interviews. So at least the school isn't trying to cover striking teachers. However I don't like the idea of the other teachers being at the school gates if indeed they are while I go in. Oh well I need the money which I partly blame on the tax man/government for screwing up my tax. They took 80% of my pay last week due to giving me the wrong tax code. They don't know what to do with someone who works for so many different agencies. How I'm supposed to survive on a measly 20% of a day and a half work is beyond me...
     
  19. Don't even think about it. You'll get that job in time.
     
  20. i came to ask the exact same question, never imagining there'd be anyone opposed to the strike, just everyone wringing their hands about it. i'm impressed, and stuff like cover supervisors, i thought: YEAH. i like to think that if/when/if i get a permanent post, i'll never forget how hard being a supply teacher was...
    i'm glad to hear i prob won't get an offer of work on thur.
    oh, and, right, cameron. it was fine to close schools on 29th april in honour of that macarbre spectacle but this is just wrong? welllll, take yer mum's army and see where they get you. [​IMG]
     

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