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They don't mention them at interviews

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by the hippo, May 5, 2011.

  1. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    I am sure that many of our younger colleagues (and maybe some of our older colleagues) are very excited about their new jobs in Africa and Asia. For some strange reason, at interview school principals sometimes forget to say anything about the jabs you will need. If you are off to Kenya or China in September, my advice would be to get to a doctor and see what injections you going to need. For starters, the jabs for yellow fever and hepatitis (is that spelled correctly?) are usually a good idea.
    There is a lot of garbage writtten about malaria. Yes, you can get it. Yes, it can be fatal. The important thing is not to take Larium. It mucks up your blood test (and you will need a blood test straight away if you think that you do have malaria). Larium can also cause mental problems (depression, suicidal thoughts - even worse than a really bad staff meeting). No, the thing to do is to stay away from water near sundown (when all of the mozzies are feeling thirsty for your blood) and use good mosquito nets. Long, loose clothes are better protection than shorts and skimpy tops. Use loads of insect repellant (one with plenty of DEET) and go for a blood test if you do think that you may have malaria. Don't forget that the symptoms may not appear until a week or even ten days after you have been bitten. If the hospital does tell you that you have malaria, then you will have a few bad days. With the right medication and plenty of rest, you should be back on your feet again in a week or so. If your pee turns black, then you have what is called "blackwater fever" and you will probably die.
    Bilharzia is also very nasty and can be fatal too. The main thing to do is to stay away from water that looks stagnant or a bit dodgy. Flowing water and sea water are okay.
     
  2. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    I am sure that many of our younger colleagues (and maybe some of our older colleagues) are very excited about their new jobs in Africa and Asia. For some strange reason, at interview school principals sometimes forget to say anything about the jabs you will need. If you are off to Kenya or China in September, my advice would be to get to a doctor and see what injections you going to need. For starters, the jabs for yellow fever and hepatitis (is that spelled correctly?) are usually a good idea.
    There is a lot of garbage writtten about malaria. Yes, you can get it. Yes, it can be fatal. The important thing is not to take Larium. It mucks up your blood test (and you will need a blood test straight away if you think that you do have malaria). Larium can also cause mental problems (depression, suicidal thoughts - even worse than a really bad staff meeting). No, the thing to do is to stay away from water near sundown (when all of the mozzies are feeling thirsty for your blood) and use good mosquito nets. Long, loose clothes are better protection than shorts and skimpy tops. Use loads of insect repellant (one with plenty of DEET) and go for a blood test if you do think that you may have malaria. Don't forget that the symptoms may not appear until a week or even ten days after you have been bitten. If the hospital does tell you that you have malaria, then you will have a few bad days. With the right medication and plenty of rest, you should be back on your feet again in a week or so. If your pee turns black, then you have what is called "blackwater fever" and you will probably die.
    Bilharzia is also very nasty and can be fatal too. The main thing to do is to stay away from water that looks stagnant or a bit dodgy. Flowing water and sea water are okay.
     
  3. Thanks Hippo, all of this is good advice. The other thing they don't mention either is how bloomin' expensive it is to get all the jabs. For a family of four we're looking at £550 for our jabs! Got back from the surgery today and needed a lie down in a dark room! [​IMG]
     
  4. yasimum

    yasimum New commenter

    OK, I can't and I will never be able to spell haemorrhagic.
     
  5. The spelling is easy once you look it up. Pretty sure I'm still not pronouncing it right, though.

    I am still looking for a doctor with nearly a decade of experience.....

     
  6. LOL Yasimum - it's a stinker for sure :) to spell and to have (I would think)
    I agree doctors can give better medical advice than us...however, I think you would struggle to find a doc in the UK that has had dengue, or malaria or any of the other things we are talking about....
    Not that it makes us experts, but it does mean we can be empathetic to others regarding it.
    good luck loops and basically take anything that is going! lol
     
  7. yasimum

    yasimum New commenter

    Very true. After I left hospital and went for a follow up with my GP because I was still feeling so rough, the first thing he said is that he has never seen a case of dengue fever in his life. I had to track down advice from James Cook University in FN Queensland. At least however, they can do blood tests and isolate the strain etc.
    THis is going from bad to worse but the other thing with things like dengue and other tropical illnesses is that they can leave you very susceptible to other illnesses whilst your immune system is recovering. I contracted another virus called cytomegalovirus whilst I was still ill with the dengue so you can see why I am very gun shy about it. Just be careful, I wasn't.
     
  8. CanLah

    CanLah New commenter

    re dengue - just look at the published lists in Malaysia, Sing, etc and see how many more cases there are year on year and also the death rates. Because of all the construction there's a lot more pools of water for the nasty little stripey mossies to live in. Whole family had it last year - don't want it again!!
     
  9. Thank you, you too!

    Which immunisations have you had?
     
  10. Jaupua

    Jaupua New commenter

    I got mine free at the local GP. It is what the Beeb would hysterically describe as a 'post code lottery' in broken/frozen/rip-off/fake Britain.

    I would advise anyone thinking of going to SE Asia to get a Rabies Vaccination. It's not classed as essential in a lot of countries, but if you do get bitten by a dog over there, you will be ******** it waiting for the frothing and general madness to ensue.

    That is, if you are anything like me.
     
  11. You're not completely covered even with the rabies jab. If you do get bitten you'll still require 2 follow up shots.
     

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