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The new story: MFL as Cinderella in National Curriculum

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by sorina _sunshine, Apr 8, 2013.


  1. <font size="2">I have started to
    wonder about the multitalented ministry of Education which creates a strategy
    every three-four years .Diplomas? Baccalaureate? What&rsquo;s next?</font>


    How many millions
    have been spent on elaborating, preparing and buying these programmes? How many
    consultants have been paid to create them?


    The modern
    language teachers saluted the last government&rsquo;s
    decision to promote languages as compulsory part of the Ebacc &hellip;we were all preparing
    for a debacle of enthusiasts who were supposed to start flooding our classes
    with linguistic appetite and great
    enthusiasm for global citizenship&hellip;


    Finally Cinderella&rsquo;s
    time with small and unrecognised importance was about to be abolished.


    She was no longer
    the optional subject with no practical relevance of the curriculum. Her sisters:
    Maths, English, IT, Citizenship, Science and a part of the Humanities couldn&rsquo;t
    laugh of her anymore.


    Everybody
    attacked the proposal of a new qualification so when the midnight came, Cinderella
    was turned back into a beggar, a poor lady with no importance or reputation&hellip;.


    Today, the main
    talk is about employability skills&hellip;..surely knowing couple of foreign languages
    must be an asset on each CV. We talk about citizenship in a multicultural
    society however we dismiss the importance of speaking at least a foreign
    language&hellip;.


    As secondary and
    FE MFL teachers what are we supposed to do? Wait for the future generations to
    be taught languages in primary schools? What if Mr Gove has a change of heart
    about this also?

    <font size="2">Then&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;what next?</font>

    <font size="2"> </font>

     

  2. <font size="2">I have started to
    wonder about the multitalented ministry of Education which creates a strategy
    every three-four years .Diplomas? Baccalaureate? What&rsquo;s next?</font>


    How many millions
    have been spent on elaborating, preparing and buying these programmes? How many
    consultants have been paid to create them?


    The modern
    language teachers saluted the last government&rsquo;s
    decision to promote languages as compulsory part of the Ebacc &hellip;we were all preparing
    for a debacle of enthusiasts who were supposed to start flooding our classes
    with linguistic appetite and great
    enthusiasm for global citizenship&hellip;


    Finally Cinderella&rsquo;s
    time with small and unrecognised importance was about to be abolished.


    She was no longer
    the optional subject with no practical relevance of the curriculum. Her sisters:
    Maths, English, IT, Citizenship, Science and a part of the Humanities couldn&rsquo;t
    laugh of her anymore.


    Everybody
    attacked the proposal of a new qualification so when the midnight came, Cinderella
    was turned back into a beggar, a poor lady with no importance or reputation&hellip;.


    Today, the main
    talk is about employability skills&hellip;..surely knowing couple of foreign languages
    must be an asset on each CV. We talk about citizenship in a multicultural
    society however we dismiss the importance of speaking at least a foreign
    language&hellip;.


    As secondary and
    FE MFL teachers what are we supposed to do? Wait for the future generations to
    be taught languages in primary schools? What if Mr Gove has a change of heart
    about this also?

    <font size="2">Then&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;what next?</font>

    <font size="2"> </font>

     
  3. spsmith45

    spsmith45 New commenter

    Hi sorina_sunshine! First post. Welcome!
    Actually it was not the last government's idea, it was Michael Gove's. The Labour government did have MFL as compulsory at KS4 until 2004, although in reality many children did not enter for GCSE.
    I'm not sure I would call MFL a Cinderella subject, unless you call every subject except maths, science and English a Cinderella subject. Art and music teachers may have a stronger case.
    I'm sure it is true that governments are always pulled between raising the status of languages and the reality that many children, being English speakers, are not interested.
    Perhaps MFL is an ugly sister: it gets to go to the ball, but no-one likes it.
    I suppose MFL is on a par with history and geography in terms of status, given it is compulsory at KS2, compulsory at KS3, optional at KS4, but part of the Ebacc, and a so-called facilitating subject for Russell Group universities.
     
  4. I don't think I'd want to be Cinderella, if I was to be kissed by Prince Charming played by Gove.[​IMG]
     

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