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the BGT/X-factor effect?

Discussion in 'Music' started by fretless, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. We are having a 'charity' concert in a few weeks time and have held open auditions - (the concert will be a mix of ensembles and solos from KS4 pupils, drama performances, dance and pupils successful in the auditions). There were a number of very good auditions and we found a couple of pupils with performing skills that we knew nothing about. A number of pupils who were not successful in the auditions held before the Easter holiday were given the opportunity to have another try today having been advised to learn their words etc. It was an 'interesting' set of auditions that left me wondering about several things including .....................
    Why, oh why do they think I will say "yes you can perform a solo/duet on the stage in the school hall in a concert" when they struggle to sing without looking at the words on a youtube Karaoke/don't know when to start singing/look at their feet/mumble/get embarrassed when performing to a very small number of others who are auditioning in the music classroom. One of them said I have to let her perform in the concert because she needs to practice singing in front of a crowd as she will be going on Britain's Got Talent next year. Do more young people believe that they have 'got what it takes' because of these talent shows? do more feel able to have a go? do they have a false understanding of their chances of success?
    I do not want to discourage enthusiasm and will be looking at ways to develop their skills but there will be several 'difficult' conversations tomorrow.
     
  2. We are having a 'charity' concert in a few weeks time and have held open auditions - (the concert will be a mix of ensembles and solos from KS4 pupils, drama performances, dance and pupils successful in the auditions). There were a number of very good auditions and we found a couple of pupils with performing skills that we knew nothing about. A number of pupils who were not successful in the auditions held before the Easter holiday were given the opportunity to have another try today having been advised to learn their words etc. It was an 'interesting' set of auditions that left me wondering about several things including .....................
    Why, oh why do they think I will say "yes you can perform a solo/duet on the stage in the school hall in a concert" when they struggle to sing without looking at the words on a youtube Karaoke/don't know when to start singing/look at their feet/mumble/get embarrassed when performing to a very small number of others who are auditioning in the music classroom. One of them said I have to let her perform in the concert because she needs to practice singing in front of a crowd as she will be going on Britain's Got Talent next year. Do more young people believe that they have 'got what it takes' because of these talent shows? do more feel able to have a go? do they have a false understanding of their chances of success?
    I do not want to discourage enthusiasm and will be looking at ways to develop their skills but there will be several 'difficult' conversations tomorrow.
     
  3. cmf

    cmf

    I have run our version of the x factor for the past 5 yrs and it has been fantasic. It all starts 2nd week in Sept and finishes end of term in Feb.
    We have had students in the past who were thinking of these programs but realised, not through our comments but going through the process, realised it was harder than they thought to even wait for the first audition. Most just thought they only had to turn up!
    Open auditions, boot camp, live rounds then the final.
    Anyone can enter auditions which are behind closed doors, not everyone goes through and we do have some tears.
    Boot camp, each mentor is given a section which changes from year to year
    (1st year: ks3 solo, ks4 solo and groups.
    Yr2: girl solo, boy solo and groups,
    yr3: solo, ks3 groups, ks4 groups
    so you can never tell. We have kept the original format with 3 mentors.
    Each has to get their section down to just 4 acts for the live rounds so this year I had 18 solo boys and had from Sept to Christmas to get them down to just 4.
    The live rounds are held in the hall at lunch times with a 10p entrance fee, (avg 130 students) Students vote for their favorite, the one with the lowest votes goes out. The format goes like this Tusday Solo boys 4 down to 3. Wed Solo girls 4 down to 3 Thurs Groups 4 down to 3.
    This continues until we get down to 1 act per section, so in the final each mentor has an act. The final sees each act sing a fast and a slow song in the first half along with a variety of other performances including all who came to boot camp. During the interval, the votes are counted. The second half sees the act perform with their mentor plus a variety of other performances including last years winner.
    The whole experiance takes over the school for the weeks it is running, its hard work but the end result is always brilliant and students always pick the best act.
    Oh and the prize? Gift vouchers, 3rd £10.00, 2nd £20.00 and 1st £50.00
     
  4. silverfern

    silverfern New commenter

    Fretless,
    Could you video these students performing, so they can appreciate what they look like 'on screen'? I think that this is a valuable experience for any level of performer.
    Perhaps for those that are under the illusion that they are potential-X-Factor-winner material, if they've only ever had positive praise from Mum, Dad, grandparents, etc, then perhaps they don't know what they really sound like?
    Cmf,
    Thanks for the great format idea. It sounds like it's running very successfully at your school.
     
  5. we as a society have long adopted a culture of praising every little thing that our children do regardless of quality. We do this in the mistaken belief that we must build their confidence - this is false. Children need to learn to take criticism earlier on if they are to build resilliance. They also need to learn that in order to impress an adult or even their peers they need to try harder than simply show up. My daughter has particular trouble with this in relation to magic tricks, which she is desperate nto be good zt but will only practice once before she thinks she is ready to show them. She is 9 and has passed grade exams, so I don't understand why she does not make the connection between sustained effort and reward, its a m mystery.
     
  6. Thank you for your comments and thank you cmf for sharing how you organise your talent event. I now have my performers selected so it is full steam ahead with rehearsals. Interestingly I have had similar issues with some of my GCSE group this year who just don't seem to understand that they need to practice something until they get it right.
     

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