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The differences between a coach and a teacher.....?

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by stopwatch, Jun 7, 2012.

  1. stopwatch

    stopwatch Lead commenter

    GGJ, thought you might like this one:
    Ok, there have been a few threads now which have discussed people wanting to upgrade from coach to teacher, plus the pitfalls of coaches teaching primary PE etc etc
    I thought it might be useful and interesting to try and ideantify exactly what the differences are which make it so difficult for each to do each others jobs as efficiently.
    Starter for 10 -
    Teacher - is able to to teach more areas of expertise. Has a more creative approach to learning. Is more adaptable. Has a much more multi-faceted job.
    Coach - more skills and tactics focused. Limited to a smaller number of sports. Less likely to work for nothing (like after school clubs). Doesnt take his/her work home.
    Ok, anybody else?
     
  2. Coach - £10 / hour*
    Teacher - £30 / hour*

    *Varies according to experience
     
  3. bigfatgit

    bigfatgit Occasional commenter

    I once phoned security at the gate house leading into the boarding school I worked at and asked them to tell the boys' coach to go straight to the main building when it got back from the trip that the boys were on.
    When I left school I was politely asked to return to the main building. When I asked why, I was told, "Because the boys' coach has to go to the main building!"
    So problem solved - a teacher teaches and a coach is a big rectangular thing with wheels on each corner! [​IMG]

     
  4. In my current role, way outside of the classroom I both teach and coach.
    Total novices with no experience or even basic comprehension of my sport are taught the rudimental knowledge and basic skills to perform the activity. They learn through a variety of stimuli. For example they receive verbal instructions, shown basic movement and actions and perhaps watch a more experienced performer. They might even be manipulated through some of the motions required to achieve success. During their first attempts at the activity they are usually provided with just enough information to carry out the basic skills inorder to perform the activity. In short the teaching is based on and aimed at their level of competance with an emphasis on achieving success. They are set up to succeed not fail. In general the teacher is very much concerned with a progression, introducing new skills as the student demonstrates his ability to move forward and develops confidence. A teacher will plan the sessions based upon the students level of skill and ability. A teacher understands the importance of skill transfer and may call upon skills students might have in other disciplins inorder to help the student master the current activity.
    When athletes reach a satisfactory level of performance then coaching can replace teaching In invasion games like football or hockey this can involve more complex tactics for example. On the whole coaches need to have a much more indepth knowledge and understanding of the sport and their role is to enable the athlete to perform at a more advanced level. I once taught a girlfriend to Ski, demonstating the basic techniques and so on. She very quickly learnt the basic skills and so I was able to further coach her until her level of performance far exceeded mine. Coaching involves a more 2 way dialogue. Coaches need to be able to quickly adapt to the demands of their subjects and require more advanced knowledge of technique, tactics and so on. As such they are generally highly specialised and concentrate on one area of sport. However do not confuse playing and coaching abilities. Many of the best professional football coaches were not top class players themselves.
    If one googles this question a variety of explanations can be found. The one below uses Internet blogging as an example http://projectidealism.blogspot.no/2010/03/difference-between-teaching-and.html an extract:
    Both teaching and coaching are of course helping someone learn a particular skill or sharing a certain piece of knowledge, and both of them are gifts that are given to a student. Teaching however, is primarily a one way interaction. A person that knows something shows you how to do something or tells you some piece of information that they know.

    Coaching on the other had requires a cyclical, ongoing interaction. In order to coach someone, you need to first teach them something, then observe the student, and then provide feedback again. Unless all three of these interactions are taking place, it cannot be considered coaching.

    One problem is that the many coaches are not even really able to coach and certainly can not teach. They have an indepth knowledge of the activity and can help the motivated and gifted perform but their problems start when students can not learn a skill or are failing to achieve success. Coaches may not present a session to involve a wide ability range and lack experience in other fields to enable them to inspire or motivate the less able.
    Coaches have their place when working with the more gifted but they can not replace teachers. In my experience teachers make good coaches but coaches do not always make good teachers.
    In addition to my work with novices I also coach the more advanced athlete. Here my role involves training programmes, nutrition, injury prevention, race preparation, tactics, equipment, resources, media etc etc far beyond what the novice needs to know. They need confidence that they will achieve success, not get hurt and above all have fun.
    I am an ex PE teacher and currently work as a guide with a British Sled Dog tour company. I manage GB's Long Distance Sled Dog Team based in the Mountain Region of Norway. Last year we raced in The World Championships and La Grande Odyssee in France. You may have seen Extraordinary Dogs on the TV. Episode 9 still on the web shows the team performing if anyone is interested.
     
  5. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Oh yes!
    To me it is down to differentiation and commitment to school life.
    Teacher - the expertise to coach a wide range of pupils, from low ability to gifted and talented, differentiating a session to include all pupils. Manages various after school events for pupils and is required to write reports and be the FIRST point of call for any pupil queries regarding sport. Regular assessment of pupils with concerns passed onto form teachers and maybe SENCO, and high flying pupils passed on details of local out of school opportunities.
    Coach - coaches a specific sport to a specific group of pupils, therefore no need for differentiation. eg. working with A,B team. Will write notes to submit to the teacher in charge for reports, and maybe required to help at after school events.
     
  6. I teach and coach rugby. Teaching is difficult. Especially, differentiation and teaching it from scratch.
    Coaching is easier because there is (supposed ) to be a core of basic skills covered. But I have coached a club at junior level where the stuff I was trying to get the team to do was beyond them.
    My failure was that I didn't revert back to being a teacher and break the skills down for them. I simply got them to repeat a move that they failed at every time. I was waiting for them to get it right rather than putting them right.
    'Coaching Fail' because I neglected to teach.
    Oh, I wasn't getting paid...


     
  7. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    What a load of waffle.
    Teacher has lesson planned for pupils.
    Pupils do not know what to do.
    Teacher teaches pupils what to do.
    Pupils understand and then learn how to do it by themselves.
    We sometimes forget that we are in charge and know what we are doing.
     
  8. bigfatgit

    bigfatgit Occasional commenter

    You are Alexander Sutherland Neill and I claim my $50-00 [​IMG]
    (You youngsters may want to google him!)
     
  9. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    I bet attendance is optional as well.

    I wonder what PE lessons are like at Summerhill, whether there are any there at all.
     
  10. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    My pupils want to do paintball. And also skydiving. I want to do cricket and athletics, as that is what they are required to learn, and that is the way it is.
     
  11. bigfatgit

    bigfatgit Occasional commenter

    We've just started elephant polo.
    I've found that the bigger and fatter they are the better. The same also applies to the elephants
     
  12. My students do do paintball.
     
  13. ..and we both learn from it..
     
  14. bigfatgit

    bigfatgit Occasional commenter

    I'm just praying that you didn't miss an apostrophe there ...
     
  15. Indoors or outdoors? [​IMG]
    Instead of athletics or cricket?
     
  16. stopwatch

    stopwatch Lead commenter

    Which syllabus has paintball in it?
     
  17. stopwatch

    stopwatch Lead commenter

    What do you learn from it?
     
  18. stopwatch

    stopwatch Lead commenter

    What do you do when the children want to learn something which is impractical eg BFG 's Elephant Polo?
    What do you do when there are 6 different activities which they want to learn within the group?
    What parameters do you give them when they choose the things they want to do?
    What do you see as being the problem with teaching a more traditional and directed curriculum?
     
  19. Lets take all those one at a time...
    What syllabus has paintball? Probably none on Earth, but I use it to allow students to demonstrate the outcomes of the syllabus that I am using. Students can achieve the same or similar syllabus outcomes in paintball as they can in cricket or football or any other physical activity. The difference is, when they nominate an option like paintball it generally means they are more motivated to participate.
    What happens when they make an impractical choice? What's an impractical choice? We discuss options based on seasons, cost, safety, equipment and make our choices from there. In fact, that becomes part of their learning? The planning process means we map out our activities, negotiate and compromise.
    The problem with a more traditional and directed curriculum? I find the more "traditional" teaching is, the more it suits the teacher, not the learner. If I'm not inspired, then how can I expect my students to be?
    I've got a feeling that the purpose and meaning of assessment has a lot to do with this thread, but we can leave that for another time
    How about you sell your vision of effective teaching to me? All I've seen so far is people having a crack at me for thinking differently.
     
  20. Could you explain how please.
     

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