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'The Highwayman' KS2

Discussion in 'English' started by Christine7, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. Does anyone have any ideas for work I could do with 'The Highwayman' as a unit of work on narrative poetry with Year 5?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Does anyone have any ideas for work I could do with 'The Highwayman' as a unit of work on narrative poetry with Year 5?
    Thanks!
     
  3. Am I alone in considering this to me more suitable for KS3? I know a lot of schools teach this in Year 7; it's such a pity that so many kids' experience of literature is repetative.

     
  4. This is often/always put forward as possible poem for upper KS2 but, like Lumpy, I have always felt it sat more comfortably in early KS3. There are too many things that have been moved down to KS2 and little left to add excitement to the early years of secondary school.
     
  5. I feel it is quite scary for Year 5. Far better to wait until Year 7.
     
  6. pretend u r on a radio station and use musical instruemnts etc to tell the story
     
  7. I would agree that this is best left until Y7. I am also a bit disturbed by the number of established Y7 poems/texts being taught at primary. Yes, there's the repetition side of it, which is annoying; but what concerns me more is the suitability. I was amazed the other day to find stuff on Clickteaching for Robert Swindells' 'Abomination' aimed at YEAR 4!!
     
  8. Have you seen the unit of planning for the Highwayman on the new framework site for year 5? We've just done the first week following most of the ideas from the website and the children have produced some super work - lots of drama, reading, opinions and insights.
     
  9. I think this is an excellent text for Year 5. I have just used it with my own year 5 class and they loved it.

    There are plenty of opportunities for speaking and listening, chanting the poem through, adding sound effects with instruments. We did a lot of drama and hot seating etc. We focused on similes and metaphors. The children loved it. We made storyboards to go with the poem.

    If year 7 want to use it then fine but you can't deny KS2 teachers using a text just because you want it.

    Another great text is The Lady of Shallot for narrative poetry. We have looked at this and also The Inchcape Rock.

     
  10. "If year 7 want to use it then fine but you can't deny KS2 teachers using a text just because you want it."

    Okay, thanks for that little gem. Are we, or are we not, all on the same side?

    What I would advocate, and have done in the past on here, is talking to your colleagues in KS3 (note that word, 'colleagues') and try to avoid, for the sake of the children, doubling up on schemes of work that they will do in several years time. This isn't about the skills taught, it's about the medium used to teach those skills.

    KS3 teachers have ben teaching 'Macbeth' for years, for the tests. Very few would consider it good practice to offer the same text at KS4 and say 'oh, we're doing something different with it'. If it's taught in one phase, it should be avoided in others, and from what I can tell, The Highwayman is a very popular KS3 text.

     
  11. cornflake

    cornflake Occasional commenter

    What I would advocate then, is talking to your colleagues in KS2 lumpy, so as to try to avoid, for the sake of the children, doubling up on texts that they have already covered! :)

    (Used in Year 4 too: with more able children who loved it!)
     
  12. Re Post 12. That's why members of our department DO go into primary feeders to discuss the curriculum. excellent idea isn't it?

    Juliateacher - I guess that puts me right in my place, doesn't it? I wonder what dfes might suggest for us instead? It is interesting that they put The Highwayman into KS2 when so many experienced teachers associate it with successful lessons at KS3. Maybe this idea of cross-phase discussion should inlude dfes - that would be innovative, wouldn't it?
     
  13. cornflake

    cornflake Occasional commenter

    lumpy: I think you are missing the point. KS3 cannot dictate what KS2 do. If texts are suitable for use in KS2 you can't expect us not to use them just so you can! I'm really glad to hear that your KS3 colleagues do go into schools. Hopefully to find out what is going on, rather than to tell them what they ought to be doing. We don't just do colouring these days.
     
  14. I am sure everyone is doing a fab job (primary and secondary) but the debate here raises an interesting and important issue. To avoid doubling up and to ensure the hitting of the framework, do we now need a list of approved texts for every Key Stage that must to be covered (ducks her head under the parapet)?
     
  15. Phoebe, as much as it grieves me to say so, maybe that would be an idea. You know, I feel a bit sore that so many of the texts I've been teaching, and have enjoyed teaching, are now redundant in my stock cupboard because the kids have done them before. In many cases it represents a considerable chunk of departments' budgets as well - capitation that we can ill-afford to waste.

    I stand by what I said earlier - if local consortiums were cross-phase, it would be better for everyone. I apologise if some of my earlier responses seemed rude - I just feel very strongly that poor communication between secondaries and their feeders really lets kids down.

    And yes, for the poster who asked, I DO know that primary kids do more than colour in all day. I'm primary trained, (although that seems like a lifetime ago) and as I say, I visit feeders as part of our transition work. That's not about 'dictating' what they can teach either, but if it has to be about comprmise, then that can work both ways.
     
  16. cornflake

    cornflake Occasional commenter

    I agree lumpy, that poor communication between secondaries and their feeders really lets kids down. And I'm really pleased to hear that you do listen to what your primaries do. It wasn't the impression you gave in your posting.

    Interstingly enough, we have a Year 6/7 transition project running locally - which is planned by Year 6 and Year 7 teachers together: literacy based. Why not offer your resources to your feeder schools in the spirit of partnership if they are no longer needed?

    For what it's worth though, I don't think you have to chuck everything out and start again. I actually, I see no harm in revisiting some classic texts. What's important is that it's done well to start with, so that the kids embrace it second time round, rather than groan "oh no not this poem again, again, again!"
     
  17. cornflake

    cornflake Occasional commenter

    And please - no lists of literature for KS1 and 2! Leave us some creativity please! The Literacy Stragtegy tried hard enough to get rid of it...
     

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