1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Tidy up time in Year 1

Discussion in 'Primary' started by mmc39, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. Can anyone give me some tips on this please?
    We have a foundation stage curriculum in the afternoon and the children enjoy this play based curriculum. By the end of the afternoon the room looks a bit of a mess.
    I have found with my class they are very quick to make mess but some are very reluctant to tidy it.
    I have found tidy up time to be a bit of a moan session when I am constantly seeing children doing very little to help.
    Any tips on this to make it a positive experience and be able to motivate kids to want to tidy up.
    Any ideas greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Can anyone give me some tips on this please?
    We have a foundation stage curriculum in the afternoon and the children enjoy this play based curriculum. By the end of the afternoon the room looks a bit of a mess.
    I have found with my class they are very quick to make mess but some are very reluctant to tidy it.
    I have found tidy up time to be a bit of a moan session when I am constantly seeing children doing very little to help.
    Any tips on this to make it a positive experience and be able to motivate kids to want to tidy up.
    Any ideas greatly appreciated!
     
  3. I always do 'magic mess'.
    The children who tidy away the magic mess get team points.
    I also have the children in team tables who are responsible for keeping their own table and a certain area tidy. The group with the tidiest table/area get points.
     
  4. Oh, and I also very loudly praise those who are tidying up.
     
  5. thepinkrachael

    thepinkrachael New commenter

    Agree with the praise for those who are helping.
    In my class we have a Tidy Up song, I tell the children I'm putting it on and we tidy up while it's playing, by the end of it the classroom should be tidy and they should all be sat on carpet/at tables.
    I then have a Superstar Tidier Upperwho gets sticker for being extra helpful at tidy up time/tidying up lots of different things/tidying something carefully etc. I tell children why they are getting it to help encourage different things at tidy up time.
     
  6. skellig1182

    skellig1182 New commenter

    I can't offer much advice, i have a class who are obbsessed with cleaning. They even want to clean my desk, notice a bit of paper on the floor, or a chair not tucked in. I do have a lot of girl though!
     
  7. Thank you for all that - lots of good ideas!
     
  8. Children don't always understand how to tidy up, some need specific guidance, so I tend to give some children specific tasks such as picking up paper off the floor.
     
  9. How about telling them to tidy up? [​IMG]
     
  10. I'll always do magic mess like pff- they love it! But I agree that sometimes they wander round not actually knowing what to do, in which case i will say, "So-and-so, can you pick up 20 bits of paper?" or "So-and-so, there are two glue sticks under that table" etc. You do need to keep on top of it but at this age the majority of them- in my class at any rate- need specific guidance. If I remove my attention to talk to a child or hear a reader or something, nothing gets done!
     
  11. I know it sounds a bit odd but just saying "Tidy up" doesn't mean much to them, it's too abstract, even some Y1 children don't seem able to translate it into action. But say, "Pick up the paper under the table" and they know what to do. It works better than just going round saying, "Tidy up" until you are feeling a bit weary. [​IMG]
     
  12. All very well and good if you have children that actually know what that means! When you teached pampered princes and princesses who never have to pick up after themselves you actually have to show them what to do and motivate them to do it.
     
  13. My Year 1s come from an FS unit where there are so many staff that all the tidying is done for them. The first couple of weeks in my Y1 class are spent training them to keep the place tidy.
     
  14. Exactly. Which kind of goes against your post of just 'telling them to tidy up'.
     
  15. Thank you for all advice. I think you are right that some may simply not know how to tidy up as they never have to do it at home or little experience in FS.
    I might have a lesson on how to tidy up and put them in teams with an area for each team to tidy up.
    I have a girl in my class who has severe learning difficulties who really is the equivalent of a 2 year old mentally. I have asked her ISA to take her by the hand and show her how to tidy up. Admittedly she gets bored after a few minutes and disruptive and the next thing I know her ISA has her sitting on the carpet saying she's just messing around so I've sat her down. This annoys me a little because I think it sets a bad example to the rest. However much I tell her ISA I don't expect this I find myself repeating the same thing every tidy up time. How do I deal with this? Any tips?
    When the children are tidying up, as a teacher do you help too? At the moment I stand and watch them and praise who I see tidying up. However I often wonder is this setting a bad example when I am not offering to help and just standing and watching. Any help on this one too?
    Many thanks
     
  16. I don't help tidy up!
     
  17. I wondered this too, and I do go round picking up the odd bit, but a) I have to concentrate on keeping on top of them tidying, and b) I try to ensure that children tidy up the mess they made themselves (as well as general mess made by everyone!)
    Teejay- no matter how much training some of my children have had, they still can't "just tidy up". They're mainly 5 for goodness' sake. Don't forget that their idea of tidying/putting things away might not be quite the same as ours, so we have to teach them.
     
  18. Maybe you could organise your classroom in a simpler way then it wouldn't be difficult to know where things go?

    To clarify, when I said to spend a couple of weeks training my class, I meant training them to know what was an acceptable way to leave the classroom, e.g. pencils in pots, cubes, numberlines, etc back in the correct draws, chairs under tables, if you drop a pencil pick it up, all rubbish in the bin, keep workspace tidy and (PE time) - clothes folded on chairs, etc. If it isn't done properly insist on it being done again until it is. It is not rocket science.
     

Share This Page