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Teaching regulatory authority

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by Rlh1969, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. Rlh1969

    Rlh1969 New commenter

    Dear All

    Have been accused of misconduct.

    Financial, but deny it totaly.

    No police charge or anything like that.

    Here is my question.

    I am a qualified teacher, but work in HE.

    Can they still refer me to TRA?
     
  2. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    TRA documents consistently refer to teachers. A cursory look at the subject matter hasn't enlightened me.

    You have QTS but are not employed as a "teacher"? Policy of your institution ought to be studied. Also contact your union at once.
     
  3. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter

    Union. ASAP.
     
  4. Rlh1969

    Rlh1969 New commenter

    Thanks, union membership lapsed.

    Lots of threats.
     
  5. shevington

    shevington Occasional commenter

    If you are in a Union, ring the Regional Centre this morning. You will find the number on the Union main web page.

    If you are not in a Union it is too late to join. Its likely to be Citizens Advice or Solicitor if you need help.
     
  6. scienceteachasghost

    scienceteachasghost Lead commenter

    This thread should serve as a reminder to all to get your union subs up to date and join a union if you are not in one. You might think you are safe, things can turn at the drop of a hat in any workplace.

    If you are innocent can you find proof?

    If it’s a ‘grey area’ could you plead ignorant or find rules tha5 impl6 your innocence?

    If guilty maybe confess and you will just get a warning?

    Good luck!
     
    FrankWolley likes this.
  7. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter


    Seek support from a specialist employment solicitor then. This will cost you (a lot?) more, but you need legal advice at this stage, not when the case has been decided...
     
  8. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    My understanding is that the remit Teaching Regulation Agency does not include HE, ie TRA does not cover post-18 education. Prohibition notices say that a teacher is barred from teaching "in any school, sixth form college, relevant youth accommodation or children’s home in England". They define a teacher not by whether they have QTS (as teachers in academies don't have to have QTS) but by whether the person "is employed or engaged to carry out teaching work" at a school, sixth form college (including a 16 - 19 academy), relevant youth accommodation or children’s home". No mention of HE.

    But please don't take my word for it, get professional advice.

    The point is academic of course if the internal misconduct hearing finds you 'not guilty', so good luck with that.
     
  9. Rlh1969

    Rlh1969 New commenter

    Dear All

    Thank you for your quick response and advice.

    I honestly cannot thank you enough.

    I have spoken at length to a Solicitor (whose come not was this is S..t) and a barrister whose comment was ( I can see no crime or issue here).

    However the TRA, if I can be referred, run by different rules.

    I do not want to put specific details on an open forum.

    Might it be possible for me to email some specific details.

    Rott Wieller especially,

    Thank you all.
     
  10. sabram86

    sabram86 Occasional commenter

    As always, it is a practical decision as well as a legal one.

    The TRA require a referral from somewhere, whether the police, school, public, etc. I don't know why a university would make that procedurally in the same way a school would in most circumstances, certainly not where there are no safeguarding issues.

    If the matter is referred, the misconduct alleged must be serious (to either a criminal or professional standard). Mere incompetence or stealing pens would not suffice.

    The final hurdles are the burden of proof and sanction, which does allow for not being prohibited from teaching, depending on the circumstances. Final appeal lies to the Queen's Bench of the High Court.
     

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