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Things supply teachers hate about class teachers

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Quentin2, Feb 16, 2010.

  1. Have fun moaning about my spelling . . . spotted the misteaks (ha, ha) too late.
     
  2. moggycat

    moggycat New commenter

    [​IMG]
    Great answer. I've done both too and have seen positives and negatives of both. We tell children not to be petty, but in my opinion
    , some of the comments on this thread are! Why do we have to make digs at each other? Like we don't get enough of that sort of thing from parents etc!
     
  3. moggycat

    moggycat New commenter

    oops, didn't mean to press quote!
     
  4. A few people in this thread have mentioned that doing supply helped them to get a permanent job at a school they supplied at. If this happened to you was it through the Local Authority Supply Register or through an agency that you did your supply? Does anyone have any advice (other than doing a good job, obviously) on how to turn doing supply in to a longer term post?
     
  5. becky70

    becky70 Occasional commenter

    Neither - I worked for my school directly. Don't have a permanent post either but a temp one. Problem with agencies is that if you join the school on contract then the school has to pay the agency a fee.
    It's really just down to doing a good job. Also, larger schools may be a better bet than smaller ones as there will always be people leaving, going on maternity leave etc.
     
  6. When I started on supply there were no agencies- but I got my first perm job doing supply via the authority- school liked me and I liked them and I stayed there for several years until I was made redundant (falling numbers-last in- first out.) Got my next job through a contact I had made on supply and got the job- no interview for either post.
    I didn't like this thread when it first appeared and am sorry to see it re-emerge.
    As for what can you do on supply- a good job of course but be visible! Go to the staffroom, chat to teachers, always seek out the head, deputy, whoever at the end of the day to say goodbye and give a positive message about your day. I know some schools are friendlier than others but be confident and friendly and make contacts.
     
  7. chocolatelover

    chocolatelover New commenter

    I've done supply for over a year, both on agency and through schools paid by LEA and my understanding is you get paid for a day's supply (or half a day), therefore you do a day, that means marking the work you have given to the children. Having a job now (and and NQT) and when you look back at work done by supply, if it hasn't been marked thenhow do you know how much input they have had!
    I never left until the work was marked and it never took me more than an hour to do it. And I would not expect to come back to school after a course or after being off ill, to find work not marked by supply.

     
  8. I respectfully advise you to get a better agency then, as every agency I've worked for, or LA, or directly working for a school I've been paid until at least 4:30pm, which is long enough to mark the work even when it's a late finishing school. (From a long time supplier - Make it easier on yourself, mark as you go along in the lesson (especially with the guided group you are working with), use peer assessment, work smarter, not harder or longer - if you're staying that late everynight, it doesn't make you a good teacher, or a good supply teacher, you will just wear yourself out and not want to accept jobs anymore.)
     
  9. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    You're really fortunate the happypixie, my LA pays for 10 mins extra am & pm so 20 mins if you do a full day, but your advice about working smarter is spot on, use self/peer marking as much as possible, buy inked stamps, anything to shorten the process.
     
  10. i know how you feel but oh well
     
  11. If supply teaching was permanent it would be a good job. I worked at a large school for a while last year with an unused staffroom, fortunately I took in a nice pack of chocolate biscuits which I donated to the first base I found and parked my self in during the intervals and lunchtimes, which helped me to settle in nicely. Also took my DVD collection of interesting documentaries when I kept getting PSE classes where the work left was 'let them do homework or study.'
     
  12. Oh dear sorry just realised this is on the primary forum, sorry!
     
  13. I totally agree it is unprofessional and sad going on forums and crying about it.
     
  14. andrew07

    andrew07 Occasional commenter

    (Rubbing hands with glee) Well, number one, a few of us full time teachers and adminstrators may add to the fact that we hate it when supply teachers come in, think they are the boss, just sit and play with their phones, never do what you've been asked to do.

    Number two, the dear children need to bring their own pencils. There should be no welfare in the classroom. I mean afterall us taxpayers are funding free education anyway and so that lazy media studies sixth formers can go to sixth form via EMA.

    Number three, don't f***ing tell me or anybody else where to start their own thread.

    And, number four, perhaps the education establishment will be pleased when YOU quit replacing regualr full time qualified teachers. I know you say you are qualified but, many aren't.

    Now, stick that up your bum and twirl on it.
     
  15. I hate it when supply teachers moan about clutter on my desk when I didnt know I was going to be ill and they would need to use it.
     
  16. Exactly. Never mind the fact that it's my desk and I can clutter it as much as I bloody well want to.
     
  17. inky

    inky Lead commenter


    (Rubbing hands with glee) Well, number one, a few of us full time teachers and adminstrators may add to the fact that we hate it when supply teachers come in, think they are the boss, just sit and play with their phones, never do what you've been asked to do.

    Number two, the dear children need to bring their own pencils. There should be no welfare in the classroom. I mean afterall us taxpayers are funding free education anyway and so that lazy media studies sixth formers can go to sixth form via EMA.

    "Number three, don't f***ing tell me or anybody else where to start their own thread."
    Oh dear. What an angry young man this is.
    I did a long spell on supply because of family circumstances - dad's stroke. relocation, etc . Fortunately fo me, I was a teacher with eleven years exerience under my belt.

    "And, number four, perhaps the education establishment will be pleased when YOU quit replacing regualr full time qualified teachers. I know you say you are qualified but, many aren't."
    I'm as qualified as you, dear, though I don't actually care. If you're going to be nasty. so be it.

     
  18. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I don't want enayone to muddle my reply with thsat of the angry Young Man;
     
  19. inky

    inky Lead commenter

     
  20. Room_101

    Room_101 New commenter

    Imust say that having skipped VERY BRIEFLY thu this thread much of it seems extremely lame and hostile, to be fair thought the title of the thread kind of encouraged that.

    a better topic would really have been "what i would really like to see as a supply teacher" which surely would have left less of us burning and more of us better informed?

    i'm currently on supply and would agree with one earlier post that proclaimed that it's a great job: it is.

    we often get the chance to relate to pupils in a way that is unfortunately missed by our much more burdened full time colleagues - this can lead to important welfare issues being uncovered and addressed which otherwise would have gone unchecked for one thing.

    one thing i would love to see more of is adequate but not over extensive cover notes. I don't just want a LO myself, ot worse "they know what they are doing and just need to get on with it" a recipe for disaster!! (surely its obvious why, and yet i get it quite regularly). On the other hand reams and reams of instructions - including as one person put it 'complex carousel activities' are also a real pain: often we've just walked in the room - how can you expect us to choreograph 30 strangers when 1) they don't want to do it and are already looking on this a free lesson and 2) we dont even know their names!!!

    so i would agree that a bit more forethought with the details of the lessons would be a gret a thing, apart from that i dont have much to complain about, except my experience of certain individuals......
     

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