1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

The Concept of Educated Person

Discussion in 'Social sciences' started by Hassan22, Dec 13, 2011.

  1. <font size="3">Hi all, </font>
    <font size="3">My general response to this question is that, although there can be many characteristics of &lsquo;educated person&rsquo; but for me one of the key marks of an &lsquo;educated person&rsquo; is that, a
    My general take on this is that, currently in the UK and probably elsewhere the model that matters most in education seemed to be enhancing or espousing two things: i) capability' of students to pass summative exam (such as SATs and GCSEs and A level examination results etc and ii) students' employability in the &lsquo;globalised&rsquo; job market (influenced by mainly the notion of international competitiveness).

     
  2. <font size="3">Hi all, </font>
    <font size="3">My general response to this question is that, although there can be many characteristics of &lsquo;educated person&rsquo; but for me one of the key marks of an &lsquo;educated person&rsquo; is that, a
    My general take on this is that, currently in the UK and probably elsewhere the model that matters most in education seemed to be enhancing or espousing two things: i) capability' of students to pass summative exam (such as SATs and GCSEs and A level examination results etc and ii) students' employability in the &lsquo;globalised&rsquo; job market (influenced by mainly the notion of international competitiveness).

     
  3. Philosophy can be so subjective, and the description of an 'educated person' even more so! There can be many definitions to an educated person.

    An educated person is one who is cognizant of self and the society, and is aware of his / her moral and ethical responsibilities.

    He should be able to effectively communicate his thoughts and views to others with clarity; and should be able to listen patiently to others and analyse critically what they say.

    He should develop habits to function effectively in his workplace, yet strike a balance between work and play / recreational activities,

    He should be aware of the importance of maintaining good physical, mental and spiritual health.

    He must be aware of the cross cultural differences between people and be able to accept this. He should be flexible with his thoughts and should be able to relate to people with different ethnicity.

    You can write so much more on this. Let me know if you need more help. You can visit my site www.courseworkwriter.com or email me at support@uktermpaper.com

    Best
    Angie
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    With regard to the second question re aims of education in the uk/elsewhere, there is a hidden curriculum of developing moral reasoning in order to affect actions and bring about a shared consensus of 'common moral values'. For example,in Multi cultural Britain, emphasis has been placed on teaching about the benefits of diversity and in tolerance of racism, which is 'taught' through moral reasoning.
     
  5. Dear Angie,
    Thank you for your well though normative respond. This is very useful insight. In terms of 'cognizant of self' do you mean the notion of self-reflection or self-consciousness? Yes, partly I agree with you that the concept of educated person like the concept of education can be elusive but I am interesting in more about the key marks between an uneducated and an educated person and already you have definitely touched on many marks.
    Thanks very much for sharing this.

     
  6. Dear luvme1,
    Thanks for your excellent respond. I like your line of thought about the notion of 'hidden curriculum of developing moral reasoning' which refers norms and values, about ideas of right and wrong. I also agree with you as you perhaps implying there seemed to be universalism has been a popular view in the curren UK education policy. However, in my view although there seemed to be endorsement universal moral and civic virtues such as integrity, justice, tolerance and so on.
    In regarding multiculturalism or 'the coexistence of groups associated to culturally distinct heritages' is valid point. However, in my view while in policy and political rhetoric this is the case but in practice what is view as the acceptable 'common moral norms and values' is largely determined by the dominant cultural idea and political system whatever that may be (e.g religious, secular, liberalism, nationalism or temporal. Therefore, this is the main problem with the concept of multiculturalism in Britain and elsewhere.
    As a result, in this global arena we are living in, I think one essential mark for an educated person to posses should be 'world-mindness'. In other words, educated person should have a critical open- mindness about the world and other people's way of life, rather than simply conforming to certain established or given orders. What do you think?
    Once again for your contribution.
    Hassan
     

Share This Page