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The seasonal nature of tutoring

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by minceandquince, Jun 12, 2017.

  1. theluckycat

    theluckycat Occasional commenter

    When you say antisocial Mrs Mumbles (fellow animal avatar), do you mean as regards working on your own? I really enjoy tutoring from the point of view of being autonymous, not getting involved in petty politics, and being treated (generally) respectfully by tutees and parents. I do however miss the teamwork and sociability of working in a school. With the severe cutbacks going on in education at present, I am happy to be away from the coalface, but working in a classroom in a good and supportive team did use to be a beautiful thing!
     
    tsarina likes this.
  2. Steph2002

    Steph2002 New commenter

    Very interesting to read these posts.
    I,d like to start up. A level only.
    I read now down to 3 A levels, no AS exams more demand for tutors.
    I work full time still.
    Could I fit it in, if i tutored on line for a company?
    Don,t think got the tine start up a business.
     
  3. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    We could have had a nice break this year but decided on two different weeks in early September and October in the UKand overpay debts instead. I've noticed a dropping off but still a steady steam, plus a few new arrivals, people who only want summer catchups, etc. I toyed with examining but am glad I didn't. It has been ok, working a bit every day. Wouldn't say it has dried up, just hard to get a clear two week slot of time off.
     
  4. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Can't see how you could just do A level. I get very few A level kids. Lots of GCSE!
     
  5. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Hi and sorry for the disgracefully tardy reply. Yes I meant exactly what you said, the old-school style cameraderie and banterousness, being needed and respected. Now, the cat and the students need and respect me as well, but I am painfully aware that I am not using half of my brain at all. I'm supposed to be writing, but it's too close to sitting down with the students! I too am happy to be in splendid isolation away from the bitching and bullies. I've been a careers advisor, counsellor, mediator, form-filler, lots of extra roles this year when on paper I just tutor English. I no longer have to do stupid pointless things for inexperienced stupid pointless people, but I do miss the normal nice teachers who made the job a career and the school a community. I worry (briefly) that if I ever did return, there would be none of this type of teacher left. Maybe there won't be.
     
    superdupersenco and saluki like this.
  6. theluckycat

    theluckycat Occasional commenter

    yes Mrs Mumbles, agreed. Also congratulations on the fabulous marks you and your tutees have achieved. Level 9! You have turned lives around there, they will always have that on their record and cvs, superb work.
     
    superdupersenco and Mrsmumbles like this.
  7. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    I don't see the demand for tutors going down any time soon.
     
    Mrsmumbles likes this.
  8. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    .....my tutee in Year 10 last year wants to start again next week !
     
    Mrsmumbles likes this.
  9. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    @jennylambchop, aw thanks, I was so pleased. Written off by her useless academy. Guess what? They included this student's results in their ridiculous A* to A percentages, after they excluded them! This is why I can no longer trust School league tables, percentages, or OFSTED. Parents really cannot ever truly trust those results or even where they came from.
     
  10. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Just do it. Seriously. Start small, then get bigger! Doubt you can do all A level. Full time might need you gear changing to broaden your age ranges. I always coached eleven plus English whilst teaching it full time in secondary. Needed to reduce the bills! Am so glad I did now, as I wasn't scared to take on the KS2 children for coaching. It's not everyone's cup of tea, but these kids really need good Maths and English coaches as so many local schools are so awful now. It gives the bright but less affluent kids a step up. It levels the prep school playing field.(although, oddly, the eleven plus competition for the top grammars and indies is so colossal now, I'm coaching prep kids as well nowadays) GCSE is even more desperate, with overworked teachers unable to provide the help the children need. When you adapt to the ages and needs of the kids, I think you become a better teacher. The ages I focus on now really appreciate my support and I see the difference; not something I always saw in the top independent school I once worked in. They had already selected. The stress there was the sheer workload of marking and the nasty, vindictive SLT interference. Personally, I'd rather take on smaller stresses of mastering a new key stage and calming down understandably stressed kids. It's easier!
     
    superdupersenco likes this.
  11. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    I've just got a lovely student coming back for seconds! It's nice, like old times!
     
    superdupersenco likes this.
  12. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    I can only take on two students this term because of school commitments. Normally it would take a month or so into the new academic year to get sorted but I'm booked up already.
     

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