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the QTS skills tests......why so hard ?

Discussion in 'NQTs and new teachers' started by philpatjj, Jun 23, 2009.

  1. In my defence of taking 13 attempts to do an "easy Maths test"
    I worked DAMN HARD to pass my GCSE Maths to get on the PGCE course! And I worked damn hard to pass the QTS tests!
     
  2. highway61

    highway61 New commenter

    If you PASSED your GCSEs twenty years ago then you'd cope with skills tests easily, because GCSEs were way harder then. And twenty-two or more years ago you'd have had O-levels. 'Nuff said.
     
  3. highway61

    highway61 New commenter

    Congratulations on working hard. Not really relevant though, is it?
    What subject do you teach?
     
  4. In my defence of taking 13 attempts to do an "easy Maths test"
    I worked DAMN HARD to pass my GCSE Maths to get on the PGCE course! And I worked damn hard to pass the QTS tests!
    Having discovered I am Discalculate I think I have achieved a lot. How difficult is it for adults to go back to education to get a career change? I put off doing my PGCE for 10 years because I had an E in Maths GCSE and could not bere going to night school.So I worked hard and got a B in my GCSE Maths 2 years ago.How dare you say how worried you are that I might be teaching your children because it took 13 attempts and that I am in the wrong profession. At least I wanted to make a change to my life, that kind of determination is what children need to see, How many people who criticised the amount of times I took the Numeracy test have actually taken it under test conditions? How many other NQT's out there failed because of 1 single point? How many NQT's felt the frustration and desperation by failing by 1 single point and having to wait another week or two to take again as well as the pressure and stress of doing essays etc? I passed in my practice tests, the actual test is timed, and that is where the pressure comes into the test.So those who think it odd after 13 attempts, I knew someone who took 16 attempts.
     
  5. Art teacher
     
  6. I agree that if I did GCSE 20 years ago it would be easy
    I did it in 2007

     
  7. "If you PASSED your GCSEs twenty years ago then you'd cope with skills tests easily, because GCSEs were way harder then. And twenty-two or more years ago you'd have had O-levels. 'Nuff said. "

    I did mine 20 years ago this summer. Problem is I have forgotten most of it. So actually, it does require rather a lot of re-learning as opposed to a bit of revision. Its easier to learn this time round but that probably comes from maturity rather than the content becoming easier.
     
  8. I totally agree, its re-learning everything instead of revising.And its maturity rather than getting easier.

     
  9. Ok this is what i thought in my SCITT year: – the media say the GCSE are easy and not worth the paper blah blah blah – the QCA say “oh no, they are a very robust qualifications” and the TDA tell us that the GCSE curriculum is core to a strong education but the same TDA will not truly except GCSE Eng, Maths, ICT as a measure of ability in it’s own professionals, so they design the QTS Skills tests then the Teaching Profession as an whole QCA, TDA, DfSC and schools slat the universities and employers for introducing their own tests and disregarding the GCSE results. Oh the hypocrisy hurts so much!!
     
  10. mysterycat

    mysterycat New commenter

    I can't think what it is that you have to relearrn. The tests are very basic; I mean you are not exactly being asked to do calculus or anything. Being numerate is a lifeskill after all.
    There is a real difference in level of difficulty between O-Level and GCSE with O-Level being harder with more contect than the average GCSE. You only have to look at how many of the better schools are starting to abandon the standard GCSE in favour of iGCSE and IB to realise that there is something in this view. ANyway that isn't really part of this topic so I shall get off my hobby horse now.
     
  11. My point about taking the test 13 times, is not just about the lack of maths skills. It is more the lack of self awareness - you obviously didn't realise that you hadn't improved.

    I would also have thought anyone with a diagnosed disability like dyscalculia would have had special conditions, like more time in the timed bit of the test.

    I don't know if O Level was harder than GCSE - I don't think there is any fair way to judge. But I do think the growth of modular courses, where pupils can retake exams to get a higher grade - is making it far easier.
     
  12. ANYONE?
     
  13. Yes, we did audits in maths (probably ten over the course of the year of PGCE), English (four or five) and science (twelve). If we got lower than 70% in any of them, we were expected to do the necessary reading and re-take until we got a high enough mark.
     
  14. We had to do a basic Literacy and Numeracy 'exam' on our interview day at uni.
    If people failed they didn't get on the course.
     
  15. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I'm more than a little concerned that people who find these tests so difficult are seeking to become teachers of English amd maths in primary schools.
    I wouldn't want someone who couldn't pass the appropriate exams to be allowed to become my doctor, either.
    It seems to me that some people confuse really wanting to do something with suitability for it.
     
  16. The tests are no more than KS 2 level ,basic mental maths and everyday grammer and spelling that you need to be compedent in if you are going to teach. Sure the maths is against the clock, but as a teacher you will be doing mental maths almost daily and be required to be a step ahead of the children. If you cannot pass these tests, well you probably are not up to teaching the children of the country- as these are the basics of the basic.[​IMG]
     
  17. mysterycat

    mysterycat New commenter

    Hi giggle fairy,

    I have never heard of anyone doing an audit in this way but I think it is a good idea. I did a PGCE and we had to do a subject knowledge audit as we went along with lots of peer group teaching and some (but not enough) A-Level sessions.
    Teachers do vary in their knowledge but most of the ones I have come across are adequately numerate and literate. You have to be otherwise how would you interract with other staff members and parents for example?
     
  18. Mr_G_ICT

    Mr_G_ICT New commenter

    I had to practice the format of the tests a few time, but didn't find them particularly taxing. As an IT specialist however i foudn the IT test particularly frustrating as i couldnt use hotkeys and nothing was where i expected it to be. there was only ever 1 solution to any given problem.
     
  19. If you cannot pass these tests, well you probably are not up to teaching the children of the country- as these are the basics of the basic.[​IMG]

    Probably true Greg;
    grammar
    competent
    'Let he who is without sin cast the first stone'
     
  20. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Whether or not yapyap (or anyone else of like mind) can spell or type, the issue remains that 13 attempts to pass a basic skills test suggests a person is not a fit person to teach, especially if the teaching includes that particular basic skill.
    That's why the tests are there. As I said earlier, I wouldn't want a doctor who couldn't pass the requisite tests, either.
     

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