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teaching time without a worksheet?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by jillguy40, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. jillguy40

    jillguy40 New commenter

    having had those lovely visitors in today a fellow teacher was told that you do not teach time with a work sheet or by explaining that quarter past is quarter of the way around the clock and the same with half past too. How do you teach time?
     
  2. jillguy40

    jillguy40 New commenter

    having had those lovely visitors in today a fellow teacher was told that you do not teach time with a work sheet or by explaining that quarter past is quarter of the way around the clock and the same with half past too. How do you teach time?
     
  3. sara2323

    sara2323 New commenter

    Not sure what age group that was, but in my year 2 class I have used the activity clocks and got chn to make different times. For independant activites children picked cards from table and made the time using their clocks. Lots of practiceal hands on acitivies making different times before drawing hands on clocks on a worksheet. I'm a NQT so not sure if that's the way others teach it.
     
  4. What nonsense! Quarter past is quarter of the way round the clock and half past is halfway round!!! Hence the words quarter and half!! I understand that worksheets shouldn't be over used, BUT they do have there place. I have and will continue to use worksheets to practise skills such as telling the time!!!
     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I wouldn't generally teach time with worksheets either. I might have some out for choosing activities or some such, but not as a teaching resource.

    I use individual write on/ wipe off clocks with space under for writing the time. And, of course, large teacher clocks.

    But then again Ofsted told me the difference between satisfactory and outstanding would have been for the children to use whiteboards in the starter instead of their fingers, so what do they know about maths teaching!
     
  6. You use geared clocks, activity cards e.g show me a time, a big clock on the IWB, computer programmeswhere they match analogue to digital clocks, looking at timetables, tv timetables etc to make it real. You learn the different units of time, find out what you can do in a minute etc, you teach them how to solve word problems... Joe went out at 9.30 and came in at 10.30. How long was he out? You and any visitors, head, governors,Ofsted are all impressed at the children's ability to tell the time and THEN... you do a SAT paper that requires the child to accurately place the hands to show half past, quarter to etc and you discover That because they haven't practised recording on a
    Wait for it...

    WORKSHEET, they can't do it, no matter how many clocks they have looked at, played with etc etc. you can't teach time with just a worksheet, but if you never use one, the children will not succeed.
    As for half past and quarter past if they have grasped fractions of a shape, they should not find that too difficult.
     
  7. What annoys me is how ofsted observe a snippit of a lesson and make a judgement, if they don't see something they simply presume you can't/don't do it. I'm sure everyone would use lots of practical methods to teach time/money etc but worksheets do have there place to practise/assess skills.
     
  8. jillguy40

    jillguy40 New commenter

    thank you everyone for your quick responses. We also use actual clocks for them to turn and how much can you do in one minute an hour etc. We use the smart board with a big clock and problem solving was also included in the lesson. Just really felt for my colleague as I teach it this way.
     
  9. cally1980

    cally1980 Established commenter

    Did they not suggest how else she could have done it during feedback? No point in telling someone that what they are doing is not ok if you are not going to also suggest ways they should be doing it!
     
  10. roise

    roise New commenter

    My personal way round this is to have them cut out pictures of clocks with a time underneath stick it in their book and draw on the hands. Not a hundred miles away from a worksheet but different enough to keep observers happy i've found.
     
  11. And also a complete waste of maths teaching time when they are cutting and sticking for the majority of the time! But as long as it isn't a worksheet and satisfies Ofsted.

    (Im not blaming you, I just can't stand this worksheet-hating culture when worksheets really do have their place!!)
     
  12. cally1980

    cally1980 Established commenter

    I did similar for reading scales! Not the most imaginitive lesson ever but we are doing capacity tomorrow and I wanted to be sure that they are able to read a scale prior to getting the water out!
     
  13. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I hate the cut and stick maths lessons as well. Nearly as much as I hate the colouring in ones (bar charts, etc)!
     

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