1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

The cooking calandar

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by modelmaker, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    I came across a packet of batter mix my sweetheart had purchased and asked *** she'd bought it for. It turns out that pancake day is due. I didn't persue the question why as we have already have the knowledge and ingredients. It would surely end in tears.
    Now I always remembered when pancake day came around, because we always celebrated it on my mother's birthday, 12th February or on the nearest Tuesday. Shrove Tuesday is a week later this year. aparently, so you ain't allowed to fry them before the 21st February.
    It creates an interesting issue for me. The only days of the year I bother with a cookery calandar are those my mother adhered to which were essentially to have a roast on Sundays, Turkey at Christmas and pancakes on pancake day. There were also larger joints on bank holidays to see us over with cold meat and bubble and squeek or salads, depending on the time of year.
    So in modelmaker mansions, devoid of any religious belief, it looks like we'll be celebrating my late mother's birthday with pancakes this Sunday. I'd be most grateful if anyone has a delightful recipe for a sauce I might not have tried.
    But we live in different times to those my mother fed her family now.Our annual ritual of blackberry picking on the common can't be done these days. I went back to my stamping ground a couple of years ago and found it all gone and been replaced with bricks and mortar.
    Far be it from me to deprive some of a home so I'd be forever able to return to my own home roots to pick blackberries.
    So that's my limited cookery calendar. I expext other poster have more to contribute about their own cookery years, and I'd love to learn what I've missed.
     
  2. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    I came across a packet of batter mix my sweetheart had purchased and asked *** she'd bought it for. It turns out that pancake day is due. I didn't persue the question why as we have already have the knowledge and ingredients. It would surely end in tears.
    Now I always remembered when pancake day came around, because we always celebrated it on my mother's birthday, 12th February or on the nearest Tuesday. Shrove Tuesday is a week later this year. aparently, so you ain't allowed to fry them before the 21st February.
    It creates an interesting issue for me. The only days of the year I bother with a cookery calandar are those my mother adhered to which were essentially to have a roast on Sundays, Turkey at Christmas and pancakes on pancake day. There were also larger joints on bank holidays to see us over with cold meat and bubble and squeek or salads, depending on the time of year.
    So in modelmaker mansions, devoid of any religious belief, it looks like we'll be celebrating my late mother's birthday with pancakes this Sunday. I'd be most grateful if anyone has a delightful recipe for a sauce I might not have tried.
    But we live in different times to those my mother fed her family now.Our annual ritual of blackberry picking on the common can't be done these days. I went back to my stamping ground a couple of years ago and found it all gone and been replaced with bricks and mortar.
    Far be it from me to deprive some of a home so I'd be forever able to return to my own home roots to pick blackberries.
    So that's my limited cookery calendar. I expext other poster have more to contribute about their own cookery years, and I'd love to learn what I've missed.
     
  3. wiemaranerlover

    wiemaranerlover New commenter

    Mine are:
    Shrove Tuesday
    Lent where I give up chocolate, pudding and cake
    Stir up Sunday
    Fish and chips on Good Friday, (and fish / no meat Fridays when I remember!)
    And Chocolate on Valentine's Day - delivered by Norfolk's Jack Valentine along with a wee present.
     
  4. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter


    When I was at school we had no choice over school meals - not even 'eat-it-or-leave-it', there were fearsome dinner ladies who made sure you ate it! SOme of the schools had a limited meal cycle of one week and you knew what day of the week it was by the scents wafting over from the kitchen....Monday was curry (well what the school called curry anyway!) through to Friday which was fish.
    At home, Sunday was the big 'meat' day. Mum would cook a chicken which lasted us most of the week....it had to! Roast dinner on a Sunday and then a variety of meals to use up the chicken - every scrap - over the week...curry, chicken rice, leftovers reheated with an egg beaten through.....If times were hard finacially then the last few meals ofthe week would be meat free - or be based around a tin of meat. In more prosperous times there would have been money for a few sausages or some mince midweek....Saturday was a big deal for us, we got our pocket money and went to the shops to spend it. We only had this one day a week to buy sweets and were experts in buying something that would last a few days.
    We certainly understood the yearly seasons back when i was young. Moreso than most youngsters do today. Opa had his garden/allotment and Omi would always bottle in season to keep stores up for the times when fresh fruit and veg was unavailable. ....I have fond memories of 'jamming' season. Going out and picking blackberries (which somehow seemed to grow so much bigger when I was young than they do today!) which Mum would turn into jar upon jar of jam and jelly for the coming year. ...In season we also collected other wild berries...and chestnuts...and we'd be taken on herb foraging ventures too. Some herbs Mum used for medicines, others were for food - I still enjoy nettles cooked as spinnach....The foraging was useful/vital in ekeing out the meagre housekeeping.
    We always had pancakes on Pancake Day.
    Easter was a time for painting hard-boiled eggs which would be hidden for us to find on Easter Day. We would each be given one chocolate egg. For the egg-painting we would be permitted to invite one friend to spend the day (Good Friday) when we would have Tuna Rice (As it sounds - boiled white rice with tinned tuna in it....birthdad got tinned salmon, a whole(small!) tin for himself) and one hot-cruss bun each and paint the eggs. If possible Mum would bake a cake too.
    Valentines day went by unnoticed - birthdad never to my knowledge bought Mum a card - and at school I was never lucky enough to find an anonymous card or choccies in my desk/locker.
    Halloween wasn't big either. The begging/blackmail/threats that is Trick-or-Treat wasn't really done much. But i loved october for the pumpkins and swedes and turnips that graced our tables.
    Advent and Christmas were really big events for us. Mum made all sorts of sweets and biscuits and Christmas goodies....and still does to a lesser extent! And somehow we would find the money for two pieces of meat...chicken and pork on the dinner table. (One piece of each beth...this has to last!)

     
  5. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Hot-cross buns, as a child, they were only ever baked on Good Friday and eaten hot for breakfast.
    Sunday was always a roast, cold on Monday, fish usually on a Friday. In fact when I lived with my Grandmother in Oxford, it was a treat as it would be fish shop fish and chips. She had been brought up a Catholic. Roast chicken when one of her hens was past laying, I used to love collecting the eggs each morning.
    However Mother had her own version of curry which was leftover stew with added curry powder and raisins, I hated it!!
    Pancakes on Shrove Tuesday, definitely, Turkey at Christmas, Steak for birthdays, unfailingly.
    Jam making and chutney making eachAutumn.
    That's about all I can remember!
     
  6. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    I love pancakes for Sunday breakfast. My grandchildren always ask me to make them. They are too good to save for once a year.
     
  7. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter


    Pancakes are most assuredly not only for Shrove Tuesday!

    We ate then often when I was a child - as the main meal towards the end of a 'lean' week. No meat left, no money to buy anything - and pancakes stretched the storecupboard items to feed us all!
    Sometimes they would be savoury. Filled with mushrooms or with comfret or nettle leaves added.Or filled with a can of 'Toast-Toppers'! (Remember them!)...other times they would be sweet filled with stewed fruit or just jam.
    These days one dessert that Mum is often asked for is her pancakes cooked with just a tiny touch of chilli and filled with tangy apple mousse.
     
  8. Ooooooooooooh!
    I could make a food calender... seasonal foods and holiday specials! Maybe mix it up and add sowing times for fruit and veg too!
    That could be fun!
    Just need a good template.... I'll be back.................
     

Share This Page