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Thread for new teachers and those moving room/phase

Discussion in 'Primary' started by bluerose, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. re vamped old links to make neater

    what to ask when you visit your new school - yes do make sure you do this dont wait to be invited. find out how to get in over summer too. also get phone contacts for a couple of staff.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...
    listen to advice of your school dont over plan in summer you could end up having to do it all againg

    Get your room looking good so one less thing to worry about- check any display rules with school before summer eg we have things that have to be displayed also rules about what can be hung up
    photos of displays
    http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    where to get display and other resources
    http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...
    plus theres the parasites thread on primary too
    class swop day too late now but might be some ideas re activities for first day
    I have just got a my first job and its year 4. I'm really excited and keep thinking of what I want my classroom to be like and what I need to do etc. I've got a "meet the teacher" morning soon and was just wondering what to do with the class when I first meet them. I want to save all the "rules" type stuff for september, and was thinking about a general talk to introduce each other, and if there's time getting them to write something about themselves, what they like at school and are looking forward to etc to put on display over the summer so there's something up at the start of term, also so I can get an idea of what their writing is like. obviously this is the first time i have done this, so want to check this is ok or if there are any good ideas people have used before? thanks!
    You could do an all about me book! Find out all about them!

    You could write them a letter and ask them questions in it. In return, they must write a reply asking you questions, which you could then answer at the end of the day!
    Someone on here suggested a nice idea last year about the children designing their own personal shield with different parts of the shield representing their interests, hobbies, likes / dislikes etc Makes a nice display.
    Like those ideas - when i visited the school this class had just made shields (Romans topic) so that could work well. Thank you!
    MY FIRST THOUGHT WAS: MAKE them aware of your very high expectations - don't be nice!!!

    That's what I am worried about Gertie Grumbles. I have Y3s again next year. Transfer morning in July with Y2s and I am worried that I am going to make them cry! Used to have UKS2!

    I really like the shield idea. Has anyone any idea of how this could be linked to Ancient Egyptians as that is our topic in the autumn term and it would be nice to link it to that.
    If it helps, most kids will be failing over themselves to please you apart from one or two or may show off. These will be the ones to watch in September.

    You could always invite a hot seating activity with you in the hot seat. Allow them some time to think of some questions they would like to ask. They will most certainly be lovely questions. Remember they will be more nervous than you !!!!!!.

    We often forget what it is like to be 8
    Have done this several times, for different age groups - Y3 to Y6 - and it seems to work every time. Do a presentation of yourself - fav music, book, photos of family, hobbies etc. Play the music, show the photos and books.

    In advance give them a 'myself' sheet that they can prepare to do a presentation about themselves. Or if you can't give them this in advance give them the sheet so they can plan it whilst you are there.

    Children love to know information about their teacher!
    I like this idea, but you might have to be careful how much info you impart surely?
    I just hope I have a KS2 class next year, as I don't know yet!!! And I want to use this!!
    plus loads more here
    http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    Gentleben
    I've started to pull together some teaching methods/games, starter and plenary ideas plus assessment information: http://www.teachinglinks.co.uk/infoideas.htm#115566160

    some resources
    http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    Posted by: nomad at 09 Jul 2007 20:38



    Tips to Help New Teachers with Classroom Management


    Classroom management and discipline causes the most fear and consternation in new teachers. However, classroom management is a skill that is not only learned but practised daily. Here are ten tips that can lead to successful classroom management and discipline. These tips can help you cut down on discipline problems and leave you with fewer interruptions and disruptions.


    1. It?s easier to get easier
    Many new and even some veteran teachers make the mistake of starting the school year off being too easy. Pupils quickly assess the situation in each new class and realize what they will be allowed to get away with. Once you set a precedent of allowing a lot of disruptions, it can be very hard to get tougher. However, it is never tough to get a little easier as the year goes on. While you don?t have to follow the adage, ?Never smile until Christmas,? it does hold a lot of truth.

    2. Fairness is key
    Pupils have a distinct sense of what is and what is not fair. You must act fairly for all pupils if you expect to be respected. If you do not treat all pupils equitably, you will be labelled as unfair and pupils will not be keen to follow your rules. Make sure that if your best pupil does something wrong, they too get punished for it.

    3. Deal with disruptions with as little interruption as possible
    When you have classroom disruptions, it is imperative that you deal with them immediately and with as little interruption of your class momentum as possible. If pupils are talking amongst themselves and you are having a classroom discussion, ask one of them a question to try to get them back on track. If you have to stop the flow of your lesson to deal with disruptions, then you are robbing pupils who want to learn of their precious in-class time.

    4. Avoid confrontations in front of pupils
    Whenever there is a confrontation in class, there is a winner and a loser. Obviously as the teacher, you need to keep order and discipline in your class. However, it is much better to deal with discipline issues privately than cause a pupil to ?lose face? in front of their friends. It is not a good idea to make an example out of a disciplinary issue. Even though other pupils might get the point, you might have lost any chance of actually teaching that pupil anything in your class.

    5. Stop disruptions with a little humour
    Sometimes all it takes is for everyone to have a good laugh to get things back on track in a classroom. Many times, however, teachers confuse good humour with sarcasm. While humour can quickly diffuse a situation, sarcasm may harm your relationship with the pupils involved. Use your best judgment but realize that what some people think as funny others find to be offensive.

    6. Keep high expectations in your class
    Expect that your pupils will behave, not that they will disrupt. Reinforce this with the way you speak to your pupils. When you begin the day, tell your pupils your expectations. For example, you might say, ?During this whole group session, I expect you to raise your hands and be recognised before you start speaking. I also expect you to respect each others' opinions and listen to what each person has to say.?

    7. Over-plan
    Free time is something teachers should avoid. By allowing pupils time just to talk each day, you are setting a precedent about how you view academics and your subject. To avoid this, over-plan. When you have too much to cover, you?ll never run out of lessons and you will avoid free time.

    8. Be consistent
    One of the worst things you can do as a teacher is to not enforce your rules consistently. If one day you ignore misbehaviour and the next day you jump on someone for the smallest infraction, your pupils will quickly lose respect for you. Your pupils have the right to expect you to be basically the same every day. Moodiness is not allowed. Once you lose your pupils? respect, you also lose their attention and their desire to please you.

    9. Make rules understandable
    You need to be selective in your rules (no one can follow 100+ rules consistently). You also need to make them clear. Pupils should understand what is and what is not acceptable. Further, you should make sure that the consequences for breaking your rules are also clear and known beforehand.

    10. Start fresh everyday
    This tip does not mean that you discount all previous infractions, i.e., if they have been late three times, then today means four. However, it does mean that you should start teaching your class each day with the expectation that pupils will behave. Don?t assume that because Wayne has disrupted your class everyday for a week, he will disrupt it today. By doing this, you will not be treating Wayne any differently and thereby setting him up to disrupt again (like a self-fulfilling prophecy).


    The following Teacher Tips have been taken from the Behaviour Management in Education web site: http://www.bmef.org/; Author: Jenny Mackay


    Pupils' Incessant Talking in Class.


    ? Plan for misbehaviour. Look at your classroom seating. Should it be changed? ? Arrange desks so that you can walk around the room - have easy access to all students.

    ? Take control. Try to ensure mobility around the room, give bits of your lesson from where they sit, also from the back - not obviously (over-control), - move around a bit. Or from time to time just move around the classroom and just stand near your students.

    ? Catch them doing it right -discipline from the positive not the negative. Take away their need to act out in class. Acknowledge something they?re doing well e.g., ?I see you?ve go that maths problem right ? Great!?. Be smart - Give them no cause to disrupt your lesson, rather to come back on task because they feel okay about you.

    ? Least intrusion into the lesson. Don?t make a big deal out of it. Remember they?re not doing it to get at you ? they?re just doing it because they feel like it. (Although if you go over the top in your response ? they?ll continue as its fun to get such heavy reactions to something minimal).

    ? Use non verbal messages ? firm eye contact at times, raised eyebrow, gesture, :- so they know that you know what they?re up to. Send a non-verbal message of disapproval but also one of no fuss.

    ? Don?t get hooked-in ? unconsciously they?re either seeking attention, checking out if they can take control here, ? would love a power struggle, maybe they want to impress their peers ? all unconscious goals of misbehaviour, ? gives them a sense of belonging. ? I?m the cheeky one, the naughty one and any such response to these will reinforce the goals of misbehaviour. Just refuse to play their game. You?re the teacher. All kids push the limits. Acknowledge this and refuse to get hooked-in. You have no intention of getting hooked-in to such behaviour but keep your response low key.

    ? Managing attitude. If some concern on your part, take one aside, preferably the leader and send a clear ?I? message e.g., ?When people mess around in class, I am concerned. No attention = low marks. I don?t want that to happen to you. OK!?


    NOTE: As you?ve been heavily reacting to their behaviour ? and you?re going to change your response ? you may find they?ll push you ? just to check if you?re for real. Stay cool. You are the teacher here. Keep focusing on catching them when they do ?it? (anything), right. They just need a gentle reminder and divert by catching them doing it right. No fuss and they?ll settle down.

    BehaviourUK: http://www.behaviouruk.com

    Behavior Management in Education Foundation: http://www.bmef.org/


    checklist http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?messag...

    http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...


    setting up classroom http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    displays http://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    We've been putting together a New class pack whch should be avalable for download on www.trinityeducational.co.uk
     
  2. re vamped old links to make neater

    what to ask when you visit your new school - yes do make sure you do this dont wait to be invited. find out how to get in over summer too. also get phone contacts for a couple of staff.
    https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...
    listen to advice of your school dont over plan in summer you could end up having to do it all againg

    Get your room looking good so one less thing to worry about- check any display rules with school before summer eg we have things that have to be displayed also rules about what can be hung up
    photos of displays
    https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    where to get display and other resources
    https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...
    plus theres the parasites thread on primary too
    class swop day too late now but might be some ideas re activities for first day
    I have just got a my first job and its year 4. I'm really excited and keep thinking of what I want my classroom to be like and what I need to do etc. I've got a "meet the teacher" morning soon and was just wondering what to do with the class when I first meet them. I want to save all the "rules" type stuff for september, and was thinking about a general talk to introduce each other, and if there's time getting them to write something about themselves, what they like at school and are looking forward to etc to put on display over the summer so there's something up at the start of term, also so I can get an idea of what their writing is like. obviously this is the first time i have done this, so want to check this is ok or if there are any good ideas people have used before? thanks!
    You could do an all about me book! Find out all about them!

    You could write them a letter and ask them questions in it. In return, they must write a reply asking you questions, which you could then answer at the end of the day!
    Someone on here suggested a nice idea last year about the children designing their own personal shield with different parts of the shield representing their interests, hobbies, likes / dislikes etc Makes a nice display.
    Like those ideas - when i visited the school this class had just made shields (Romans topic) so that could work well. Thank you!
    MY FIRST THOUGHT WAS: MAKE them aware of your very high expectations - don't be nice!!!

    That's what I am worried about Gertie Grumbles. I have Y3s again next year. Transfer morning in July with Y2s and I am worried that I am going to make them cry! Used to have UKS2!

    I really like the shield idea. Has anyone any idea of how this could be linked to Ancient Egyptians as that is our topic in the autumn term and it would be nice to link it to that.
    If it helps, most kids will be failing over themselves to please you apart from one or two or may show off. These will be the ones to watch in September.

    You could always invite a hot seating activity with you in the hot seat. Allow them some time to think of some questions they would like to ask. They will most certainly be lovely questions. Remember they will be more nervous than you !!!!!!.

    We often forget what it is like to be 8
    Have done this several times, for different age groups - Y3 to Y6 - and it seems to work every time. Do a presentation of yourself - fav music, book, photos of family, hobbies etc. Play the music, show the photos and books.

    In advance give them a 'myself' sheet that they can prepare to do a presentation about themselves. Or if you can't give them this in advance give them the sheet so they can plan it whilst you are there.

    Children love to know information about their teacher!
    I like this idea, but you might have to be careful how much info you impart surely?
    I just hope I have a KS2 class next year, as I don't know yet!!! And I want to use this!!
    plus loads more here
    https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    Gentleben
    I've started to pull together some teaching methods/games, starter and plenary ideas plus assessment information: http://www.teachinglinks.co.uk/infoideas.htm#115566160

    some resources
    https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    Posted by: nomad at 09 Jul 2007 20:38



    Tips to Help New Teachers with Classroom Management


    Classroom management and discipline causes the most fear and consternation in new teachers. However, classroom management is a skill that is not only learned but practised daily. Here are ten tips that can lead to successful classroom management and discipline. These tips can help you cut down on discipline problems and leave you with fewer interruptions and disruptions.


    1. It?s easier to get easier
    Many new and even some veteran teachers make the mistake of starting the school year off being too easy. Pupils quickly assess the situation in each new class and realize what they will be allowed to get away with. Once you set a precedent of allowing a lot of disruptions, it can be very hard to get tougher. However, it is never tough to get a little easier as the year goes on. While you don?t have to follow the adage, ?Never smile until Christmas,? it does hold a lot of truth.

    2. Fairness is key
    Pupils have a distinct sense of what is and what is not fair. You must act fairly for all pupils if you expect to be respected. If you do not treat all pupils equitably, you will be labelled as unfair and pupils will not be keen to follow your rules. Make sure that if your best pupil does something wrong, they too get punished for it.

    3. Deal with disruptions with as little interruption as possible
    When you have classroom disruptions, it is imperative that you deal with them immediately and with as little interruption of your class momentum as possible. If pupils are talking amongst themselves and you are having a classroom discussion, ask one of them a question to try to get them back on track. If you have to stop the flow of your lesson to deal with disruptions, then you are robbing pupils who want to learn of their precious in-class time.

    4. Avoid confrontations in front of pupils
    Whenever there is a confrontation in class, there is a winner and a loser. Obviously as the teacher, you need to keep order and discipline in your class. However, it is much better to deal with discipline issues privately than cause a pupil to ?lose face? in front of their friends. It is not a good idea to make an example out of a disciplinary issue. Even though other pupils might get the point, you might have lost any chance of actually teaching that pupil anything in your class.

    5. Stop disruptions with a little humour
    Sometimes all it takes is for everyone to have a good laugh to get things back on track in a classroom. Many times, however, teachers confuse good humour with sarcasm. While humour can quickly diffuse a situation, sarcasm may harm your relationship with the pupils involved. Use your best judgment but realize that what some people think as funny others find to be offensive.

    6. Keep high expectations in your class
    Expect that your pupils will behave, not that they will disrupt. Reinforce this with the way you speak to your pupils. When you begin the day, tell your pupils your expectations. For example, you might say, ?During this whole group session, I expect you to raise your hands and be recognised before you start speaking. I also expect you to respect each others' opinions and listen to what each person has to say.?

    7. Over-plan
    Free time is something teachers should avoid. By allowing pupils time just to talk each day, you are setting a precedent about how you view academics and your subject. To avoid this, over-plan. When you have too much to cover, you?ll never run out of lessons and you will avoid free time.

    8. Be consistent
    One of the worst things you can do as a teacher is to not enforce your rules consistently. If one day you ignore misbehaviour and the next day you jump on someone for the smallest infraction, your pupils will quickly lose respect for you. Your pupils have the right to expect you to be basically the same every day. Moodiness is not allowed. Once you lose your pupils? respect, you also lose their attention and their desire to please you.

    9. Make rules understandable
    You need to be selective in your rules (no one can follow 100+ rules consistently). You also need to make them clear. Pupils should understand what is and what is not acceptable. Further, you should make sure that the consequences for breaking your rules are also clear and known beforehand.

    10. Start fresh everyday
    This tip does not mean that you discount all previous infractions, i.e., if they have been late three times, then today means four. However, it does mean that you should start teaching your class each day with the expectation that pupils will behave. Don?t assume that because Wayne has disrupted your class everyday for a week, he will disrupt it today. By doing this, you will not be treating Wayne any differently and thereby setting him up to disrupt again (like a self-fulfilling prophecy).


    The following Teacher Tips have been taken from the Behaviour Management in Education web site: http://www.bmef.org/; Author: Jenny Mackay


    Pupils' Incessant Talking in Class.


    ? Plan for misbehaviour. Look at your classroom seating. Should it be changed? ? Arrange desks so that you can walk around the room - have easy access to all students.

    ? Take control. Try to ensure mobility around the room, give bits of your lesson from where they sit, also from the back - not obviously (over-control), - move around a bit. Or from time to time just move around the classroom and just stand near your students.

    ? Catch them doing it right -discipline from the positive not the negative. Take away their need to act out in class. Acknowledge something they?re doing well e.g., ?I see you?ve go that maths problem right ? Great!?. Be smart - Give them no cause to disrupt your lesson, rather to come back on task because they feel okay about you.

    ? Least intrusion into the lesson. Don?t make a big deal out of it. Remember they?re not doing it to get at you ? they?re just doing it because they feel like it. (Although if you go over the top in your response ? they?ll continue as its fun to get such heavy reactions to something minimal).

    ? Use non verbal messages ? firm eye contact at times, raised eyebrow, gesture, :- so they know that you know what they?re up to. Send a non-verbal message of disapproval but also one of no fuss.

    ? Don?t get hooked-in ? unconsciously they?re either seeking attention, checking out if they can take control here, ? would love a power struggle, maybe they want to impress their peers ? all unconscious goals of misbehaviour, ? gives them a sense of belonging. ? I?m the cheeky one, the naughty one and any such response to these will reinforce the goals of misbehaviour. Just refuse to play their game. You?re the teacher. All kids push the limits. Acknowledge this and refuse to get hooked-in. You have no intention of getting hooked-in to such behaviour but keep your response low key.

    ? Managing attitude. If some concern on your part, take one aside, preferably the leader and send a clear ?I? message e.g., ?When people mess around in class, I am concerned. No attention = low marks. I don?t want that to happen to you. OK!?


    NOTE: As you?ve been heavily reacting to their behaviour ? and you?re going to change your response ? you may find they?ll push you ? just to check if you?re for real. Stay cool. You are the teacher here. Keep focusing on catching them when they do ?it? (anything), right. They just need a gentle reminder and divert by catching them doing it right. No fuss and they?ll settle down.

    BehaviourUK: http://www.behaviouruk.com

    Behavior Management in Education Foundation: http://www.bmef.org/


    checklist https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?messag...

    https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...


    setting up classroom https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    displays https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    We've been putting together a New class pack whch should be avalable for download on www.trinityeducational.co.uk
     
  3. jog_on

    jog_on New commenter

    Thanks bluerose :)
     
  4. lumleylass

    lumleylass New commenter

    Wow! Great work, Bluerose!
     
  5. Thank you!
     
  6. Thank you for taking the time to do this, Bluerose. I'm sure loads of people will find this thread really useful.
     
  7. Great thread thank you.
     
  8. Update: I've compiled everything I suggested, which can be found here: www.teachinglinks.co.uk/handbook.htm

    The next job is to create another file collating the hints and tips on Bluerose's threads. I should be able to add this later on this week.

    Apologies for posting this twice!
     
  9. I always make a publisher files with different coloured retangles and squares to represent furniture in the rooom then move it round so I can get a feel for what can go where. I normally take photos of the room as it takes shape useful to refer to when you are at home thinking about it!
     
  10. Thank you!
     
  11. You might also be interested in a project I started this summer...

    I've collated over 60 different teaching methods, activities and games, the majority of which can be used in any subject. (The list will be added to when I get the chance but probably not immediately).

    You can view the list here: http://docs.google.com/View?docid=dg3mtjfp_12fq9wkn

    If you would like to contribute and share ideas, please email me: teachinglinks@googlemail.com

    It is rough and ready at the moment but please do email me or leave any comments here if you have any constructive criticism.
     
  12. Thank you! That's a fantasitc post! I've transfered it all to PP and am going to use them with my 3 NQTs. :0)
     

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