1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Testy Response from Minister

Discussion in 'Education news' started by jacaford, May 7, 2016.

  1. jacaford

    jacaford New commenter

    The Depratment for Education this morning mounted a robust defence of the coming week’s SATs tests for 11-year olds in response to growing criticism from parents and teachers about the level and content of this year’s tests. They berated the short-termism behind the criticism, stating that it is necessary to take the long view. Given last week’s U-turn on academies, this is all the more important – if state schools do not meet threshold standards they can be forced into compulsory academisation even under the new Plan B.

    The Department was bullish about the content of the so called Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar test, shamefully abbreviated to the SPAC test in the first press briefing seen by this journalist. Secretary of State Nicky Martian commented that for decades ordinary decent people have had to endure illiteracy in signs such as “Pomigranit’s, 4 for £5” when they go to buy their fresh produce at market stalls. Clearly there was a need to better educate those with low aspirations destined to write their own signs on bits of cardboard and for those who may spend their weekends selling **** at car-boot sales.

    Off the record, one insider did admit that there was an in-built fudge on the maths levels required for children to reach the “acceptable standard”. Mathematics would be scored out of a total of 110 and any academies scoring poorly would be given dispensation to report their children’s raw scores as if they were in fact percentages. Obviously this course of action would not be appropriate for Local Authority run schools since they have not opted for the additional freedoms offered by conversion to academy status.

    When asked to explain why such tests are not used in the private sector, the Schools’ Minister, Mr Glibb grew exasperated. “If we get this right, in years to come, it can be the state educated children who draft the speeches and articles for the elite. And anyway, why would any aspiring Tory need to understand the present or future progressive?” he said.
     
    delnon likes this.
  2. stupot101

    stupot101 Established commenter

    ....., the Schools’ Minister, Mr Glibb grew exasperated. “If we get this right, in years to come, it can be the state educated children who draft the speeches and articles for the elite. And anyway, why would any aspiring Tory need to understand the present or future progressive?” he said.[/QUOTE]

    LOL:):D
     
  3. Scintillant

    Scintillant Star commenter

    Why is the accepted standard and its associated (scaled) score not declared beforehand?
     
    SportyK likes this.
  4. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    Did you watch Osborne with Peston this morning?
    He seems convinced that academisation will prevail. He commented that, forcing schools hasn't worked but that LA's wouldn't have long term capacity to support underperforming schools. They're playing the long game now.
     
    Lara mfl 05 and wanet like this.
  5. Jesmond12

    Jesmond12 Star commenter

    Because they have no idea what it is yet. Once all the scores have been collated then they will decide what the age related expectation is.

    I agree with you they should have published the scaled score for age related. But then if most of the country was below this then how would the DFE explain this? Stand by for a huge fudge!
     
    delnon and Lara mfl 05 like this.
  6. Scintillant

    Scintillant Star commenter

    Yes, my question was rhetorical, of course!

    What a complete farago.
     
    delnon, Jesmond12 and Lara mfl 05 like this.
  7. Benbamboo

    Benbamboo Occasional commenter

    All the nonsense about the test being rigorously sampled and taking months to get right should give a good idea about what they're looking at if it's true.

    However, now that Morgan has said no more than 1% of extra schools would be below floor standards, they've at least got the wriggle room for some major fudging.

    Nothing left to do now but wait until July and see what happens. Then some serious questions will either need to be asked or will satisfactorily answered. I fear it's the former and we're in for another year of crippling workloads trying again with a new/reformed system
     
  8. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    Heaves a big sigh...And the cycle continues. Just like the humanure system.
     
  9. jacaford

    jacaford New commenter

    Yes I heard him. I agree - they're determined they'll get their way. If it can't be done via their first method, they'll simply come up with another method.
     

Share This Page