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Three Year GCSE and Likley End of Modular

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by pencho, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. pencho

    pencho New commenter

    Hi All
    With the end of Modular a real possibility in maths from Sep 2012, I would be interested to know what other schools are doing with Y9 (if they start a modular GCSE course next year).
    For example, if we go with our plan of OCR Modular, then do we have to enter them early at the end of Y10 (which was not our ever our intention) if we want to follow modular?
    I'm thinking at the moment there is no point in Y9 doing any modular units? Is this right. My worry is that Y9 could do a module and then the marks will be worthless. Even if you plan to get it out of the way by the end of Y10, the module marks will be worth nothing after this.
    Have I got this right. I am genuinley interested in what others who follow modular are planning on doing.


     
  2. pencho

    pencho New commenter

    Hi All
    With the end of Modular a real possibility in maths from Sep 2012, I would be interested to know what other schools are doing with Y9 (if they start a modular GCSE course next year).
    For example, if we go with our plan of OCR Modular, then do we have to enter them early at the end of Y10 (which was not our ever our intention) if we want to follow modular?
    I'm thinking at the moment there is no point in Y9 doing any modular units? Is this right. My worry is that Y9 could do a module and then the marks will be worthless. Even if you plan to get it out of the way by the end of Y10, the module marks will be worth nothing after this.
    Have I got this right. I am genuinley interested in what others who follow modular are planning on doing.


     
  3. Interesting scenario!
    In the past there has usually been an extra sitting of 'legacy' qualifications in November to allow for resits - if they do this again then you can push it into the first term of Yr 11. This time around I think Edexcel even wangled a final sitting of an old exam specification in March - that is very clearly very close to the end of Yr 11 for these pupils.
    Just out of interest, why do your Yr 9 pupils sit a GCSE module? All of the possible reasons I can come up with still mean it is worth doing even if they later have to retake the same material as part of a linear exam.
     
  4. pencho

    pencho New commenter

    I really can't see the legacy happening. Gove seems quite adament that he knows best.
    We have moved to a 3 year GCSE (to be honest everything they do in Secondary school IMO works towards their GCSE). I suppose we have put it in Y9 so that it gives them something to work towards at the end of Y9.
    I know lots of schools are now doing a 3 year GCSE (now SATS have gone) and I just wondered how other schools were going to approach this.
    Interestingly on the Edexcel website it says that the November resit for maths and english is likely going to be only that (a resit) and the way I'm reading it implies that that only students who have already had a go at the GCSE can attempt it in November.
    Interesting times ahead. I do think OFQUAL or the DFE need to inform schools pretty quickly of their final intentions as it is important for a lot of schools undertaking a three year GCSE.
     
  5. Hi Pencho,
    Ofqual's announcement and Gove's reply both say "for two year courses starting in September 2012 (and three year courses starting in September 2011)" so although we don't know for certain how it will work in detail (including when the final series under the old rules will be), it will almost certainly mean your new Y9s will have to take all assessment at the end, if 'the end' is June 2014.
    Have got a few quotes here: http://social.ocr.org.uk/groups/maths/conversations/how-long-will-maths-j562-be-around
    Kevin
     
  6. Chazette

    Chazette New commenter

    Originally my Y9s were going to start AQA modular Unit 1, then do units 2/3 in Y10 leaving Y11 for retakes or english boosting. Now they are following a general scheme of work for the year and then will start AQA Linear GCSE in Y10.
    Question - why did they remove the intermediate tier in linear GCSES?
     
  7. Maths_Mike

    Maths_Mike New commenter

    Because they wanted a two teir in common with other subjects and some do gooders objected to the fact that poor foundation students didnt have the chance of a C grade. The fact that most foiundation students didnt even have much chance of a E grade didnt seem relevant.
    Of course the intermediate was by fdar the most popular and most suitable exam for the vast majority of students - but when has the needs of a majority ever mattered when the PC brigade are in town?
     
  8. pencho

    pencho New commenter

    Agree Mike. Maybe we could start and e petition.

    Maybe the ACME will take up our cause.

    How come they never listen to the teachers.
     
  9. BillyBobJoe

    BillyBobJoe Occasional commenter

    A little bit one sided, don't you think? Allowing students at foundation tier the hope that they could get a C, even if it's unlikely, can be an excellent motivator. The foundation tier C grade was a response to the league table focus on Cs that made students feel that they were the only thing that mattered. Most students who would have previously taken the intermediate paper are perfectly capable of doing the current higher. The real issue is the narrowing of the A/A* band at the top.
     
  10. Maths_Mike

    Maths_Mike New commenter

    No the real issue is we went from a system that suited the needs of the majority and was a fairer test at all levels to one that is much worse.
     
  11. googolplex

    googolplex Occasional commenter

    The current higher tier is nothing more than an intermediate paper with a few top end questions thrown in for good measure. So, we don't need another intermediate tier - this paper pretty much serves that purpose, and I wouldn't change it for middle ability students since, in the respect that it answers the need for students at intermediate who couldn't get beyond a grade B, it is something of an improvement.
    However, it doesn't fit the bill for the most able mathematicians. For them, we need an extension tier which serves the interests of those who intend doing A-level. This should start at grade B and go up from there. Like the old Higher tier...
     

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