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The light has come on!

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Goldopals, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. Goldopals

    Goldopals New commenter

    Something happened in Maths today that was very special (at least to me). One of my year 10s has been struggling with multiplying surds and I was helping her friend with a question. All of a sudden, this girl tilted her head to the side and had a funny expression on her face. You could see in her mannerisms that something had 'clicked'!
    I thought it was amazing that I got to see the moment when a struggling student just 'got it' and got excited about it!
     
  2. Goldopals

    Goldopals New commenter

    Something happened in Maths today that was very special (at least to me). One of my year 10s has been struggling with multiplying surds and I was helping her friend with a question. All of a sudden, this girl tilted her head to the side and had a funny expression on her face. You could see in her mannerisms that something had 'clicked'!
    I thought it was amazing that I got to see the moment when a struggling student just 'got it' and got excited about it!
     
  3. Well done! I remember a similar moment in Music, when I was doing intervals. It was a hot day, and the kids wanted to sit outside in the shade, so I took my accordion, and gave them a physical demonstration.... One kid gave me a similar look, and proclaimed loudly "Ah! NOW i get it!" ... his marks went on to improve amazingly after that, as he believed he just couldn't understand, and it built his self-confidence enough to try and accept other new concepts. Congratulations! [​IMG]
     
  4. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    I love it when that happens. Well done!
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Goldopals

    Goldopals New commenter

    Thanks :) It is the first time that that has happened so it was rather exciting!
     
  6. EcoLady

    EcoLady New commenter

    It is indeed a magical moment. Their entire face and posture changes as the penny drops :)
     
  7. angiebabe

    angiebabe New commenter

    I'm sorry but I don't understand 'multiplying surds'?
     
  8. chocolateworshipper

    chocolateworshipper Occasional commenter

    Surds are numbers left in 'square root form' (or 'cube root form' etc). They are therefore irrational numbers. The reason we leave them as surds is because in decimal form they would go on forever and so this is a very clumsy way of writing them.
     
  9. Good heavens! have these surds been around for long?
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    A surd is a square root of a number that is not an integer e.g. sqr root 3.
    A square root of a number times by itself must be that number. That's the definition of a square root
    Oh no, we have to do sqr root 3 x sqr rt 3 = sqr rt 9 = 3 (they need that extra step)
    And then they get it! Sometimes
    I'm still waiting for some of mine to get histograms!!
     
  11. My light has just gone out...
     
  12. Mine too.
    Maths never was my strong point.
     
  13. angiebabe

    angiebabe New commenter

    My light has faded into oblivion tooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  14. Cestrian

    Cestrian New commenter

    I <u>really</u> don't remember them from O level Maths - were they called something different? [​IMG]
     
  15. Ruthie66

    Ruthie66 New commenter

    they weren't in O Level - we did some index rules but surds weren't in it - I'm trying to get my head round them but I always have to check in the book when I have to support a student with it.
     
  16. angiebabe

    angiebabe New commenter

    Poor students is all I can say.[​IMG]
     
  17. Before today, I thought that surds were what a Geordie got when adding water to Fairy Liquid... [​IMG]
    [disclaimer - other detergents also available].
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I blame the teachers.
    OK - L.O. To understand what a surd is.
    What is the square root of 4?
    2
    What is the square root of 5?
    ummm. Gets out calculator.
    2.122323445 (I haven't checked so don't tell me)
    Well, that's a bit long to write down so we call it sqrt root 5 (that's the square root symbol btw)
    Now - let's go for a harder one.
    sqrt root of 20 is the same as the sqrt root (4 x 5)
    Which is the same as sqrt root 4 x sqr root 5
    We know sqrt 4
    Miss, miss - is it 2?
    Yes, well done, Have a reward note home. So the sqr root 4 x sqr root 5 is the same as 2 x sqrt root 5
    We leave the sqr root 5 in surd form (that means we don't work it out) so the answer to the sqr root of 20 = 2sqrt5
    What use will this be when I leave school?
    It will help you get a GCSE. Now turn to p100 and do the exercise. Meanwhile I will interrupt your work in 5 minutes because I have to return to the LO and I will do a mini plenary in 10 minutes. Followed by a peer assessment (your friend will mark it).
    Outstanding or what - have we all made exceptional progress?
     
  19. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    Tick. 10/10 and a gold star. See me after the bell goes for a snog and a share of the apple you gave me.
     

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