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TES English Teaching - Moving Ds to Cs!

Discussion in 'English' started by BethMitchell, Mar 13, 2011.

  1. BethMitchell

    BethMitchell New commenter

    As a member of the TES English panel I'm planning on getting together some fantastic resources, ideas and helpful tips on how to move and motivate D grade pupils to that magical C.


    If you have any ideas, lessons, etc that fit please send them my way!


    For example, to help motivate boys in the classroom I ask everyone in the class to draw a small box in the upper right corner of their exercise books. They need to divide it in half and label one box with 'S' for speaking and the other 'L' for listening. Every time a pupil makes a thoughtful comment, I ask them to put a tick in their speaking box. You can also give ticks in the listening box for pupils who get to work right away or show that they are engaged with the work. The immediate praise for boys works a treat! It also adds a bit of competition - you can give prizes for earning a certain number of ticks. I've used speaking and listening boxes for about three years now and it always works!
     
  2. BethMitchell

    BethMitchell New commenter

    As a member of the TES English panel I'm planning on getting together some fantastic resources, ideas and helpful tips on how to move and motivate D grade pupils to that magical C.


    If you have any ideas, lessons, etc that fit please send them my way!


    For example, to help motivate boys in the classroom I ask everyone in the class to draw a small box in the upper right corner of their exercise books. They need to divide it in half and label one box with 'S' for speaking and the other 'L' for listening. Every time a pupil makes a thoughtful comment, I ask them to put a tick in their speaking box. You can also give ticks in the listening box for pupils who get to work right away or show that they are engaged with the work. The immediate praise for boys works a treat! It also adds a bit of competition - you can give prizes for earning a certain number of ticks. I've used speaking and listening boxes for about three years now and it always works!
     

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