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Thinking About Becoming a Drama Teacher

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by MrJackHeuze, May 4, 2012.

  1. Hi, m new to TES and I am thinking about carrers I want to persue. And everything that I have thought off, I can do as a teacher. But there just one thing that is putting me off, going to university if there is anyone out there who would be kind enough to help put my mind at rest, may it be you hate it to or you think its great please honest experience nd opinion. Finally the reason I want to be a teacher is not only my love of drama and to educate young people on the best subject ever, but I hate secondary school and I want kids to enjoy going to school or at least drama. Is this a good reason to become a teacher, if there are any teachers in secondary schools could they please give me a dail routine of a teacher (Prefered drama teacher). And if anyone wants to give me some useful and helpful infomation it would be appreciated what ever it may be.
    Thank you
    Jack
     
  2. Hi, m new to TES and I am thinking about carrers I want to persue. And everything that I have thought off, I can do as a teacher. But there just one thing that is putting me off, going to university if there is anyone out there who would be kind enough to help put my mind at rest, may it be you hate it to or you think its great please honest experience nd opinion. Finally the reason I want to be a teacher is not only my love of drama and to educate young people on the best subject ever, but I hate secondary school and I want kids to enjoy going to school or at least drama. Is this a good reason to become a teacher, if there are any teachers in secondary schools could they please give me a dail routine of a teacher (Prefered drama teacher). And if anyone wants to give me some useful and helpful infomation it would be appreciated what ever it may be.
    Thank you
    Jack
     
  3. Sorry to be pedantic but a prime requirement of a teacher is the ability to spell (or at least have the good sense to check spellings) and the ability to write coherent sentences: you seem to have a problem with both. Even drama teachers have to mark student work and write reports. Teaching today is an all graduate profession so you can't do it without a degree and that applies to drama teachers as well. I would question the motives of someone who professes to 'hate secondary school', why on earth would you want to teach in one? If, even as a student, after five years in secondary education you can't figure out what drama teachers actually do on a daily basis then you must have been walking about with your eyes tightly closed. Why don't you go and talk to one?
     
  4. Welcome to TES. I hope the above response didn't put you off. Obviously at this stage of your life you have lots of options open to you and it is good that you are thinking seriously about them. If you love drama, then perhaps that's where you should start. If you can get on a course where you will be doing something you love, that's the best start on your future career; you can decide later on what shape you think your future should take. You obviously have real enthusiasm for the subject and feel you could enjoy passing on this love of drama to young people. Young people need teachers who want to make a difference and want to help them get the most out of school. Just because you have had a bad experience in your own school doesn't mean it would be like that working in one, particularly if you found a school where you would be working alongside other staff who have the same enthusiasm for their subjects and for teaching.

    If you don't fancy talking to the drama teachers in your own school, could you ask your careers adviser to put you in touch with one in another school? This might help you understand the job a bit more.

    However, I don't think you should necessarily think of this as the only reason to study drama. A job as a drama teacher will not be your only option at the end. I work in a special school and we regularly get theatre companies and freelance actors in to run workshops and activities with our pupils. They get all the enjoyment of teaching drama but don't have the rest of the job to deal with. It may not pay as well as teaching but if you're successful, it could pay very well indeed.

    There are lots of other careers for which drama would be an advantage too. There is so much team working and communication involved that you will be developing essential skills for any job. My point is that if you love drama, then continue studying it and take the next few years to mull over your options whilst you're studying. You'll enjoy it, get a lot from it and will be older too - so then you might feel more confident about making the best decision for you. Whilst you're on a course, I'm sure schools would be very happy to have you volunteer to help out in drama. This might also help you decide whether it's really for you, particularly if you can go into a few different types of schools in order to compare them.

    I understand what the other poster was saying but I am concerned that this could have really disheartened you. You've done really well to take the initiative to come on here and ask for advice. I hope I have been able to help you. Please post any further questions you may have. I wish you all the best in whatever you decide to do. Don't let anyone put you off doing what you love.
     
  5. Thanks alot for that, you really have made me happy :)
     
  6. Sorry but I think this post is a hoax. The writer is pretending to be practically illiterate in order to wind us all up.
    And, if I am wrong, then I don't think you will get through university.
     
  7. And if you are wrong, is that really the message you want to deliver - so bluntly - to someone who could be one of your students? If you are right and it is a hoax, then it's really no harm done and I don't see too many people being wound up. If there is even a chance you are wrong, I think it is best not to crush a young person.
     
  8. Totally agree with every word of this. You DO need a good standard of English to write competent reports, letters to parents, etc., as well as to mark spelling, punctuation and grammar in students' work. And if you hate secondary school, you'll hate spending your career in one. The romance of teaching drama a la 'Dead Poets Society' is very different from the day-to-day reality.
     
  9. One of the best reasons.

    I also hated secondary school. I think that makes me a better teacher.

    Is it a coincidence that your name sounds like J'accuse?
     
  10. I am so fed up with this attitude! This is why we have teachers who cannot teach! Not everyone has a high enough standard of education to become a teacher.
    It is not WRONG to not be good at something but if teachers never tell the truth and always give false praise then we end up with young adults who have no idea of their own abilities.
    He asked. I did not seek him out. His post shows that he has a long way to go before he SHOULD be allowed to train to be a teacher. However, if senteachinginfo is representative of the current cohort of teachers, then the next generation of teachers will be even less well-educated!
    God help us all!
     
  11. Please explain why.
     
  12. I agree that not everyone has a high enough standard of education to become a teacher. However, I don't believe learning stops at 16 and I do believe it is possible to take further courses to bring one's standard of education up to the required level.

    I also agree it is not wrong to tell students the truth. I do, however, believe very strongly that it is absolutely wrong to be rude and convey this message so bluntly that it robs a young person of their self-esteem and dignity.

    I agree that that this young man has issues with his literacy which will need addressing. This is something he can continue to have support with at college. To write him off as never having any chance of improving his literacy is not something I believe anyone has the right to do.

    Yes, he asked. He asked politely for advice. Okay so you gave him your opinion. Very bluntly. Would you speak that way to one of your students? Honestly? Would you want someone to speak that way to your own child?

    As I have no influence on who is accepted for teacher training, I don't see how my views (which were regarding how to speak to students, not regarding the high level of literacy needed to be a teacher) could ever have any effect on the level of education of the next generation of teachers.

    If consonant is representative of the current cohort of teachers, then the next generation of school leavers will have even lower self-esteem and aspirations.
     
  13. Sorry consonant, I got mixed up and thought you'd written the second post, which was the most blunt. Your own response was quite blunt but not as much as post 2.
     
  14. I am currently a 20 year old student studying to become a teacher. I hated secondary school because of the pure arrogance from teachers like you that degrade people due to their ability to do things! The reason why I want to become a teacher? to prove to students that not all teachers are narrow minded, manipulative bullies that aim to bully rather than teach! And I think you should seriously consider your profession.
     
  15. I'm not sure who KH1703 is referring to but many of the replies on this thread assume (quite rightly) that the OP is a wind up.

    Jack Heuze = J'accuse.

    Geddit?

    (BTW - you can't "degrade" someone. You can "denigrate" them, if you wish).
     

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