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The Shoe Project- primary

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by CaptainTuttle, Jun 24, 2011.

  1. CaptainTuttle

    CaptainTuttle New commenter

    Has anyone else been asked to introduce the 'shoe project' to their school?

    It involves buying every child in the school a pair of white canvas pump in the average size for a year 6 pupil (roughly 300 children in my school) and using them to show a journey as they progress through the school. Each year the classes produce work relating to shoes (can be cross curricular eg geography/history/art) but focusing on the role/symbolism in faith and community groups- these are stored in the shoebox or decoration can be added to the pumps to represent the area studied to be revisited at the end of year 6.

    I'm desperately seeking enthusiasm for this project as I'm not sure it can work! Firstly, we have no money, how can we justify buying so many shoes? Second, where are they going to be stored? 30 shoe boxes per class take a lot of space. Third, how can I motivate the other teachers to actually take part in the project when it sounds so impractical?
    Please help!
     
  2. The idea of life as a journey and collecting things in boxes as children progress through school makes a lot of sense - it's a special school idea, really, I remember Flo Longhorn talking about it. However, buying white canvas shoes seems to be a very literal interpretation of the idea. What can you do with them? There isn't much space to decorate them and once you've made a mess of them, that's it. And you are stuck with it as you move through the school. Are you sure this isn't sponsored by Clarks?
     
  3. san38

    san38 New commenter

    Oh dear -this seems to be growing! I went on INSET the other day where I was encouraged to reflect on an emotional bond I may have with a shoe (erm...none).When I confessed my lack of involvement with my leather cladded friends I was asked 'what this said about me' (possibly that I'm sane??).
    I agree that this has some relevance within a primary or special school -the thought of my y11 boys gazing at their feet and telling me about their emotional involvement with those trainers had me in stitches. Not my cup of tea I'm afraid.
     
  4. Maybe it's a misunderstanding of the 'sole' [​IMG]

     
  5. san38

    san38 New commenter

  6. CaptainTuttle

    CaptainTuttle New commenter

    Fairly certain it's not sponsored by Clarks... maybe one of the cheaper shoe shops! The biggest problem is that the head is all for it. Been speaking to a colleague who has suggested creating it as a display for each class rather than the full project... just need to convince the boss now :D
     
  7. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    OH I know a lot about year 10/11 fixation with shoes. At least a few years ago when I was working in Birmingham in a school where a lot of the kids came from really poor homes. Shoes were a big item of peer-competition and self respect demanded that you have the best ones. I knew kids who ordered them from catalogues - at £90 or £100 a pair, just so that they could keep the street cred.


    When one of them (whose mother I knew) told them about this, I said he was a fool. His mum worked from home and earned about £1.00 an hour. I said it was like taking his mum's blood and pouring it down the drain. He said his mum would be happy to do that for him, if it meant he was happy.


    Personally, I have really wide feet so a problem in getting shoes that fit. As my own income is somewhat precarious, my sister kindly bought me some shoes for Christmas - from Clarke's sale. They were pink and the design made me feel as if I was falling over - but I figured that I would have to just get used to them. Fortunately the first day I wore them - within less than an hour my feet started to hurt. So I took them to a local Clarkes to try to exchange. (I'd been wearing them in the house and not walking anywhere so they were still pristine.)


    I went to two Clarkes shops and tried on more pairs than I can count. I only found one pair that actually fitted and was comfortable. They are a muddy green. Better than pink but not much.


    One of my students commented the first day I was at College that you can get quite nice shoes cheaply in Primark. Unfortunately they don't do a 'G' fitting.

    me and shoes, emotional bond? No. I wish I could just go barefoot. But I do think a lot of the year 11 boys would have something to say on this.


    Well that's all a complete distraction from the original idea. I think that buying the white trainers is a stupid waste of money. I always try to remember that a child dies from poverty every three seconds. If the school wants to encourage every child to fork out some money for something it should be really necessary and preferably go in some way to reduce the rich-poor gap if its not directly for their educational needs.

    But if the Head is sold on this idea of journey, why not get the kids to create a cardboard shoe and beg for a shoebox from their local shop to keep it in - if your school has the storage space - and it's not a fire hazard. You could make a template for them to draw round and then they make it as homework.

    But it sounds a bit of a distraction to me. Surely keeping a journal would be just as powerful in inspiring the students to engage with the concept of spiritual journey (which I do think is a sound idea.)


    ps - I guess that not having involvement with shoes is just that you've been lucky and not mixed with people who judge you by them - and your feet-size and income mean that shoes have never been an emotional issue. I do have a friend who is such a shoe-aholic that when she gets a pair she really likes, she will get up in the night, just to look at them and smile!!
     
  8. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    OH I know a lot about year 10/11 fixation with shoes. At least a few years ago when I was working in Birmingham in a school where a lot of the kids came from really poor homes. Shoes were a big item of peer-competition and self respect demanded that you have the best ones. I knew kids who ordered them from catalogues - at £90 or £100 a pair, just so that they could keep the street cred.


    When one of them (whose mother I knew) told them about this, I said he was a fool. His mum worked from home and earned about £1.00 an hour. I said it was like taking his mum's blood and pouring it down the drain. He said his mum would be happy to do that for him, if it meant he was happy.


    Personally, I have really wide feet so a problem in getting shoes that fit. As my own income is somewhat precarious, my sister kindly bought me some shoes for Christmas - from Clarke's sale. They were pink and the design made me feel as if I was falling over - but I figured that I would have to just get used to them. Fortunately the first day I wore them - within less than an hour my feet started to hurt. So I took them to a local Clarkes to try to exchange. (I'd been wearing them in the house and not walking anywhere so they were still pristine.)


    I went to two Clarkes shops and tried on more pairs than I can count. I only found one pair that actually fitted and was comfortable. They are a muddy green. Better than pink but not much.


    One of my students commented the first day I was at College that you can get quite nice shoes cheaply in Primark. Unfortunately they don't do a 'G' fitting.

    me and shoes, emotional bond? No. I wish I could just go barefoot. But I do think a lot of the year 11 boys would have something to say on this.


    Well that's all a complete distraction from the original idea. I think that buying the white trainers is a stupid waste of money. I always try to remember that a child dies from poverty every three seconds. If the school wants to encourage every child to fork out some money for something it should be really necessary and preferably go in some way to reduce the rich-poor gap if its not directly for their educational needs.

    But if the Head is sold on this idea of journey, why not get the kids to create a cardboard shoe and beg for a shoebox from their local shop to keep it in - if your school has the storage space - and it's not a fire hazard. You could make a template for them to draw round and then they make it as homework.

    But it sounds a bit of a distraction to me. Surely keeping a journal would be just as powerful in inspiring the students to engage with the concept of spiritual journey (which I do think is a sound idea.)


    ps - I guess that not having involvement with shoes is just that you've been lucky and not mixed with people who judge you by them - and your feet-size and income mean that shoes have never been an emotional issue. I do have a friend who is such a shoe-aholic that when she gets a pair she really likes, she will get up in the night, just to look at them and smile!!
     
  9. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter


    very good, Flame!


    I wonder if you can tell us more about the journey project and how you use the shoe-boxes in Special Education.

    I've spent an hour googling Shoe Project Primary - and mostly coming up with commercial reports such as how Nike are planning their latest campaigns!

    I have found a few references to Primary schools - notably a charity which collects good second hand shoes and sends them to third world kids - and others which use shoe boxes to fill with gifts for children at Christmas - or for Haiti survivors. I am uploading a resource of these which may be of interest but I would really like a clear brief of the 'journey' shoe project to include.

    certainly it stimulates some creative ideas and lateral thinking skills.

    Then I will get some sleep!
     

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