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The Use of Mini White Boards

Discussion in 'Science' started by johntyjohno, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. Hello Everyone,
    I'm loving the use of MWBs at the minute. I've just got a new set and I'd forgotten how good they are.
    I was just looking for different ideas on how to use them. At the minute I just go for the classic 1,2,3 show me.
    One idea that I've just seen is pupils using mini MWBs to create their own keywords - then arranging these into a diamond 9. I'm going to get some white paper laminated up so I can have a go at this one myself.
    Would be great to hear other people's ideas.
    Cheers
     
  2. Hello Everyone,
    I'm loving the use of MWBs at the minute. I've just got a new set and I'd forgotten how good they are.
    I was just looking for different ideas on how to use them. At the minute I just go for the classic 1,2,3 show me.
    One idea that I've just seen is pupils using mini MWBs to create their own keywords - then arranging these into a diamond 9. I'm going to get some white paper laminated up so I can have a go at this one myself.
    Would be great to hear other people's ideas.
    Cheers
     
  3. I love to use them for balancing equations, the students don't get so frustrated about crossing things out!!
     
  4. Rhysboy

    Rhysboy New commenter

    They are very good for electric circuits, drawing chemical formulae and structures, in fact I once did a lesson where the students did all their writing on the white boards, including the plenary.
    Despite showing that they had all learned something in the lesson, I was worried that there was nothing in their books about the lesson and I might get in trouble at the faculty book review!


     
  5. I used yesterday with Y13, drawing out the Born Haber cycle - they commented that they like using the MWB first as it is easy to correct mistakes - a correct copy can then be transferred to their books....
    I also use extensively for mechanisms - students look at each others' work and quite often spot their own errors...... once they have had a practise on the MWB they are often happier to come and share with the class on the main white board.
    Can also use for Kagan type starters like Round table - where each student writes an idea on the MWB and passes it on to the next person - they often don't like others writing in their books so this removes that obstacle.
    Like the diamond 9 idea - will definitely try that too.

     
  6. p1j39

    p1j39 New commenter

    My kids like to write the correct answer to a question to hold up to me whilst having a penis drawn on the other side.

    After a few days of this, I gave up. Won't use them again!
     
  7. I have used them at A level for Born-Haber review, 3d structures of molecules, and organic structural formula. They are an invaluable resources for any ability and level.
    Like the diamond idea. We also use them for the weakest link and similar quizes.
    Balancing equations with KS4 is great as it gives them a chance to get it wrong and it doesn't matter- and as s20blu wrote it doesn't matter.
     
  8. The way to get round this is to get tell them that they have to draw a diagram/graph they will need to keep refering to on one side and write their answers on the other!
    I also walk around the class so I can see the back of the boards (much shuffling from those with rude diagrams[​IMG])
    Like all bits of kit a class need to be trained how to use them correctly.
    An ideal way is to get them started is to ask them to write true/false on either side and then bombard them with quiz questions!
    Don't give up - they are brilliant to use for plenaries.
     
  9. It could have been worse. They could have traced one.
     
  10. Ha ha ha @ comment above!
    With lower school, describing a diagram/ thing that's new to them and get them to draw it, then choosing most accurate interpretation goes down well.
    Eg. it's a long thin cell, so draw a line with a six sided shape on the left side and a fork like a snake's tongue on the right side. Add a solid circle into the hexagon and draw lines coming from the outside of the hexagon at all angles. Draw lines coming from the other end too. Add a string of sausages along the length of the long line that you drew to begin with... (motor neurone). It sounds silly, but they love it, really concentrate and get quite competitive.
    Also, upper school like team quizzes. Hold up answers on whiteboard, they get very competitive too. Any shouting out= penalty marks. Quick, quiet, good for assessing general level of understanding.
    How's this diamond thing work?
     
  11. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    IMO waste of time. Time wasted giving them out, collecting them in, counting all pens and erasers and yes, they do draw rude diagrams and write out swear words, confident they can rub them out quickly.
    Kids should not be afraid of making mistakes!
     
  12. I've always found them a pain to be honest - yes I can see the many benefits, but as pointed out they come with a load of problems: handing out the boards, pens and erasers, invariably finding that half the pens don't work so faffing with swapping them out, finding that some of the boards have been written on with permanent marker, dealing with the rude drawings, collecting them back in etc. etc. etc...

    It's such a shame, but I've more or less given up on them now.
     
  13. Unfortunately I'm the same. I love the idea but the cost of replacing pens was getting too much. Now I collect paper out of recycling bins and have a pile of that sitting in the middle of each bench. That is what they use for rough work or group discussions and I feel I am still doing my bit for the environment.
     
  14. At the start of my lesson I assign one student to be the Class leader. They are in charge of doing some minor things including delegating someone to do pens, someone the boards, choose people to answer the homework questions and check on other students during the lesson. It works for my classes as this one student has a bit of power for that day.
    They like to mimic the teacher and tell off the others a little.
    It is also a good way to get students involved and have a different element every lesson. Especially the quite student or the noisy one.

    I give commands to student to reduce the amount of time-wasting.
    CLEAN your boards
    PASS them to the Right hand side
    John will COLLECT the boards
    Susan will COLLECT the pens
    WRITE down your homework
    SHOW me the writing
    SIT in your groups...

    A steady routine of commands helps increase conformity and simplify directions.

    Just like NIKE, Just DO it.
     
  15. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    We have a box in every lab, unfortunatly we can't afford to buy the pens so they haven't seen the light of day for about 5 years!
     
  16. I am fortunate enough to have a set of show-me markerboardsand recently I bought myself a set of show-me chalkboards, so much less mucking about with pens and cleaning!
    Bring back the chalkboard I say! [​IMG]
     
  17. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    When you say bought yourself I hope you mean out of the departmental budget?
     
  18. [​IMG]
    Sadly no, both markerboard and chalkboard show-me boards came from my own money, as did the backing paper on my classroom walls etc...


     
  19. They are excellent to prove to an observer most kids have achieved. Other than that, nah they don't work very well
     
  20. sheepie55

    sheepie55 New commenter

    I use them for competitions. I put a question on the board (i.e. which element has 4 neutrons) and the first one to hold up the correct answer on their board gets a sweet.
     

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