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The future plan?

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by nightrider, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. Hello colleagues,
    With all the talk of DT in it's current form being chopped and a possible name change/re-direction towards engineering, I'm seriously considering dropping GCSE's in RM and PD. I teach in a 'challenging school' with figures of 5 A*-C inc Eng/Maths at around 35%. Few pupils go on to do A-Level DT subjects as we have no sixth forms locally that offer DT subjects at post-16. Many pupils go on to college courses or training courses regardless of their performance in DT subjects. Local colleges offereing practical, vocational courses are not interested in GCSE DT grades - they simply want good grades (C+) in Maths, Eng and Science to start level 3 courses.
    We have recently introduced BTEC Level 2 construction as a pilot, the pupils are really enjoying it and it offers proper links to further vocational studies at level 3. The teachers are also enjoying it - no exam pressure and practical emphasis. My plan, should DT being removed from the NC post-2014 is to move to a vocational manufacturing/engineering/construction approach using well-regarded qualifications such as BTEC First certificate at Level 2.
    Yes - I am aware of the changes to the league table requirements from 2014, but this is not about 'gaming' and 'boosting' results - this is about providing youngsters with worthy qualifications that will offer them the opportunity to progress and continue vocational studies at level 3. I'm not sure of the implications for KS3 yet - any ideas?
    What will you be offereing if DT goes? I guess schools will do one of three things -
    1. Axe DT completely and convert the workshops in other classrooms
    2. Continue teaching DT with some possible timetable/funding/group size reductions
    3. Shift the emphasis towards more vocational learning (see UTC's) in areas like engineering/construction/manufacturing
    What is your vision for the future that lies ahead - change is on the way!
     
  2. Hello colleagues,
    With all the talk of DT in it's current form being chopped and a possible name change/re-direction towards engineering, I'm seriously considering dropping GCSE's in RM and PD. I teach in a 'challenging school' with figures of 5 A*-C inc Eng/Maths at around 35%. Few pupils go on to do A-Level DT subjects as we have no sixth forms locally that offer DT subjects at post-16. Many pupils go on to college courses or training courses regardless of their performance in DT subjects. Local colleges offereing practical, vocational courses are not interested in GCSE DT grades - they simply want good grades (C+) in Maths, Eng and Science to start level 3 courses.
    We have recently introduced BTEC Level 2 construction as a pilot, the pupils are really enjoying it and it offers proper links to further vocational studies at level 3. The teachers are also enjoying it - no exam pressure and practical emphasis. My plan, should DT being removed from the NC post-2014 is to move to a vocational manufacturing/engineering/construction approach using well-regarded qualifications such as BTEC First certificate at Level 2.
    Yes - I am aware of the changes to the league table requirements from 2014, but this is not about 'gaming' and 'boosting' results - this is about providing youngsters with worthy qualifications that will offer them the opportunity to progress and continue vocational studies at level 3. I'm not sure of the implications for KS3 yet - any ideas?
    What will you be offereing if DT goes? I guess schools will do one of three things -
    1. Axe DT completely and convert the workshops in other classrooms
    2. Continue teaching DT with some possible timetable/funding/group size reductions
    3. Shift the emphasis towards more vocational learning (see UTC's) in areas like engineering/construction/manufacturing
    What is your vision for the future that lies ahead - change is on the way!
     
  3. sav5000

    sav5000 New commenter

    It does indeed feel like Design & Technology has been on the hit list of late.
    The subject is always evolving and it evolves in different schools in different ways.
    The quality of DT is also variable across schools for a number of reasons.
    The fact remains the subject is currently out of favour with those in power, Government, Many SMT?s and Some Parents.


    The difficulty is providing a solution that fits us all the very nature of DT means different skills and different points of view based on circumstances and experiences and own personal preferences. We are never going to agree a coherent way forward I fear.


    As I understand DT looks like this in many schools


    · Resistant Materials
    · Graphic Products
    · Food
    · Textiles
    · Some form of CAD and or CAD/CAM.

    Where possible it has evolved to include:

    · Product Design
    · Engineering GCSE
    · Electronics and / or Systems and Control GCSE
    · Engineering BTEC
    · Electronics BTEC

    Vocational, Usually out of school:
    · Construction / Joinery
    · Catering
    · Motor Vehicle
    · Electrics / Plumbing
    · Hair and beauty


    I can?t see all this all disappearing, completely, but I can see numbers being reduced and departments shrinking!!!!!!!


    Personally I think:


    · GCSE - Product Design route linked to A- level Product design must be offered, in many ways replacing Graphics and RM.
    · GCSE Electronics should be offered. Linked to A-level Science.
    · Engineering BTEC must be offered, linked to apprenticeships.
    · Textiles and Food or catering should be offered.


    They are all suitable for all abilities from top to bottom! Question is can we convince Parents and Students to opt for us?? When others, often in key positions are offering convincing conflicting advice at key moments!
     

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