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To all those fabulous, creative and modern teachers out there...help please!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by minnieminx, Dec 16, 2011.

  1. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    What would you suggest for a WOW and exciting hook type thingy for a topic on traditional tales for year 2?

    We are going to start with Goldilocks and the Three Bears, using Pie Corbett storytelling ideas.
    For independent learning over the half term, we have made a Storytelling Cottage as a role play area ready to go and also made a 'Reading Cafe' (with imaginary drinks and food). We have a writing area ready to write lots and lots of 'once upon a time...' stories.

    The planning for the actual teaching sequence is also pretty much fine, love storytelling and so happy with it.

    But what to do for the first day to launch the topic as it were? The class know we are doing stories and so are excited already, but I need a way to start to convince my SLT that I am not stuck in the dark ages and do know how to teach in the 21st century.

    Any or all ideas very much appreciated, thank you.
     
  2. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    Stage a crime scene in the role-play area. Three bowls two with porridge and one empty, broken chair etc....
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I would start with a table set with three bowls (two containing porridge with the third having been eaten) and then a bit of a discussion about who it might belong to and who has eaten the third portion ... perhaps hot seat the bears ...how do they feel coming home to find an intruder?

     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    snap [​IMG]
     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Brilliant! I knew I should just ask! Thank you so much.

    I could borrow chairs from nursery and year 6 to make different sizes (not sure i can break the nursery one though...might need to imagine that part!) and have different size porridge bowls and spoons as well. Beds children could make themselves later with various cushions.

    We will almost certainly have assembly on the first day back, so my TA or me could set it up quickly after the children go and so just be a little late for assembly.

    Do you think hot seating the three bears (I do have three bears in the class of different sizes so they could be propped up as well) before they learn the story would work?
     
  6. Only if they are talking bears

     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I would have three children in role ... it depends on your class mine would know Goldilocks inside out (I wouldn't use the story with Y2 in my school for that reason) so could easily manage but if your children are unfamiliar with the story it would be better to wait.
     
  8. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    They could be, if I recorded answers to questions beforehand,
    I'm hoping that a fair number do know the story. I'm sort of thinking of demonstrating the hot seating idea (we haven't done it and I wouldn't think year 1 have either) with recorded answers from the 'bears' and me asking the questions with a microphone. Then letting them go off in groups of 4 with a microphone to record their hot seating interviews. Dunno if this is any good though...the main thing to learn is identifying with the characters and reading clues sort of thing.
     
  9. queenlit

    queenlit New commenter

  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Last year I used The Snow Queen
     
  11. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    The Snow Queen really haunted me as a child, so I'd really recommend it.
    Don't forget the wonderfully hideous and frightening Russian witch, Baba Yar. I loved those stories. Or go English and 'do' Scarborough Fair. Now there's a weird tale, and you'll have the song to learn as well..
     
  12. inky

    inky Lead commenter

  13. queenlit

    queenlit New commenter

  14. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Queenlit, you've posted links, and thank you for them, but what do you think?
     
  15. Hi,
    I have love reading this thread as it helps us all to know that what we are doing is good teaching. I am in Yr 1 and and doing The Stick Man in January - do you think it is suitable to have some role play in the form of a crime scene around the stick man for them or are they too young to access this efffectively?

    Sorry for asking a different question on your thread minnieminx
     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I used the Firebird and The Swan Maiden in reception
    The Selkie Woman works really well too.
     
  17. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Sorry to interrupt your question, snorkel.
    Surely by Y2 they should be internalizing the universal themes and patterns that are found in traditional stories rather than just using them as maths and literacy fodder? And how do you do that other than by hearing lots of stories? How can you learn about 'story' if your experience of stories is limited to just a few?
     
  18. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Wonderful musical opportunities there. I used to love to dress up and dance to the lovely Stravinsky music to the Firebird, and there's a beautiful folksong about the Selkie.
     
  19. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I think that as well in a way. But our school has traditionally done simple stories in yr2. I though Goldilocks as it is fairly straightforward for children to rewrite with changes, at all levels and because there are a lot of resources available, such as writing paper and the like.

    We do also use Three Billy Goats Gruff, but I'm not sure that is 'meatier' as such. Pinocchio is a possibility, as one the children asked for.
    So there does need to be a balance between revisiting well known stories and extending with new more complex ones? Though to learn about traditional story language and the like there needs to be a lot of shorter stories surely?
    Do you need a crime scene for the Stick Man? Does a crime occur? I always just the poor chap is unlucky.

    Agghhh this is all too hard. Perhaps I should just buy one of those naff 100 lesson type books and follow it stupidly?!
     
  20. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    but do you have to use the shorter stories for your literacy focus or would it be better to tell them at story time. As I said earlier I wouldn't use Goldilocks with my Y2 classbut you know your school and children
     

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