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The 70s & Life on Mars.

Discussion in 'Personal' started by George1164, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. Given the thread about life in the 70s, I wondered who would like to do a 'Sam Tyler' and wake up in 1973; either as you were then, as you are now, or something in between?
     
  2. I was 8 in 1973 and living in Hong Kong. I have fond memories of that time. I loved my school, had loads of friends who lived in the same block of flats. We spend most of the time mucking about in and around the flats or at the pool. I know things were getting tough in the UK at that time with 3 day weeks and so on, but it all passed me by.
    Being that 8 year old again seems rather appealing, but I'd miss out on all the adolescent angst that followed a few years later.
    I can't imagine what it must have been like to be an adult at that time, but my Mum and Dad seem to think that life is tougher now - or is that a case of rose tinted specs?
     
  3. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    I left school in 1973 so if I went back to that time with the knowledge and experience I have now I'd probably make a better job of it. Really, though, I think things are better now.
    I can remember the casual sexism and racism that was the norm then, like 'Life on Mars'. Also, in many ways the effects of World War II were still being felt including some appalling housing, most of those smart millionaires' houses in Stoke Newington or Clifton in Bristol were terrible bed-sits and squats at that time because no-one, least of all the landlords, had the wherewithal to do anything with them. l knew of families living in squalid rooms sharing bathrooms with drug users and long council waiting lists.
    On the other hand, the New Town where I grew up was a clean, reasonably pleasant place to live with almost full employment in the new light industries - IBM, Honeywell etc..
     
  4. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    I don't think I'd want to go back to 1973 as I was then.
    I was a very confused, troubled child back then. I would have been about 12 years old.
    I had struggled my way through Primary School and passed the 11+, so I was one of the select few from my Primary to get into Grammar School. I was considered exceptoiopnally bright but low-achieving.I was quiet and reserved, hardly speaking, and wandered around the playground on my own at break. ....About a year ago Mum had started the battle to find out why I was 'different' and to get me the support I needed. At this point we had a diagnosis of 'Clumsy Child Syndrome' - the oh-so-charming term for what we today call Dyspraxia, and was waiting to be tested (in about a year) for Dyslexia.....This sort of thing took time back then, and it would be years before we understood that I have ASD.
    I would love to go back and meet Mum - and somehow let her know that she was doing the right thing. It was a real struggle for her - bringing up a large family, fighting to keep me in Mainstream School - and at home with the family! (birthdad wanted me 'shut away in a home somewhere') - Nothing I do or say will ever be able to repay her for what she did for me (and still does!)...... I would love to be able to go back as my younger self and give her the hugs and thanks that I hadn't learned how to at that point in my life. (Yes, I can and do give her them now - and have done for years - but I have a couple of decades to make up for!)
    I'd love to go back as my adult self - if there was someway of proving who I was! ....I'd love to show people just what I was able to achieve in the end....I'd love to meet my old Maths teacher (who used to spend more time in class repairing clocks than he did actually teaching us Maths!) and tell him 'thankyou'... yes he was eccentric and had more than one screw loose if not missing, but he had such a passion for Maths - and he passed the passion on to me - He showed me how beautiful and ordered and compelling the world of maths as - the actual maths I taught myself, the passion came from him! I;d love him to know I became a Maths teacher too!....I'd love to meet the ogress of a PE teacher who made me stand out in the rain for hours watching the others play sports (I was excused becasue of the Dyspraxia) - I'm guessing she was a much nicer person than I realised!
    Sam Tyler didn't go back and relive his life....and I wouldn't want to do that - I was confused, scared and trapped in a world I didn;t understand - but I eventually learned to cope - in my own twisted, individual and wonderful way.....but he had the opportunity to experience as an adult the world he only knew as a child. ...I have this sneaking suspicion that if I went back I'd want to do some of the kid's stuff that I missed out on!

     
  5. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    If I could go back to 1973 as am now I would deposit a 5 litre container of industrial strength Clearasil on the doorstep of my house, along with an anonymous note saying "Don't waste any more time trying to impress Linda - she's not interested. PS: Stop b*ggering around in French - you might need it one day."
     
  6. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    I was 8 and living in HK too - are you me?
     
  7. Wow! Where did you go to school?
     
  8. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    Beacon Hill and then KGV
     
  9. My mother unfashionably says that it doesn't matter what decade you grow up in as long as you learn to play the game to your advantage, and it hasn't done her any harm. Hero: Peggy from Madmen/.
    Disclaimer: etc etc
     
  10. Don't know Beacon Hill. I was at the school based in Victoria Army Barracks (can't remember it's name). Is that KGV?
     
  11. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    No, King George V (KGV) wasn't a service school - small(ish) world though!
     
  12. Ah, that's a shame, I was really excited for a while. Were those schools in Kowloon? We were on HK island.
     
  13. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    Yes, both were on Kowloon
    10c for the Star Ferry, Dairy Farm nutty nibbles and a ride on the Peak Tram . . .
     
  14. Ha ha, perhaps we passed each other on Star Ferry or at the top of The Peak.
    (sorry to hi-jack the thread)
     
  15. impis

    impis New commenter

    Gawd, I'd LOVE to go back to 1973. I was fit, slim and pretty back then, and in love for the first time. The music was great and I loved the fashions. I was happy, confident, and enchanted with life. Carefree, that's what I was. Ahhhhhh, yes. Definately, I'd go back.
     
  16. I would dearly love to go back to the summer of 1972, which I spent tearing around the scenery on a BSA Lightning, without having to wear a crash helmet. (The helmet law did not come in until June 1973). I was 17 years old and between the first and second years in the Sixth Form. In those days, the First Year Sixth was a sort of rest cure between the traumata of O and A levels. Then, school sixth forms were loosely affiliated to the NUS, so we used to pop into the local Uni's SU and get cheap tickets to gigs at places like the Marquee and the Roundhouse, usually in the middle of the week, and then rip up the M4 into London. The liberty afforded by access to London gave you scope to experiment with 'certain substances'. Under the influence of one of these, I once rode all the way home without putting on my biker jacket. I felt great at the time but the upper half of me looked like unbaked dough, due to the cold.
    In those days, if you wanted some money, there were opportunities to earn it. I lived near a food canning factory, which was always looking for casual workers for the night-shift. You were supposed to be over 19 to do night shifts but nobody cared. The shift was 11 hours, 4 of which were at overtime rates. At the end of the shift, you had to go to the office, put an unreadable squiggle on a form and you were paid out in cash. I just turned up, did a few nights, and the money earned kept me going for the next week.
    Happy days!
     

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