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teaching verb agreements to Y2!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by iamsmile, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. Hi all,
    I am a student teacher, currently planning for TP2 in a Year 2 class. One of the objectives the Class Teacher has asked me to cover is subject / verb agreements - particularly am / are.

    I'm just wondering how much detail I need to go into? My first TP was in a Year 5 class so I am worried about pitching my lessons too high! Do I need to go into recognising the subject of a sentence etc or just teach them which verb to use when?!

    Thanks :)
     
  2. Hi all,
    I am a student teacher, currently planning for TP2 in a Year 2 class. One of the objectives the Class Teacher has asked me to cover is subject / verb agreements - particularly am / are.

    I'm just wondering how much detail I need to go into? My first TP was in a Year 5 class so I am worried about pitching my lessons too high! Do I need to go into recognising the subject of a sentence etc or just teach them which verb to use when?!

    Thanks :)
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Definitely wouldn't go into too much detail for yr 2.
    What I often say is 'For those of you who want to know this is the subject-verb agreement, but you won't need to know & remember these words until you're much older!'. Means my G & T can be extended a little, and may well ask questions,
    but for the majority of the class I would just ask them to distinguish between I am (just one person) & we are ( more than one), he/she is (one person) & they are (more than one)
    . Very simplistic I know but in year 2 we do need to make it fairly simple.
     
  4. Brilliant, thank you :) I didn't think they would need to know in that much detail, but just wanted to be sure!!
     
  5. For starters, I think you mean is/are as am is only ever used with 'I' and not, in my experience, ever used wrongly whereas is and are (along with was and were) are often misused.
    All I can say is the best of luck as children use these rightly or wrongly depending, to a large extent, on what they hear and pick up in the home and on TV* and that can depend on class and dialect.
    Re. good example, whiteboard exemplars are too fleeting. Have large examples written on card and permanently visible. Write the 'He is ', 'She was' in blue and the we/you/they examples in orange. 'I was seven last week.'
    I am sure there will be many more useful suggestions on offer and, on paper, you may get some progress but altering speech to 'correct' form will be an uphill struggle (Try counting those grammatical mistakes in an episode of 'Eastenders'and weep!)

     
  6. Thanks Nooil, some good ideas there!

    Yes, the objective is am / are - I have the long term plans and they say 'particularly I am / we are'! I see where you are coming from re not being mistaken often though :)

    With regards to it being an uphill struggle... Yes you are probably right! But on the other hand, if we didn't bother trying because of that we'd just be making sure none of them ever got it wouldn't we? :)
     
  7. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Taking up one of no-oilpaintings ideas in another thread where she suggested payment for spotting "thay" in books etc, you could make a long-term game over spotting "we was", "you was" etc cropping up in classroom talk.
    Children could push a buzzer and score a point each time they hear an error of this nature ....... the trouble is that for the first few days with a year 2 class you would hear nothing apart from the buzzer for the first few days.

    Or maybe give them all a buzzer and an episode of East Enders to watch, and leave the room.

     
  8. jog_on

    jog_on New commenter

    Regarding spotting mistakes, we put our crowns on when we walk in the classroom, so we are speaking correctly when we are in lessons. Maybe this could help.
    As for teaching this, I think it's really important that you don't just say we are and they are, rather "Julie and I are..." and "Fred and John are..." etc.
    Try games like sentence making - hand out cards with various words on which make sentences and they should try to include the correct conjugation of the verb. You might also want to touch upon I am - I was i.e. present and past tense.
    Good luck! :)
     
  9. Love the 'crowns' idea, jog_on, I can see me using that!!
     
  10. Anyone remember Laurie Lee in Cider with Rosie being very disappointed after his first day at school after being told to 'sit there for the present' - and not getting one...?
    Starting sentences with Today, Yesterday and Tomorrow should help that group whose vocabulary is poor and for whom words like tense and subject are just plain unnecessary when you discover just how impoverished their vocabulary actually is.
    ("Julie and I" eh? there's posh! How have you excised "Me and Julie" ? )
    As for Iams, points taken, but as one at the far end of a career, who has seen reading for pleasure crumble as this Gradgrindian focus on deconstruction and the minutiae - try reading 'Seeing to the Heart' by Marie Peel '67 and Amazonable. She knows what words are really for.

     

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