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Thinking back...

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Marshall, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. Marshall

    Marshall Established commenter

    Just been reading old posts and one of them mentioned paraffin heaters before we had central heating.
    I remember no central heating at all when I was young. We had a coal fire and dad constantly shouted at us if we didn't close the door. All the family spent every evening together in one room.
    We didn't go to our bedrooms to play music, watch TV, etc like they do now - it was too cold! We had hot water bottles in our bed and had to scrape ice off our windows in the morning.
    I am not old - this was in the 60s!
    What can everyone else remember?
     
  2. Marshall

    Marshall Established commenter

    Just been reading old posts and one of them mentioned paraffin heaters before we had central heating.
    I remember no central heating at all when I was young. We had a coal fire and dad constantly shouted at us if we didn't close the door. All the family spent every evening together in one room.
    We didn't go to our bedrooms to play music, watch TV, etc like they do now - it was too cold! We had hot water bottles in our bed and had to scrape ice off our windows in the morning.
    I am not old - this was in the 60s!
    What can everyone else remember?
     
  3. We didn't have any means to play music until the early 70's (I was the very proud owner of a DIscassette). We were talking about paraffin heaters the other day - we had a tall round one, what a fab smell , but I don't remember being told to be careful with it. You could look through a window to see the flame. I remember sitting right in front of it listening to Eleanor Rigby. We were laughing only yesterday about Carnation, you had it on your tinned fruit and it wasn't opened like a can, but your Dad punched two triangular holes in it at either side of the top. It was a Dad job, we thought, because the implement used to do this was also a bottle opener.
    Vividly remember linoed floors and jack frost on the windows in the winter. We didn't think anything of it at the time but it must have been very cold!
     
  4. Exactly the same as you. Marshall. My bedroom was far too cold in the winter. We had those Crital metal framed windows. On a good day you had to chip the ice of the inside and your tounge would stick to the metal frame when your tried to lick it, which I did quite often.
    In the early 70's i managed to blag the black and white tv , that we used when camping, for my bedroom. My remote was half a fishing rod which could be used to poke the channels over without leaving the warmth of my bed. :¬))
     
  5. Ah, those were the days. eh? I think everyone tried the old tongue thing, didn't it rip off your tastebuds?
     

  6. I was far too poor to have "tastebuds" . Nigel, up the road had taste buds but , then again, his Dad did work for the council.
     
  7. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter


    Chipping ice off the windows - it's only been a few years ago since that was the norm for me! No heating back then, no double glazing, no hot water.

    As a child I remember....
    'real' fires (which terrified me!)
    visiting grandparents who only had an outside loo....
    no phone in the house - and the button A/B phone in the red phonebox...
    the slipper/plimsol/ruler/cane at school...
    one (rented) TV in the house - black/white and two/three channels....
    'old' money...and no 'new' money ever felt as satisfying as a chunky 3d piece...
    wearing a knitted swimsuit....(wish I could forget that one...not a good look when wet, heavy and dragging round your knees!)...

    and I'm not that old...honestly!
     
  8. My sons think I was born and brought up in a Hovis advert. Until I was 6 we had no bathroom and the toilet was outside in the yard.
    Anyone else attend Sunday School? I always assumed my parents were a pious couple and it took me a few years to realise that they had other priorities on a Sunday afternoon.
     
  9. Sunday School was Sunday mornings for me. Sunday afternoon was reserved for visiting Aunty Edith. I had to wear a stuffy " smart" jumper and she had a beard.
     
  10. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    I never did understand why as children we all were packed off to Sunday School ....but neither Mum nor Birthdad ever went to Church!

    Sunday afternoons we sometimes went for a walk which was boring. Or we had visitors which was worse...I had to wear a skirt instead of the shorts I usually wore. And if I had fallen over too often and had scabby legs I had to cover them with long socks or *shudders* lacy tights!
     
  11. Honey Loop

    Honey Loop New commenter

    Visiting my grandparents and playing with the Redifusion box.
    Taking about a fortnight to get out of the habit of standing up in preparation to turn over the tv, despite having a brand new remote controlled set. Before that, my siblings and I *were* the remote control.

     
  12. Marshall

    Marshall Established commenter

    Outside loos - forgot about those. When i visited my grandparents we had to go down a long dark passage and into the loo (on our own even at 5! Imagine that nowadays!). Izal toilet paper (if we were lucky) and newspaper if not. The spiders were enormous and you couldn't lock the door.

     
  13. Marshall

    Marshall Established commenter

    Plus - no record player but a huge radio - we used to stand on this to serve dinner through the hatch from the tiny kitchen - the only time we ate at the dining table.
    I dreamt about it all last night - cooking on a small cooker in a tiny kitchen with no heating. Perhaps that's what led to this topic!
     
  14. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    and no fridges....food was kept in the panty by the door
    shopping every day for perishables....and no plasstic bags...you got greaseproof paper which went in toa paper bag.Bicuits bought loose and takeaways once week if rich enough....fish and ships 1sh3d,,but you asked for all the sharp bits off the batter lol

     
  15. One of my jobs was to "snick" upstairs (a la Billy Whiz) and turn on the electric blankets at about 9 o'clock.
     
  16. I remeber all of the above, except for keeping the food in the panty. This strikes me as a little louche for my non-conformist, chapel-attending, pursed-lips type family...
     
  17. Most people had pantries but each to their own ;)

    I remember we had an old B&W tv which had a dial like a radio and you ahd to get the right frequency to watch TOTP. My sister had it in her room and we had a new colour tele downstairs. Something which I don't remember but am reminded of constantly is that my Dad bought one of the first VCRs with a remote control, which was actually connected by a long lead to the recorder and I once put my toast in the slot when I was a baby and broke it! Dad will never let me forget that!
     
  18. Marshall

    Marshall Established commenter

    Fish and chips in paper - once a week and the best bits were the 'scraps'!
    We had a fridge[​IMG]
     
  19. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    Electric blankets? Blimey you were posh Bauble - hot water bottles!
    It was only when I was at uni and had to do an essay about housing conditions that I realised I'd spent the first 12 years of my life in a slum.
    No running hot water, toilet outside in a shared yard, tin bath in front of the fire and in the winter all 4 of us in the same bedroom because it was the only one warm enough.
     
  20. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    we didn't have a fridge but a pantry with a cold shelf.The neighbours got big bottles of pop from the pop man but we weren't allowed!
    In winter dad would light a little paraffin lamp and put it next to the toilet pipe which had been lagged.The bedroom floor was lino and we too scrapped the ice off the inside of the window.
    In winter he snow was a lot deeper and lasted longer
    We had a twin tub washing machine but no telephone.
     

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