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Time off for stress or ask for compassionate leave?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by oliverferret, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    My house was flooded by a burst pipe over Xmas and will not be habitable for the next 6-8 months. In addition approx 75% of our personal possessions and furniture is ruined. So far the only time I've had off is 1 lot of PPA time, but everything is now coming to a head - people that need to come are people to assess damage to our clothing and curtains, furniture and picture restoration companys, another company who itemise each individual piece of damaged property - books, clothes, electrical goods, cds etc etc. (The claim for personal possessions is likely to be around £20,000+). I've also got builders in who are literally stripping the house back to the brick work and I have had to spend every evening packing and piling our possessions into 2 rooms so that they can clear rooms for drying but so all the items are available for inspection.
    I am a single parent and I am waking up every morning at 4am literally sick with worry. Friends and family have been great but there are things that only I can do and at some point in the next couple of weeks I have to also move house (at present we are staying with friends). I do feel extremely stressed but have not been to the doctor. My question really is am I entitled to compassionate leave and if so how does that work - I need individual days off rather than a block or should I go to the doctor and ask for time off for stress (which I feel would be totally justified)? I hate taking time off work but feel I need to sort this mess out. Any advice would be gratefully appreciated
     
  2. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    My house was flooded by a burst pipe over Xmas and will not be habitable for the next 6-8 months. In addition approx 75% of our personal possessions and furniture is ruined. So far the only time I've had off is 1 lot of PPA time, but everything is now coming to a head - people that need to come are people to assess damage to our clothing and curtains, furniture and picture restoration companys, another company who itemise each individual piece of damaged property - books, clothes, electrical goods, cds etc etc. (The claim for personal possessions is likely to be around £20,000+). I've also got builders in who are literally stripping the house back to the brick work and I have had to spend every evening packing and piling our possessions into 2 rooms so that they can clear rooms for drying but so all the items are available for inspection.
    I am a single parent and I am waking up every morning at 4am literally sick with worry. Friends and family have been great but there are things that only I can do and at some point in the next couple of weeks I have to also move house (at present we are staying with friends). I do feel extremely stressed but have not been to the doctor. My question really is am I entitled to compassionate leave and if so how does that work - I need individual days off rather than a block or should I go to the doctor and ask for time off for stress (which I feel would be totally justified)? I hate taking time off work but feel I need to sort this mess out. Any advice would be gratefully appreciated
     
  3. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    Just ask them, most companies treat their staff well. If they say no then worry about a doctors note but will that work for individual days if its for stress? x
     
  4. Talk frankly to your head. If you are worried about stress on your record, don't be. "yes, I had time off for stress, but my house was flooded and I was living out of boxes, now it is sorted". I can't see your head not helping, they need you back to your best asap.
     
  5. OR

    Ask for time off, unpaid, and add the lost wages to the insurance claim
     
  6. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    Sounds absolutely awful. I'd go to the doc. I'm sure you would be given time off for stress.
     
  7. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    Will the insurance claim pay for this? That would seem a good option.
     
  8. A doctor won't sign you off for days here and there. If you are genuinely stressed you need more than a couple of days here and there. I'd echo the advice here to be honest with the head - do you have colleagues who might swap around a bit and cover for you here and there?
     
  9. Richie Millions

    Richie Millions New commenter

    The gatekeeper to this sort of leave be it called compassionate or not is your Head. As before be open honest and unless they are a complete b****ard I am sure they will be sympathetic. The actual leave is technically granted by the governing body so you could have recourse to them if you felt you were not been treated fairly or with compassion.
     
  10. Richie Millions

    Richie Millions New commenter

    Many authorities guide Heads and have a policy of say, "Up to ten days compassionate leave in any one year." The words up to are key, it is not a right but at the discretion of the Head. But to answer your other question these days could be spread over a period of time when you need them. However even compassionate leave is not an endless pot of gold ever replenished.

    To my mind compassionate leave would be preferable to sick leave as this will show up on your record when you apply for further jobs and a series of odd days for "stress" could look potentially dangerous to a future employer.
     
  11. I doubt that compassionate leave would cover this, I know of cases where it hasn't covered a death (not a close relation) It's entirely up to the HT - they have the flexibility to decided yes or no in these sort of circumstances.
    I agree with the poster who advises taking the time unpaid and adding it to the insurance claim.
    Good luck. What a **** situation.
     
  12. Richie Millions

    Richie Millions New commenter

    The reality is soots sweetie that all future employers will ask for references this will include a request for number of absences during the last two years and reasons for them. In essence if they are put on the application form or not is irrrelvant x
     
  13. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    Checked with the insurers and they will not pay for loss of earnings and I can't afford not to be paid.
    I will talk to the head about compassionate leave as I think I would prefer this to sick leave.
     
  14. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    It wasn't just a "bit of fresh water" but a yellow coloured water that had run through the loft first and subsequently through every room in the house. The leak happened on 24th December - I returned from holiday on 29th. Delays by the insurance company and loss adjuster (who instructed me to leave items in situ) coupled with no electricity and no where to store stuff means that clothes, curtain etc etc have started to go mouldy. The delays have meant that there are still no driers in the house and no one has come to inspect the damaged items. In fact because of the delays condensation etc has caused more problems and damaged more items.
     
  15. Ask them

    My colleagues insurance company covered salary when she was delayed by the ash
     
  16. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    And they are not supposed to make such a request until they have offered the post to the candidate. Any pre employment medical questions must relate specifically to the requirements of carrying out that particular role. Try reading Section 60 the Act, Ritchie.

    Oh, and please don't address me as "sweetie". [​IMG]

    To the OP: I do hope you get something sorted. My house was flooded a few years ago and it is a miserable experience.
     
  17. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    And they are not supposed to make such a request until they have offered the post to the candidate. Any pre employment medical questions must relate specifically to the requirements of carrying out that particular role. Try reading Section 60 of the Act, Ritchie.

    Oh, and please don't address me as "sweetie". [​IMG]

    To the OP: I do hope you get something sorted. My house was flooded a few years ago and it is a miserable experience.
     
  18. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    http://www.teachingexpertise.com/articles/equality-act-2010-how-will-it-affect-recruitment-10529
     
  19. Just ask your head first.
     

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