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The Coronavirus impact thread

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by norwichred, Mar 10, 2020.

  1. norwichred

    norwichred Occasional commenter

    Schools in Kuwait now closed - academic year to be finished in the autumn.
     
  2. norwichred

    norwichred Occasional commenter

    Confirmed that if you teach you are free to travel or whatever you want and the government will guarantee your salary and employment rights.

    What that will mean in relation to private schools I don’t know but the circular does clearly state private and public schools.

    Even better - secondary back in August, primary not until 27th September.

    This academic year will conclude between September and December and then new school year run December until June.

    Now - obviously that’s great for those of us contracted here for another year - six months holiday where we’re free to do what we want with full pay and guaranteed employment conditions but how will this affect schools? What if staff have signed contracts to join other schools next academic year? What about academic year finishing in December - what about kids leaving a school at the end of say year three or year four for example? What if a school has 4 form entry in year three but 2 form entry in year four? What will happen to staffing requirements? What if public schools aren’t funded by the government and can’t afford to honour pay and conditions.....

    These really are interesting times and until I hear for sure from my school that I’m getting paid, and my wife from hers, I will still worry.
     
    towncryer likes this.
  3. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    We are living in interesting times!

    Student numbers in Chinese international schools will be known shortly as tuition fees payments will be due soon for the next academic year.

    Chinese Bilingual schools should not suffer student losses so teachers numbers will not be impacted. The more local students a school has the better as numbers will not fluctuate.

    Some international school owners might have to sell their Bentley to keep the petty cash box full.
     
    TeacherMan19 likes this.
  4. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    Hmm. An old friend of mine in the UK has told me that his school has closed - except that it has to stay open for the children of doctors and nurses. So while having to get ready his online teaching, he also has to go into school as well. And his school has, in effect, cancelled the Easter holidays. Maybe teaching in China would be a lot better! My friends in Shenzhen say that life is slowly returning to normal.
     
    TeacherMan19 likes this.
  5. djphillips1408

    djphillips1408 New commenter

    Not all staff are required to return to school next term to supervise the school population of children of key workers or vulnerable kids who are entitled to go to school. It will be a rota and at most you will be in once a week.
    Also the content of online learning will not be the same pressure in UK State Schools as in the international school fee paying system. Teachers in the UK won't be asked to video conference all their lessons via zoom, the unions are already jumping in under the banner of safeguarding issues to dissuade this anyway. Most teachers will just upload worksheets and rip YouTube videos then gets kids to submit work to mark. They won't have be the dancing monkeys that the parents who pay the international fees demand their kids teachers to be. Easter has certainly not been cancelled, schools will use this remaining week to plot their strategic direction.
     
    Alice K, hallsa1 and 1FineDay like this.
  6. 1FineDay

    1FineDay New commenter

    We believe China will be caught out by a second wave of the Corona virus. They sure can lock down effectively, but economic pressures encouraging a return to normality may be the guard drop that Corona is waiting for.

    I'd rather be at home with my family rather than stuck across the globe during this crisis. It's a global problem ,remember.
     
    Alice K likes this.
  7. TinyTeacher92

    TinyTeacher92 New commenter

    Kuwait has just declared a curfew with severe consequences for breaking it. The curfew is from 5pm until 4am.
     
  8. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    Well, actually my friend in the UK has been told to use something called Seesaw. It is quite similar to Zoom.
     
  9. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    Some Chinese provinces have issued orders that Universities and High Schools may open in April.

    Anyone entering the country is medically tested and has to undergo 14 days quarantine. China closed its boarders quickly with infected countries.

    Shanghai has not had a single case of C19 in over a week and it has a population of over 25million people.

    All schools in China have a several medical staff who monitor the health of pupils daily. They will be instructed to check students temperatures several times a day and before they enter schools. Every student has to show evidence of vaccinations such as MMR before they can join a school.

    Definitely China will not be caught out by a second wave of infections. You have to see the massive civil effort undermining the successful fight against the virus. Many lessons to be learnt from this pandemic but one of them is closing your boarders as air travel has spread this virus around the world. No one forced the UK to continue the free flow of flights from infected countries with no screening at airports or quarantine facilities.

    At this moment in time I would rather be in China. Prevention is better than cure!
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
    TeacherMan19 likes this.
  10. StrangePanda

    StrangePanda Occasional commenter

    HK had a return date of April 20th. Carrie Lam has now announced that this will not be an option and that schools are to remain closed 'indefinitely'.

    A good call but a bleak prospect.
     
  11. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    Copied from English Language ish News Paper.

    With more than 200,000 infections across the globe, Beijing, as a hotspot for international communications and the political center of China, is threatened by the spike of COVID-19 cases from overseas, leading the municipal government to further tighten management measures for overseas personnel entering Beijing starting from Thursday.


    Imported cases have become the main challenge of epidemic prevention and control work in Beijing, which has 34 percent of the nation's imported cases - the highest of all, Pang Xinghuo from the Beijing Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) said at Thursday's press conference.

    On Wednesday alone, Beijing reported 21 imported cases, roughly one-third of all 64 imported infections so far in the city.

    To curb imported cases in Beijing is a critical task because if the epidemic resurrects in the capital, it would exert a direct impact on international exchanges and political meetings such as the "two sessions," the annual meetings of China's top legislative body and top political consultative body, analysts said.

    The Beijing municipal government announced that starting Thursday, all people entering Beijing from overseas are to be transferred to designated quarantine venues for 14 days. They must pay the bills themselves.

    People who live alone are not allowed to take home quarantine except some special cases such as minors, the elderly, and people with underlying conditions. The Beijing government said it won't accept such applications for home quarantine from Thursday.

    Those overseas returnees who enter Beijing from other Chinese cities should report to the local communities or their employers in advance and the Beijing quarantine measures will also apply to them upon arrival.

    The new announcement on Thursday has closed a loophole in the previous policy as some people did not observe home quarantine and communities' management.

    A Chinese-Australian woman was told to leave the country for flouting quarantine rules and the Beijing Public Security Bureau decided to cancel the woman's working residence permit. The woman was found jogging in her community a day after she reached Beijing on March 14 without wearing a mask. The deportation decision instantly won sweeping applause among Chinese netizens.

    Chinese government is taking resolute measures against those failing to follow the quarantine rules or concealing their health status, in a bid to curb the inflow of imported cases, especially in the capital Beijing, Zhi Zhenfeng, a legal expert at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing, told the Global Times.

    As the first gateway safeguarding the capital, the Beijing Capital International Airport is facing mounting pressure from growing numbers of inbound passengers. Since February 29, 2,417 people with suspicious symptoms have been transferred to medical institutions after being screened by the airport customs, 127 per day on average. The number peaked on Wednesday with 479 people, according to the Beijing CDC on Thursday.

    Some overseas flights with Beijing as their destination will be diverted to other Chinese cities surrounding Beijing, including Tianjin, Hohhot and Taiyuan, according to an aviation regulator's internal document obtained by the Global Times. Authorities released some of the new arrangement starting from Friday, which may reduce the capital's pressure as most of the 64 imported cases transited in Beijing to other Chinese cities.

    Given Beijing's special status in China and the world, the government will take every effort to control the source of infection to the greatest extent and cut off the transmission channel from abroad, said Zhuang Deshui, deputy director of the Research Center for Government Integrity-Building at Peking University.

    Academic training and international meetings in Beijing usually come after the Spring Festival. "The already postponed 'two sessions' could face further delay if the epidemic situation in Beijing cannot be controlled in a timely manner," Zhuang noted.

    Imported cases usually have stronger infectivity as they are the first-generation cases in many overseas countries. Many infected patients have no symptoms but are still contagious, Zhong Nanshan, the top Chinese respiratory scientist, had warned on Wednesday, suggesting to directly use nucleic acid testing method on those people.

    In order to precisely manage those arriving in Beijing from outside the Chinese mainland, the Beijing Capital International Airport itself has also adopted a series of "closed-loop" measures that have passengers screened in designated channels and dispatch them on designated buses to designated quarantine places.

    Wendy Yang, a Beijing resident who returned to the capital from Spain on March 15 due to the expanding epidemic in Europe, told the Global Times that incoming passengers need to file a health declaration before they are allowed to enter the quarantine route where they would have their body temperatures checked.

    Yang was later taken to China International Exhibition Center, less than 6 kilometers away from the airport, by a government bus for registration and were re-examined there. Those who were found to be normal at the exhibition center will be escorted by their own city government personnel to airports or train stations to continue their journeys, or sent to a designated hotel in Beijing for a 14-day quarantine.

    People having infection symptoms will be transferred to Beijing Ditan Hospital for a nucleic acid test. Ditan hospital has screened at least 1,600 passengers in the 18 days up to Tuesday morning, reports said.

    In preparation for a growing number of imported cases in the capital, Beijing Xiaotangshan Hospital, which was at the center of SARS treatment in 2003, reopened on March 16 after a lapse of 17 years.


    Starting from March 21st, all travelers arriving in Guangdong, irrespective of their nationalities, who have been to foreign countries or regions within 14 days prior to the arrival in Guangdong, must undergo a 14-day quarantine at home or in designated venues.


    Furthermore, travelers under quarantine in Guangdong shall pay for their own board and lodging during the period.
     
  12. 1FineDay

    1FineDay New commenter

    I hope you're right old chum. China has been impressive, although the authoritarian stance must be unsettling at times (threat of deportation, arrest, etc), it is clearly the way to shorten the impact of this virus. You will have to remain closed to the rest of the world surely until the pandemic subsides, which may be when a vaccine is approved - 12 months from now (if we're lucky).

    This testing and tracing and containment will have to continue aggressively for 12 months otherwise the virus may re-establish due to spread from carriers with no/mild symptoms. It is easy to spot a person with a high fever, or a cough, but what about all those who are not showing symptoms yet transmitting the virus? This is why we fear a second wave, but hopefully we are mistaken.
     
    Alice K likes this.
  13. nikki2482

    nikki2482 New commenter

    Not true. I'm teaching in the UK and tomorrow we are all required to go in. We have about 70 children on the key worker list! No home working for us AND we have to provide wraparound care so we are working 8-6. Easter holidays HAVE been cancelled for us. We have been told our holiday will be made up at another point.
     
    didi1866 likes this.
  14. miketribe

    miketribe Established commenter

    The Spanish government has just decreed we'll be closed and under house arrest until at least April 13th, and no one seems terrribly confident that that will be the end of it. I'm beginning to fall seriously behind with my IB classes. Maybe we should start trying to get the IBO to consider pushing NEXT year's exams back to June since it seems to take them at least a year to decide anything at all!
     
  15. norwichred

    norwichred Occasional commenter

    So here in Kuwait the curfew starts tonight. The invasions sirens will be sounding which are apparently quite upsetting and then only the national guard and the police should be on the street.

    If nothing else this is a unique experience. We’ll certainly remember it.
     
    suem75 likes this.
  16. TeacherMan19

    TeacherMan19 Occasional commenter

    I'm not sure if it's just me, but I don't have a fear of deportation etc. I always think the harshness of those action are not reflected in the day to day living here. Chinese people are very kind, funny and forgiving.. . In most scenarios I have encountered. I have broken countless rules with security around and we normally laugh it off. Breaking various quarantine rules however would be very different I'm sure. But sometimes I don't wear a mask and it's fine so it depends who you come across to some degree also.

    But I'm also not worried about cctv or being monitored in any situation (in any country, because I'm not doing anything wrong. Check my Internet history... It won't be very interesting!
     
  17. norwichred

    norwichred Occasional commenter

    I must say it is lovely when you work for a decent school.

    There is so much up in the air with Kuwait at the moment. What is the next year going to look like, how are school roles going to be managed, numbers, positions. The heads and owners must be driven mad trying to work it out.

    But before all that, before anything else is looked at, the owner had a meeting with the principal last night and this morning we all get the message that.......our salaries are guaranteed for the rest of the year including the summer...........

    It's lovely when at such a difficult time, with lots of difficult situations to solve and school fees not guaranteed, the first thing the owner does is to reassure us over that.

    Those of you who know where I am, and remember the school's reputation, if this is not a clear indication that so much has changed for the better here, then I don't know what is......
     
    BlueHues likes this.
  18. Jamie2323

    Jamie2323 New commenter

    Which school is that?
     
  19. djphillips1408

    djphillips1408 New commenter

    You will be given a rota, my wife is in her school all morning with all her colleagues, she has already seen the staff rota. You won't do every day
     
    Alice K likes this.
  20. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    A rota? Wouldn't it be better if only a few teachers went into school, rather than all of them? My friend in the UK has found out that he can teach from home and he does not have to go into school. His mother is in her 80s, so he wants to reduce the risk of her getting this dreadful virus.

    Here in Bulgaria, there are Police checkpoints on all major roads, as the government wants to stop people from travelling from one city to another. The bad news is that lots of doctors and nurses have resigned in two of the main hospitals in Sofia, as they say that they have not been given adequate protective clothing.
     

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