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The coalition government ends of the School Sports Partnerships! Thoughts anyone??

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by funkygirl, Oct 20, 2010.

  1. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter


    The Government has got it spot on.
    With all the money pumped into school sport, why are only 1 in 5 playing competitive games? Even those that play only play in small festivals.
    I experience both sectors but when you look at how much money the SSPs have spent it makes you cry. So little to show for it in terms of quality competition. You have to offer the pupils something they can't get out of school. You can keep fit out of school but it is very difficult to organise an inter-school tournament. This is where SSP staff should have sat down and sorted it all out. Got all the schools together, made sure they had the same PE map, same time of day for PE and planned some fixtures.
     
  2. After reading all of trhese comments I expect you are all secondary sports teachers. From a primary end sports was poor, no sports specialist, very few competitions or festivals. Since the SSP's have been around the impact on the primary sports has been massive, better teaching, more opportunities to do sport, more competitions/festivals and transition work with secondary schools. Yes you are busy in secondary schools but as someone has said thier are 5 or more specialists sport teachers doing training and matches, since the SSP's have been around the primary pupils have had the chance to shine, select sports they would like to go into. The failing of the SSP's has been the lack of support from secondary schools as they have their own agenda how many staff have asked their SSCO what they had done that week, what impact have they had on younger children,.
     
  3. Gogojonny - after sparring with you earlier in the debate just after the news of the axe I have come back to the bookmark to see you are still harping on with the same tired arguments, and with the same repeated objections from almost everyone on here. Give it a rest mate unless you can find enough dissenters like yourself (and not just your laboured opinion) to take on the wealth of qualitative evidence we have provided.
    Oh and by the way ..
    They aren't - the figure is much much higher (speak to any PDM), but the fictional 'analysis' that Gove supposedly conducted on the issue was completely biased towards his hypothesis.
     
  4. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    No - the figure is correct.
    What does your PDM class as competition? Turning up to a basketball competition once a year and playing for 4 minutes?
    You may disagree with my views but that is your choice. Everyone on here is mainly secondary PE or SSCO. A few primary teachers have told a few hard truths, would be good to hear from a few more.
    But you cannot deny the facts - you are paying a person 22-40K a year, who is a movement specialist, to coach sport in secondary schools, often forcing pupils to take part in sports they don't want to do. In primary schools, where pupils are so enthusiastic it is easy to engage them in sport, you have teaching assistants on 12-16K a year, who are not movement specialists, working with children who maybe dyspraxic, ADHD, G&T etc.
     
  5. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    Sorry GGJ but I am getting even more confused. This is what I have picked up so far, that you think:
    • That Primary Schools should have their own specialist PE teachers (agree)
    ·
    <font face="Calibri">That these should be taken from Secondary Schools (disagree)</font>

    <font face="Calibri">That Secondary school PE jobs could be done by qualified coaches (disagree)</font>
    &middot;
    <font face="Calibri">That the main focus of PE in schools is coaching teams (disagree)</font>
    &middot;
    <font face="Calibri">That GCSE (and presumably &lsquo;A&rsquo; Level) PE should be dropped as it is literally a waste
    of time. This should make way for core subjects (disagree)</font>

    <font face="Calibri">That PE teachers are merely &lsquo;movement specialists&rsquo; (disagree, unless by this you are
    implying that all sports involve human movement, there fore we are movement
    specialists, but what about tactics?)</font>
    &middot;
    <font face="Calibri">That the private sector (primary) has better PE provision than state sector
    (probably agree)</font>
    &middot;
    <font face="Calibri">That the private sector (primary) has a better PE programme (probably agree)</font>
    &middot;
    <font face="Calibri">That fitness and health shouldn&rsquo;t have any part in PE as children can &lsquo;pick this up
    outside of school&rsquo; (disagree)</font>

     
  6. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    apologies for the format of the last post, TES is playing silly boogers this morning. It took me 6 attempts and 40 minutes to do it - frustrating[​IMG]
     
  7. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    ... also some that got lost in translation:
    • That most Secondary children are bored and switched off by PE (disagree)
    • That Secondary PE staff have the time to do the work previously done by SSCos and PDMs (disagree)
    My brain hurts now
     
  8. And my dad's bigger than yours mate.

    I'm a primary teacher and have seen all the changes too - 90% of them for the good.

    Anyway, my brain is beginning to hurt too so bye for now and I'll leave with the certain knowledge that, certainly for the bulk of your views, yourself and your pal Mr Gove are definitely in the minority (or will you still deny it when the young ambassadors hand in their 1m petition on 6th Dec?).
     
  9. so do you think school sport is in a healthy state, and is it better off because of the partnerships that hacve been in place?
    Antone who thinks school sport in British schools is working needs to look a bit harder i think.
    Lots of excellentr work being done by lots of excellent teachers, but the far too many yopung people laeve school hating sport/PE/exercise, and far too may gifted students dont see their talent improved upon by schools.
    This is the reality in my view, having been privately educated, worked in the state, private, SEN, coached in the community etc...
     
  10. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    Squashy:
    I haven't been in the UK state sector for over 9 years now (though I did spend 21 years in secondary state schools before leaving for distant shores). My memories of this are that, although not perfect, most children were switched on to PE.
    It seemed to be the only subject where, if a child misbehaved, they could be threatened with being made to sit out/not participate, and that that would bring them into line most of the time.
    So how much of GGJ's philosophy and beliefs do you ascribe to?
     
  11. I feel that he ahs a point about the organising of festivals etc looking good to all and sundry but not actaully making any difference to a childs PE development. I can see where hes coming from when he talks about KS4 PE not being relevant, perhaps a waste of teachers time!
    Having been privatley educated i see the real value of kids playing proper competitive fixtures week in week out, and i feel that the state sector misses out hugley becuase the emphasis isnt there.
    I also agree that primary PE can be a joke in Britain! Before you all start crowing!!! im sure there are brilliant examples of primary PE out there, but i know a lot of schools that rely on coaches coming in after school to up their participation....who are these coaches!?!? what is their knowledge like!?!?! do they care?!?!?
    I know alot of people who were put off sport for life because of their PE experience...if you just asked the question on opinion you would see the anti-PE feeling a lot of people have....
    Should games be saved purely for afterschool clubs? MAybe...
    Should PE be more about understanding your body...finding your favoured kind of exercise, tailering it towards your goals, understanding health and nutrition,? Perhaps
    I do know thouhg, that some PE departments that consider themselves "good" are wretched!
     
  12. Wow, I've been reading through this thread, hoping to get some ideas for Advantages/Disadvantages of the PE cuts in the Education Budget for an University newspaper report (don't worry, your words will not be stolen and any ideas I get from here will be properly referenced ;).

    Reading through this thread has been quite enjoyable but also worrying! I feel as if no one is allowed to expressed their opinion without getting attacked!! Everyone is entitled to an opinion, and no opinion can ever be labelled as right or wrong or be rubbished!! I think if there is to be a discussion on such a controversial topic on the TES people should at least be respectful, rather than, belittling one another! It's not a competition, just a discussion :).

    Sorry, I don't like to get involve in arguments but I felt that someone who is only 18 had to put things into perspective...
     
  13. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    Firstly, the tone of a thread like this is probably going to get a little heated at times. Most of those who have made a number of contributions are obviously passionate about PE/Sport.
    I come from a family of 4 trained PE teachers who have given around 120 years total into the subject (Brother, Father, Uncle,Me). Does this warrant a badge of honour? - no! Does this mean everything I say is right? - No!
    However mine and other's opinions are said with feeling because it matters to us.
    It is great that the likes of squashballs and GGJ have contributed, even though I dont necessarily agree with all they say (particularly GGJ). This means the subject is viewed and considered from lots of angles.
    GGJ has had a lot of stick, but in his defense he hasn't been rude or malicious or offensive (even though the content of his contributions might have been offensive to some). This has been a forthright and generally healthy discussion.
    Unfortunately, this is not a University forum as it might be more considered and polite if it were, but the reality of life is that people will speak as they have done here on a subect like this.
    To expect different is probably a little unrealistic. No offence meant. [​IMG]
     
  14. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  15. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Until you change the current curriculum coaches are best placed to work in secondary schools.
    A PE teacher may have a level 1 award in badminton, compared to a badminton coach who has a level 3. If you are running a badminton session, why can't the badminton coach run it? And don't say 'better class management with a teacher' because for the cost of one PE teacher you would get two badminton coaches - greater coach to pupil ratio thus better behaviour (pupils misbheave in PE because it is often 1: 30 ratio - go and find any sports club that operates on 1:30).
    You have to give pupils a reason to be fit and healthy. The 'don't be obese' line doesn't cut off. Pupils need an activity to be involved in - games, tennis, badminton etc. Secondary PE departments should gear themselves up to put pupils into teams and squads, turning the other PE session into a 'fitness for games' session. You have to offer pupils something they can't get out of school, and by putting them into teams and squads you are encouraging them to take part out of school.
    Face it the secondary state PE system is a mess. You pay a PE teacher to run a football session in school time. But for any of those pupils to take part in a competitive game for the school they have to turn up after school to attend another session ran by the PE staff. Why can't the teams and squads be incorporated into the school day.
     
  16. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Y7 and Y8 love it. Y9 onwards is a joke. Another arguement against Key Stage 4 PE. &pound;25+ per hour to organise a game of football.
     
  17. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    How many minutes do your children spend doing PE each week?
    Be honest - how many minutes, stopping the watch whenever they are inactive.
    How many fixtures have they played this year?
    What % of pupils in your class have represented the school on more than once occassion?
    You can actually achieve a lot more than the SSP without their help.
    Sadly though the petition has been initiated by the SSCOs and PDMs fearing for jobs - it's not about the kids and how best that money can be spent, it is about looking after their jobs.
     
  18. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Welcome back!
    The voice of reality.
     
  19. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Do you believe that every pupil loves PE?
    When you get to Y9 if you threaten them with being made to sit out then they will gladly accept. Lets think - run around outside playing a sport I hate or sat inside doing maths work. Easy one for most Y9s.
    Departments are clueless with regards to engaging Y9+ - and the problem is that these pupils were not engaged early enough. The results are that Year 9 is a difficult year- forgetting kit, lack of attitude, gulf in ability. Then it gets to Year 10 and the 'do what you want' years where the pupils just play football. The pupils leave in Y11 and everything is declared a success. You have to catch them in Y3 - hence why secondary staff would be better in primary schools.
     
  20. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    For primary remove 'Games' from the NC. Install a compulsory games afternoon in every school. Not on the NC, but a structured games programme linked to the local sports club. Less is more - 6 sports, 2 a term.
    PE would then become gymnastics, health related fitness, dance. Include a mutli skills component for KS1. 12 weeks of each throughout the year - one lesson a week.

     

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