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The Scottish Education System - what's wrong with it ???

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by gnulinux, May 17, 2015.

  1. brothermunro

    brothermunro Occasional commenter

    Education in Scotland was better off when politicians had nothing to do with it.
     
    Freddie92 likes this.
  2. Bensusan

    Bensusan New commenter

    The problem is targets. The emphasis has moved from providing students with skills for their post-school life to providing head teachers a evidence for their success. How the management team is perceived by the authority is more important than how well we have catered for the students in providing them what they need. For example, pushing a high percentage of students through National 5 whether they want, need or are capable of this qualification. Setting students up to fail in this way adds unnecessary pressure onto students and teachers. The rhetoric goes along the lines of "we want to give pupils the best opportunity at the higher level qualifications" but the reality is that the bottom line is number of National 5 passes.
     
    Freddie92 and bigjimmy2 like this.
  3. GuessWho

    GuessWho Occasional commenter

    " For example, pushing a high percentage of students through National 5 whether they want, need or are capable of this qualification. Setting students up to fail in this way adds unnecessary pressure onto students and teachers. The rhetoric goes along the lines of "we want to give pupils the best opportunity at the higher level qualifications" but the reality is that the bottom line is number of National 5 passes."

    I totally agree!!!
     
    Freddie92 likes this.
  4. Freddie92

    Freddie92 Occasional commenter

    Again I agree with most points on here.

    Education isn't really measurable and quantifiable not matter what anyone says. It is not like a Factory where if you take A and put it through process B then it will come out as outcome C. There are too many variables.

    I really dislike this need for competition between teachers and departments which is still ongoing.

    I have seen both sides of the coin. Of course we all give ourselves big pats on the back when our classes have 100% pass rates and the pupils get a host of As. But we all have been in that boat when we have classes where pupils for one reason or another do not achieve or quite simply they just don't have it... and no matter what you try parental pressures ensure the pupil sits the final exam...

    If they really want excellence in education what they need is smaller class sizes and more qualified teachers.

    I'd also argue that for teachers to consistently deliver high quality lessons then they actually need more prep time. Because every lesson we teach we could always tweak it and improve on it. But this takes time to develop or edit resources.

    So rather than teaching for 27 or so periods and having only 6 non-contacts, the number should probably be around 21 or 22 for actual teaching and 11 or 12 periods for prep, correction and development.

    But pigs will fly first.
     
  5. brothermunro

    brothermunro Occasional commenter

    Pigs flying indeed Freddie92!

    Perhaps judging schools based on 'positive destinations' rather than exam passes would help? Difficult to do though, would you rank how positive the destination was (and how would that be done)?
     
  6. inthered

    inthered Occasional commenter

    Interesting, not to say depressing, but if you trawl through the comments from England on this site, I think you'll find their conditions to be far worse than here. Most likely is that CS teachers get the qualification as a backup, but go to industry where the rewards are more immediately lucrative, thinking that they can dip into teaching if they need to. That was the view of the last CS student I encountered, a few years ago now though.
     
  7. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    Worst ever rating for maths, reading and science. Who would have thought it???
     
  8. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    From May 2015 ...
    "Add to the above falling levels of numeracy and literacy meaning that Secondary pupils in particular are unable to properly access the Curriculum, which is itself shrinking as subjects disappear.

    The result of this is that pupil attainment is falling - fewer exams being passed.

    It is clear that the Scottish Education System is being slowly degraded. But who is being held to account for this???"

    Everybody saw this coming a long time ago, but the SNP Government chose to ignore the situation.
     
  9. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    Anybody like to point out some aspect of (current) Scottish Education that has actually proved to be a success?
     
  10. Marco82

    Marco82 Established commenter

    Swinney's standard response to every bit of damning news about Scottish education, like the terrible literary and numeracy figures, is to pretend that his party has nothing to do with it. He then sets up a straw man of those standing in the way of success and then knocks it down. Yesterday he said something like, "those who think we don't have to make radical changes have another think coming". But who are the people saying that? Can he or,anyone else name them? The Nats like to paint themselves as a new, fresh force in politics, totally different to the lying, manipulative careerists in the other parties, but in what way are they better than anyone else?
     
  11. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

  12. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    Well, what's changed for the better in Scottish education over the last year???
     
  13. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    Err nothing evidently.
     
    markbannan likes this.
  14. bigjimmy2

    bigjimmy2 Established commenter

    Why are you answering your own posts now, gnu?

    Ah, gottit, someone at your level.
     
  15. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    Where's your thread on Russia then???
     
  16. bigjimmy2

    bigjimmy2 Established commenter

    And why would I do that?

    Ah, someone at your level . . .
     
  17. bigjimmy2

    bigjimmy2 Established commenter

    Just noticed this morning that the school I work at has a "Principal Teacher of Raising Attainment (Tracking and Monitoring)".

    The person involved has been teaching for all of five minutes . . .

    The Tracking and Monitoring bit of the job title (temporary, it's one of those silly funded posts) means he/she wrote the database that records homework and test marks for the whole school . . .

    And, of course, attainment at the school has gone doon the toilet.
     
  18. Marisha

    Marisha Occasional commenter

    Been there. Got the t-shirt.

    We had to add all our E's and O's. Then we were told to use the SALs. Then everyone (except P.E.) was told to ditch those and only use the benchmarks. (Think it was September we were told to ditch the SALs?)

    My acturially reduced pension was confirmed yesterday. Woot.
     
    bigjimmy2 likes this.
  19. Marisha

    Marisha Occasional commenter

    Supposedly, the SALs are a better fit for P.E. Nope. I don't know why, either.
     
    bigjimmy2 likes this.
  20. DaveLindsay

    DaveLindsay New commenter

    My wife (not a teacher) gave a very concise observation which has probably been made many times before but ..I thought it was good..re cfe..
    What was formerly the hidden curriculum is now the curriculum.

    Things were not perfect but secondary education was improving incrementally until the thing went belly up.

    So we have lost the richness that was once there...hence the dissatisfaction and unease in the oldies amongst us....imo!
     

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