1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Things you would say to younger people

Discussion in 'Personal' started by oldsomeman, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Based on what I have read in a paper, old folks are asked to write advice to young people on white board
    If you had to write advice what might you say?
    As an example, one said spend all your money
    Another said keep your legs closed.

    Mine.
    Work hard, but be prepared to try different things to see if you enjoy it better than what you are doing.
     
  2. littlejackhorner

    littlejackhorner Senior commenter

    Be adventurous and take a few risks before you settle down with a partner and a mortgage.
    This is based on advice I would give to my younger self!
     
    oldsomeman and Oscillatingass like this.
  3. WB

    WB Star commenter

    Don't be a teacher.
     
  4. Katzenjammer

    Katzenjammer Lead commenter

    The things you end up regretting are not the things you did, so much as the things you ought to have done but lacked the courage to do.

    Not a great deal matters, and nothing matters a great deal in the end; the goal of all our lives is six feet of earth, and that fairly quickly.

    This, too, will pass.....
     
    Rott Weiler and littlejackhorner like this.
  5. mothorchid

    mothorchid Star commenter

    You won't ever regret your extravagance, but you may well regret your economies.
    But
    Get into the habit of saving some money each month.
    I fear I may be a bit divided on this...
     
  6. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter


    Get off that phone and read this ******* whiteboard.
     
  7. WB

    WB Star commenter

    Give thy thoughts no tongue,
    Nor any unproportioned thought his act.
    Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.
    Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
    Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel;
    But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
    Of each new-hatch’d, unfledged comrade. Beware
    Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in,
    Bear’t that the opposed may beware of thee.
    Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice;
    Take each man’s censure, but reserve thy judgment.
    Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
    But not express’d in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
    For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
    And they in France of the best rank and station
    Are of a most select and generous chief in that.
    Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
    For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
    And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
    This above all: to thine ownself be true,
    And it must follow, as the night the day,
    Thou canst not then be false to any man.

    Anyway, that's the list I just thought of the in last few minutes all by myself
     
  8. colpee

    colpee Star commenter

    Forget old people with whiteboards - just go and live your life!


    Like they would need to be told:confused:
     
  9. colacao17

    colacao17 Lead commenter

    Keep yer ******' mask on over your nose!
     
  10. colacao17

    colacao17 Lead commenter

    I didn't swear! That was a tribute to Fr Ted.
     
    Jamvic and oldsomeman like this.
  11. Ivartheboneless

    Ivartheboneless Star commenter

    As wih WB above: stay solvent, do not get into debt, if you can't afford it don't buy it.
     
    hendo2015, ilovesooty, Nebka and 5 others like this.
  12. modelmaker

    modelmaker Star commenter

    My father wasn't a great giver of advice, but I remember he said on more than one occasion "You don't want to believe everything they tell you at school, son."

    There was an occasion when our metalwork teacher had set some homework asking that we draw and label the various features of a twist drill, to note alongside each, its purpose and most specifically what the point angle and the helix angle had to be. The last bits were, I think, to see if we remembered the numbers he'd drummed into us during his lesson on the twist drill.

    I was fine with that, since anything technical fascinated me and I listened intently during metalwork lessons. There was one thing that puzzled me though. Why did the point angle on a drill have to be 118°. My childhood mind rationed that it would be easier to mark out and make a drill gauge if it was 120°, so there must be some special reason why it had to be 118°. I asked my dad, who seemed puzzled. Having explained what the teacher had taught us, my dad said "When you go to school tomorrow, tell your teacher he's a bleedin' idiot who don't know 5hit from clay." (sic)

    He then explained why the point angle depends on the material being drilled and its thickness and that although the helix angle is fairly standard on jobber drills they make drills with faster or slower helix angles for use when drilling more exotic materials than steel.

    I didn't actually pass his comments on to the teacher, because I was wise enough to know it would result in a thick ear, but now I reflect back, between the pair of them, I learned a lesson that would later be invaluable to me.

    I think the advice I would give to kids would be along these lines:

    You get one life, so don't waste it doing what other people want you to do. Don't let anyone bully you. Don't get trapped in a relationship that isn't working or a career you grow to loathe. Don't waste money on gimmicks, but don't be fightened to spend it on stuff that will make you better off in the long-term. Ask for tools as presents. So long as you have exactly the right tool to do a job, sod's law will ensure you'll never be called upon to use it. Such tools are only ever required when you don't possess them.
     
    Lalad likes this.
  13. WB

    WB Star commenter

    Never listen to the advice of older people, would be my advice to young people- I doubt they'd listen.
     
  14. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Temptation may not come your way more than once...so go and enjoy it if you can!
     
    littlejackhorner and Doitforfree like this.
  15. Ezzie

    Ezzie Occasional commenter

    Three pieces of advice I gave my daughter:
    3. Wear perfume every day. Just because.
    2. Look after your skin.
    1. Work hard at school; get useful qualifications to get a good job so that you don’t have to rely on a man for financial stability.
    And to both my children; 4. pay extra in to a pension now so you’ll be able to enjoy retirement without having to constantly worry about money.
    I’m there with the first 2 but sadly didn’t think about the last 2 until circumstances... Well, enough said.
     
  16. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    My advice would be not to worry about what you look like. If it bothers you just don't look in a mirror and then you don't know what you look like. Be happy. Don't take life too seriously. Know what makes you happy, and don't assume that it will be anything big. The trick is to be honest. Don't think you should like what other people say they like.

    We had a hymn at our wedding which had the line 'leap and sing in all I do'. Well, I don't always manage to keep a smile on my face, but I try really hard to be cheerful and positive and to see the good in things. Because there's lots there.
     
  17. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    As someone with a perfume allergy I would have to disagree. I'd ban it if I were up to me! And your skin will look after itself. You're totally right about the pension though.
     
    monicabilongame and Ezzie like this.
  18. lunarita

    lunarita Lead commenter

    Pick a job that will make you happy over one which will make you rich.
    Buy the best iron you can afford.
     
  19. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Sadly, very sadly, I would have to agree.
     
  20. littlejackhorner

    littlejackhorner Senior commenter

    I would now but not to my younger self. I really enjoyed teaching in the 80s and early 90s. I certainly wouldn't recommend it now.
     

Share This Page