1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Thinking of getting a dog

Discussion in 'Personal' started by perdita, May 29, 2011.

  1. I'm a chronic insomniac and the doctor has suggested that I take exercise. The only excercise I actually enjoy is walking, but I rarely go because no one else in the family shares my enthusiasm. In a drunken moment last night, I suggested getting a dog as a walking companion. In the cold light of day I'd like to consider whether this is really a sensible idea.
    I'd love a labrador, or probably more sensibly, a labrador cross.
    How much excercise would a dog like that require?
    I work full time, how long can a dog be left unattended?
    How much would a big dog like that cost to feed? What about vets bills?
    Would we need an estate car?
    I've never had a dog before and any words of wisdom would be gratefully received.
     
  2. I'm a chronic insomniac and the doctor has suggested that I take exercise. The only excercise I actually enjoy is walking, but I rarely go because no one else in the family shares my enthusiasm. In a drunken moment last night, I suggested getting a dog as a walking companion. In the cold light of day I'd like to consider whether this is really a sensible idea.
    I'd love a labrador, or probably more sensibly, a labrador cross.
    How much excercise would a dog like that require?
    I work full time, how long can a dog be left unattended?
    How much would a big dog like that cost to feed? What about vets bills?
    Would we need an estate car?
    I've never had a dog before and any words of wisdom would be gratefully received.
     
  3. Get an mp3 player and a treadmill.
     
  4. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    I would have to agree with Bauble
     
  5. Probably a more sensible option, but I won't get fresh air and daylight on a treadmill!
     
  6. You will if you put it in the garden.
     
  7. jacob

    jacob Lead commenter

    there are doggy types on here. basically you should never leave a dog for more than 4, possibly 5 hours. A labrador requires quite a bit of exercise, maybe 2 to 3 hours a day. They only eat about ten quids worth a week, but they are a greedy breed and will eat almost anything they can, and then be prone to being fat. They also can get some congenital health problems.
    In short; don't.
     
  8. If they can only be left for 4 or 5 hours then it's out of the question.
    I thought it was probably a daft idea.
     
  9. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Unless you pay someone to take it for a walk at lunchtime.

    But I would recommend going to a place like Labrador Rescue and getting an older dog, puppy training is difficult when you're working. I recently was very lucky to get a 7 year old Weimaraner, she is so gorgeous. I only work mornings and we have a vey large garden so she gets plenty of play.

     
  10. If you are working full time you shouldn't get a dog. It isn't fair on the animal to leave it alone for long periods of time.
    A Lab needs lots of running around and lots of walking.
     
  11. I certainly wouldn't have the time to dedicate to a puppy, but I wouldn't want a dog that was too old either. Our extremely ancient and well loved cats died recently and that's an experience I'm in no rush to repeat.

     
  12. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    There are doggie daycare places who can look after pets during the day but obviously that adds to the cost of keeping a dog.
    We have two dogs. Insurance is £20 per dog per month. It costs about £80 a year each for their jabs. Food costs about £80 a month each but one has stomach problems so they have expensive good. They aren't cheap to keep but they are worth every penny in terms of the company. We love walking anyway but it is even more fun with the dogs running around and enjoying themselves.
     
  13. Blimey, that's expensive.
    I'm never convinced by these insurance policies. My brother's cat is insured, he was recently diagnosed with some chronic condition (the cat, not my brother) and guess what! that particular condition isn't covered by the policy. Typical.

     
  14. My parents made the mistake of not taking out insurance on our two dogs. They ended up costing thousands when they got ill as their special food was very expensive.
     
  15. I'm sure pet insurance is a sensible idea, but it just seems to me that insurance companies will do anything to avoid paying out.
    We were extremely lucky with our cats. They rarely went to the vets, one was a bit of a fighter when he was young and would get an occasional abscess from an infected wound, the other would get the odd urinary tract infection. Other than that they were extremely healthy and both died in their 20s.
     
  16. Dog walkers locally charge £8 for a 45 minute walk (was looking into it for mine recently but have a friend offering to take him during the day if we need to) - we get round things by hubby coming home at lunchtime if I work all day - I do supply and tend to bagsie all the half-day drips and drabs lots of people don't want.
    Food - we pay about £30 a month for a massive sack of James Wellbeloved which sees us between paydays... insurance - think ours is about £18 a month and apart from wormer/fleaer which lasts the best part of half a year for £20ish, we only have jabs to pay for once a year.
    No regrets getting our guy - indeed we're now on the lookout for number 2 and are making enquiries about retired greyhounds! I've been utterly smitten by the ones I've met out walking - so gentle, dignified and stunning biiiiiiigggg eyes!
    As for insurance - I've got a 10+year old cat (possibly nearer 12 or 13) - never ever had to claim on it as she's resolutely healthy, but I'd still rather have it there as a safety net than a huge bill come in and have to consider her future based on cost rather than quality of life. Have a horrid feeling the dog's going to have hip issues in years to come (he was an ex-poundie so no history or hip scores on him) and so I'm glad the insurance is in place.... it's also something to consider if you're looking at a breed - whether they're prone to things like hip displasia (and I've probably spelt that wrong) and the other issues that can happen within some breeds that escape me at the moment.
    I've had a massive improvement in my mental health since we got the dog - gets me out and about twice a day (although the 6am trudge around the field is less pleasurable at the time and I've mastered the art of walking there with my eyes almost closed and the dog leading the way) and he makes us laugh so much - he's an utter comedy character.
     
  17. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    I can only second that. We would love a dog in our lives, a rescue dog, but we can't: it wouldn't be fair on the dog. Maybe at some point in the future. The way I look at is: for every pet you have, factor in having a 3 year old child.
     
  18. Realistically, this was a lovely idea that just won't work for us at the moment. Perhaps in a few years time I'll be able to afford to go part time and we can reconsider the idea then. In the mean time I plan to contact some charities and see if anyone in my area would like some help with dog walking.
     
  19. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Personally, I can only congratulate you on that decision Perdita [​IMG]
     
  20. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    Don't get a dog, but do get a sturdy dog chain-type lead to dangle and rattle as you walk.
    That way you can go anywhere without worrying about trouble.
    No one will mess with you if they think you have a big fierce dog running loose nearby!
     

Share This Page