1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

The Beginners' Exercise Thread

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by Eva_Smith, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    Hi everyone,
    Following a discussion over on personal I decided to start this thread. I was seeking advice about running because, even though I have done lots of other exercise in the past, I've never been able to run. That's got to change though because I'm entered for the Race for Life in May and am determined to be able to run the whole thing, no walking.
    I was going to just start a thread about learning to run, but I realised that, whilst we have lots of threads about dieting and eating (or lack thereof!) we don't have any dedicated exercise threads for those who are wanting to start to exercise, or who already exercise but what to improve or learn something new.
    I thought this could be a place to share workout tips, to keep a record on what we've been up to and the progress we're seeing.

    I'll start with the running thing. I know that EmiW has already offered to give me some advice. I need tips on how to move from jogging/walking to being able to....run!
    So far, during half term, I've been jogging/running/walking on Sunday (about 4km), Monday (about 4km), Tuesday (about 5.5km), Thursday (3.5km) and Friday (3.8km).
    I'm not yet able to run the whole way round, I have to do intervals, but admittedly I don't time them, I tend to just keep running as long as I can and then walk for a minute or so to recover before going again.
    EmiW....any advice? Or anyone else for that matter?
    Join in by recording your workouts and sharing your tips on running or any other sport/workouts.
     
  2. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    Hi everyone,
    Following a discussion over on personal I decided to start this thread. I was seeking advice about running because, even though I have done lots of other exercise in the past, I've never been able to run. That's got to change though because I'm entered for the Race for Life in May and am determined to be able to run the whole thing, no walking.
    I was going to just start a thread about learning to run, but I realised that, whilst we have lots of threads about dieting and eating (or lack thereof!) we don't have any dedicated exercise threads for those who are wanting to start to exercise, or who already exercise but what to improve or learn something new.
    I thought this could be a place to share workout tips, to keep a record on what we've been up to and the progress we're seeing.

    I'll start with the running thing. I know that EmiW has already offered to give me some advice. I need tips on how to move from jogging/walking to being able to....run!
    So far, during half term, I've been jogging/running/walking on Sunday (about 4km), Monday (about 4km), Tuesday (about 5.5km), Thursday (3.5km) and Friday (3.8km).
    I'm not yet able to run the whole way round, I have to do intervals, but admittedly I don't time them, I tend to just keep running as long as I can and then walk for a minute or so to recover before going again.
    EmiW....any advice? Or anyone else for that matter?
    Join in by recording your workouts and sharing your tips on running or any other sport/workouts.
     
  3. Gardening Leaves

    Gardening Leaves New commenter

    Hi Eva

    If you don't know it already, try:

    www.running4women.com

    I find it invaluable. It caters for everyone from complete beginners to experienced marathon runners, gives great advice on training, nutrition, footwear, injuries etc and can pair runners for support. I think it s great.
     
  4. akz

    akz New commenter

    The run/walk system is definitely the way to start. However, the tough bit is ensuring you are actually building, even if it is only by a minute or so a time. We quickly get comfortable running or jogging (not sure there is much of a difference really) for a set time and we have to push beyond our comfort zone to go to the next level.
    For me at first it was moving from 30mins to 45mins and more recently, taking my running from 2hrs 30 to 3hrs (training for a marathon).
    You need to respect the slow build, but if you never push yourself to the next step you will not see the progress.
    In addition you need consistency, especially with running. You need to make sure you are heading out 3 times a week over a consistent period of time and just build up one of those runs at the time. So perhaps 2 walk/ runs of 30 mins and then 1 walk/ run where you try to push the time up (either total time or time running).
    Good luck and try to have some fun with it too.
     
  5. Gardening Leaves

    Gardening Leaves New commenter

    Oops! I also meant to suggest that you do a search on iTunes podcasts for "running" and "intervals training". I have forgotten ther nname of thew one I used to use but there is a fantastic program (its American...) which provides music for running intervals at every level. I found it very useful for building stamina, distance and time.
     
  6. How do you know when too much is too much? I perceive myself as notoriously unfit despite the hospital's assertion that I am as fit as a flea and the picture of health and can in my defence manage a whole hour of sweating through Zumba without collapsing.
    But I went for a taster day at a gym recently and the trainer wired me up to a treadmill and set me first briskly walking and then running. After ten minutes of running he was sufficiently concerned at my (naturally fast) heartbeat to stop and advise me to see my GP, who laughed like a drain.
    Is there some kind of warning, apart from clutching your heart and going blue, that tells you that the pain barrier, the burn, is in fact notifying you that you've overdone it?
     
  7. Eva, I would have a look on Runner's World - the forums and the website are full of tips and useful articles geared to anyone from beginners to experienced marathon runners.
    You mentioned having the nike app which sounds good as it mentioned your pacing. If you are tiring easily running despite having a good level of fitness it sounds as though you are maybe setting off too fast. Try picking a set time you want to run a kilometre or mile in, and sticking to that, then trying to get faster throughout the run.
    I would second the advice on the run/walk method but I think to see consistent improvement you should time your intervals so that you can keep extending them. There are some good run/walk programs on runners world that can be adapted to suit different distances.
    Lastly, I'm sure I asked this before but have you been to a running shop to get proper shoes fitted by someone that watches you run? I found that these shoes made an incredible difference and really supported my feet and legs.
    Lily, I think trainers in the gym just have to cover themselves, hence the advice to see a GP after a short run! If you feel faint or dizzy, as opposed to a wee bit out of breath then thats a sign you need to stop. I usually exercise if I have a slight cold, but I went for a run once when I had a cough and was properly wheezing when I got back, and I think that was a sign I needed to take it easy.
     
  8. Three quick ones, including two for treadmill runners as people often start there:

    • For a distance run aim to build up to running in each week the distance you intend to run on the day. So for a half marathon aim to run 12-13 miles altogether in the weeks before the actual run. This isn't actually all that far- 2 or 3 miles a day is enough (and makes it seem achievable!). A couple of longer practice runs are in order.
    • Speed-wise it's better (particularly on a treadmill) to vary either side of your desired average than try to maintain it for the whole time. E.g. If you want to average 10kph do 2 minutes at 8kph then 2 mins at 12kph.
    • On a treadmill make sure you have a slight incline as it's much better on your knees. 1.0 is enough on most machines.
     
  9. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    There is a way of working out your maximum heart rate. It's only estimated unless measured by a doctor, but essentially for a woman it's 226 minus your age, and for a man 220 minus age.
    This gives the maximum heart rate. Then you calculate your target heart rate for exercise:
    For weight loss/burning fat - 60 - 70% of your max heart rate.
    To increase stamina/endurance - 70 - 80%
    Elite athletes work at 90 - 100% of their max heart rate.

    That said, working at 70 - 80% is going to also burn fat. So my max heart rate is approximately 197; I tend to work out at about 155 to 165, so that SHOULD put me in the right area for improving my fitness.
    I'd imagine, Lily, that your heart rate was so high because you were being asked to run for ten minutes, which isn't an exercise you'd normally do. If someone asked me to run for 10 solid minutes 6 months ago, I wouldn't have made it past 50 seconds without keeling over.
     
  10. I truly don't wish to appear subversive, but may I please put in a plea for non runners. It isn't for everyone. there seems to be a belief that running is the only way to get fit and lose weight. I walk as you know and find that I am getting a good workout as I am able to increase speed. Swimming is brilliant exercise and particularly good if, like me, you are quite a bit overweight. I don't cycle but would imagine that it too would be good.
    I have looked at Zumba and it looks like fun although there are no classes in my area. T'ai chi is said to be good - was that you spool who said you'd lost 2 stone doing that?
    That's it. just to say there ae alternatives to running. To all runners out there - you are amazing, well done.
     
  11. The irony :)
    Of?
     
  12. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    Could I ask you to read the OP more thoroughly Cosmos, then perhaps rethink your post.

    I'm posting about running because I've just taken it up. Lily is posting here but I'm pretty sure she has no intention of running.
     
  13. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    Let me help you:
     
  14. Oh Eva, I wasn't responding to you personally. Why so touchy? The title of the thread is beginners exercise. Most people here have spoken about running - I am merely putting in a word for alternative forms of exercise. C'est tout.
     
  15. How is the walking going cosmos?
    I am desperate to get out and walking again. I keep asking my physio every week when I can start but I can't yet [​IMG]
    I like Zumba, but it isn't very good on the joints.
     
  16. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    I realise that, Cosmos, but over on personal EmiW and I got a conversation going about me learning to run and we merely continued it over on this thread. I'm not being touchy, but the first, what, 6 posts on a thread happened to be about running; that's hardly enough to suggest that the only type of fitness ever going to be discussed is running.
    If that's what people want to talk about, so be it.
     
  17. It's going grand PFF - I am sorry you aren't fit enough yet; don't rush it though, you don't want to set back progress. I am up to 2 1/2 miles now non stop at a lickety spit pace and feel really good at the end of it. It is all up and down hilld and fields so the muscles are getting a good workout.
    I do that twice a day, although the second walk is a little shorter as the poor dog can't manage it - he is getting on with twinge of arthritis. I also walk into the village 2 mile round trip - uphill there (puff, puff).
    I love it even in grotty weather.
     
  18. It is so depressing to go from powerwalking 26.2 miles without batting an eyelid to now struggling just to walk over the road to the shops!
     
  19. I didn't say people couldn't talk about running Eva. All I am saying is that there are alternative forms of exercise.
    Ok? Happy with that?

     

Share This Page