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The word "chav"

Discussion in 'Personal' started by JRTowner, Jun 19, 2011.

  1. My blood is about to boil over so just need to let steam off on here rather than head into WW3!
    I really have a problem when people who have had a privilged life turn and condemn others because they are "chavs" (in their eyes at least). Why is it acceptable to run others down because their dress sense is different, they have less money, live in a poorer area or speak differently? Obviously it's not but so many people do and I am desperate to blow my stack at someone. Like I said I won't because a, it's pointless and b, it would cause an almighty row.
    GRRRRRRR.

    Anyone else feel the same?
     
  2. My blood is about to boil over so just need to let steam off on here rather than head into WW3!
    I really have a problem when people who have had a privilged life turn and condemn others because they are "chavs" (in their eyes at least). Why is it acceptable to run others down because their dress sense is different, they have less money, live in a poorer area or speak differently? Obviously it's not but so many people do and I am desperate to blow my stack at someone. Like I said I won't because a, it's pointless and b, it would cause an almighty row.
    GRRRRRRR.

    Anyone else feel the same?
     
  3. Chavs do not have to be poor, the way chav is used around my area is to describe someone who is flaunting, or trying to flaunt an image of wealth.
    Some of the chavviest people I have seen are those with the 2 convertible mercedes, head to toe in gucci and spend £100's a week in beauty salons with the effect being a shade of nuclear orange! Have children called chanel and mercedes and go on holiday to St Tropez and Marbella.

     
  4. Chav didn't exist as a word when I left the UK.
    Chav, to me, is the underclass. Those who have no desire to ever work, who breed without a pause but have no idea about family dynamics or what children need and will expect the state to provide, provide, provide. They have no ambition to change their lifestyle.
    Dress sense, money and regional dialects have nothing to do with it.
    And working class is something very different to chav.
    But I am afraid I can spot a chav - it is someone we from the working class would prefer to avoid.

     
  5. Yes, I do. It seems to me that a whole group of people are subject to discrimination (is there another word for it?) because they aren't as privilaged. Thankfully we don't get too much of it where I live but I'm aware of a big problem with this sort of behaviour in a town near me, where out-and-out bullying takes place against so-called "chavs".
    There was an article in the Guardian (if I remember correctly) recently about this. I'll see if I can find it because it was quite interesting.

     
  6. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    Polly Toynbee
    I thought it was tripe, she thinks chav means working class.
    The last thing a chav would do is work.

     
  7. And as I said - the working class want nothing to do with chavs.
     
  8. Chav, to me, is not a word I use


    It would appear that people use the term in different ways

    Surely the intent behind the word is more relevant than the word



    The idea that it is only the "privileged" that look at others in a disparaging way is a fallacy
     
  9. Nor me.
    That does not mean I do not have an understanding, albeit my own, of what constitutes a chav.
    As I said, when I left the UK, the word did not exist.
    I agree with this also. Society also has a lot of "inverted snobs".
     
  10. I think the equivilants when I was at school (and not all that long ago!) were *** (male) and Shazzers (female). Summed up a general attitude, rather than soci-economic status. And definately not working class- much of the attitude had to do with avoiding work as far as one could.
    Then somewhere in the last few years, "Chav" crept in.
    I think the contempt is for their attitude towards life, rather than their wealth. (Although I suspect there is resentment for the fact that the wealth they have comes from the rest of us paying taxes.)
    Very true, I think, that the real working class would be appalled to be linked in anyway to Chavs.
    It was desperately fashionable in certain groups to be a Chav when I was in school; the school I'm now in, despite having much the same sort of social class (middle, largely- surely putting a cat in the pigeons at the suggestion that it's working classes who are drawn to this sort of loutish behaviour), has no such aspirations. They all want to be like people from TOWIE now :|
     
  11. Agreed. Just thinking about what things were like when I was a young person and I suppose that we did a similar thing to those we perceived as the 'underclass' (what a horrid term) by calling them Gypsies. I can clearly remember being told not to associate with a certain group of people because they were Gypsies. In fact, they weren't! I wasn't the only one encouraged to marginalise people in this way and it was our parents/grandparents who were telling us to be that way. Obviously, I'm not proud of having taken part in that.

     
  12. Yup, that is what we called them (from Sharon - apologies to all decent Sharons out there). Also known as Trazzers (from Tracey).
    Lads were known as Waynes.

     
  13. The way someone has used it to me fairly recently was indeed derogatory and meant people who have not had a private education and were clearly of the working class. The individual does not seem capable of understanding that by classifying all working class people as chavs is tantamount to discrimination.
    I agree with the poster who referred to those with money but no style (class?) may be considered "chavs" - although I still hate the word. I often tell the kids I teach that money does not buy class or style so they would be better off trying to cultivate those qualities rather than condemning those who are poor.
     
  14. We also had the term "townie".
    Although considering we were all from a town, a bit daft.
    But "those kind of people" lived "down town".
     
  15. That person is an ignoramus.
     
  16. I know. I really really want to go mad but I am swallowing it down.
    Oh this is the same person who told me all of the best teachers work in private education!!!
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Sorry- lads were known as Bar ries. Not sure why it bleeped THAT one out.
    We had "townies" as well but that was a sort of wannabe to the above. Usually the ones who were a good season or two behind in trends.

     
  18. LOL - that is TES history!

     
  19. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    Barriies is a banned word because we hounded the poor woman to her death.

     
  20. Why

    That person has an interpretation of the term "chav" ... a different interpretation to the ones on this thread but ... how is it discrimination?
     

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