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teaching out of my subject

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by jj_powell, Sep 27, 2009.

  1. Hi
    My school is short of teachers and i have been asked to teach out of my subject to help out, I'm an NQT and feel its an added burden, someone mentioned to me that i should be paid extra for doing this also if i feel its getting too much can i decline in doing it any more

    Can someone clarify the situation for me

    Many thanks
     
  2. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    The induction regulations advise that NQTs should not teach outside of their trained subject
    in the induction year. Its hard enough already without having to learn another subject content.
    Regulations are on teachernet
     
  3. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    If it's too much for you, then refuse.
    And the person who said you should get paid more if you agree (but you said it's too much, so you won't be agreeing, will you?) is completely wrong.
     
  4. As a NQT you need to ensure that first and foremost you are able to meet the induction standards. By taking on an extra unnecessary burden you could be in danger of jeopardising meeting the standards as your attention will be split between your main subject and having to learn a new subject. There is no regulation that prevents a NQT taking on teaching in another subject and, likewise, there is no regulation which states that you should be paid more money - if a Head decides to reward it then fine, but a head is not obliged to do so.
    If at this stage you see it as an extra burden and then I would not start and hope to drop it later is things get tough. Once agreements are made and timetables set they become very difficult to change (I know, I took on a temp job once, to cover a maternity leave, teaching outside my main subject and was still doing it six years later - no not a long pregnancy - the person didn't ever come back). In my case it wasn't too bad and I wasn't a probationer and learned on the job and ended up enjoying it. But I wouldn't do it a s a NQT.
    James
     
  5. Don't do it! I say this from personal experience. I taught outside of my main subject for the first two terms of induction and now I am completely up **** creek in terms of evidence/passing my NQT year. It's not worth the added hassle this year - you have enough on your plate as an NQT without piling more on.
     
  6. Hi jj_Powell.
    Just to let you know what I think. Last term I passed one terms induction as an NQT teaching out of my own subject, it was tough, but I had a lot to gain - lack of vacancies etc in my own subject. I was supply NQT
     
  7. And I thought I was the only one... I am an NQT and am now teaching 3 subjects, 2 outside my specialist subject. I was told today, 2 minutes before a lesson that I would be taking on a new subject as from tomorrow. I made it clear that I needed time to think about it as I would be teaching 2 subjects that I am not trained for and would let them know. 3 hours later I was handed the resources for the new subject without giving my final answer.
    Just checking the NASUWT site- " The right not to teach outside the age range or subject for which you have been trained. <font face="AvantGarde-Book" size="1">The purpose of induction is to allow you to build upon the skills and expertise you gained during your initial teacher training. This is not possible if you are required to teach, on a regular basis, an age group or subject beyond the scope of your training". Problem is as an NQT, I don't feel that I can wave the union card at them as a new member of staff. Any advice would be really welcome! </font>
     
  8. And I thought I was the only one... I am an NQT and am now teaching 3 subjects, 2 outside my specialist subject. I was told today, 2 minutes before a lesson that I would be taking on a new subject as from tomorrow. I made it clear that I needed time to think about it as I would be teaching 2 subjects that I am not trained for and would let them know. 3 hours later I was handed the resources for the new subject without giving my final answer.
    Just checking the NASUWT site- " The right not to teach outside the age range or subject for which you have been trained. The purpose of induction is to allow you to build upon the skills and expertise you gained during your initial teacher training. This is not possible if you are required to teach, on a regular basis, an age group or subject beyond the scope of your training". Problem is as an NQT, I don't feel that I can wave the union card at them as a new member of staff. Any advice would be really welcome!
     
  9. Calgon
    This is a case where you need help and support from your union. There is no statutory rule which forbids teaching outside your subject area, but the guidance makes it clear that:
    as a NQT your school/head
    "should not normally demand teaching outside the age range and/or subject(s) for which the NQT has been employed to teach;" (NQT Guidance p.9)
    In your case teaching that many subjects outside your expertise and 'dropping in a new one' at very short notice is, in my view, going against the statutory guidance, clear and simple.
    If you are not confident about tackling this on your own, contact your union. Make it clear that this is about protecting your induction, since a failure of induction can end your whole career and prevent you from teaching. This is not about you creating a fuss, but protecting your interests and that of the children you are teaching - in that they deserve teachers who are trained to teach that subject not just any old thing.
    Speak to your induction mentor and politely point out the section in the guidance (p.9) and the statement (reproduced above) and ask that they, on your behalf, intervene and sort out the problem. There is a whole section of the NQT guidance (p.9 again) about the responsibility the headteacher has to protect you during induction:
    "The headteacher/principal of the institution in which an NQT is serving an induction period and the Appropriate Body are jointly responsible for the supervision and training to meet the development needs of the NQT. The duties assigned to the NQT and the conditions under which he or she works should be such as to facilitate a fair and effective assessment of the NQT&rsquo;s conduct and efficiency as a teacher."
    Ultimately if the induction mentor and/or Head refuse to meet their statutory (legal) obligations then you or your union rep can go directly to the Local Authority person who is responsible for induction and ask them to intervene. the LA has authority over the school to ensure that it conducts induction corrctly and properly.
    The get out clause for some schols is the word 'normally' so,if a NQT and school agree a timetable of teaching outside the area/age range in which they have been trained it is permissable, but only with informed consent. This allows, for example, a KS2 person to understake induction at KS1 or someone who trained in physics to teach maths for example. In these cases, the full induction standards apply and there is no concession for the fact that a person is not trained at that key stage or age range.
    James
     
  10. bluesgreens

    bluesgreens New commenter

    I'm curious about my own situation now as a lot of this seems to relate to secondary.

    I'm a primary NQT and I teach KS2. I am expected after half term to teach a modern foreign language. The language the school has chosen for me to teach is one that I have not studied (in my own schooling, I studied two other languages) at all and have no idea how to start. I can't even pronounce the words. I have told my mentor that I have real concerns but have basically been told not to worry as they have purchased a scheme of work and I can just follow that. Based on the NQT guidance, where do I stand?
     
  11. I do think the situation as per subjects taught in primary is rather different as we are expected to teach ALL subjects, not just those we are qualified or feel comfortable in ( although I too would feel rather lost teaching many foreign languages, it is something that many schools are having to come to terms with as MFL becomes compulsory) In primary the guidance tends to be used to mean we should not teach well outside the area we are trained for ( ie EY trained teaching yr 6) or being placed in particularly challenging classes. But even the former may be questionable, should an EY trained teacher be asked to teach Yr1, should a KS2 specialist teach yr 2, where do you draw the line?
     
  12. bluesgreens

    bluesgreens New commenter

    Thanks Jackie, I had suspected as much. I'm just not looking forward to all the extra hours of preparation learning the language before I can teach it!
     
  13. Currently we teach German as that is a common first language in local secondaries, but as one of the secondary schools we feed into has begun compulsory Mandarin in Yr 7 , I'm waiting to be told that we need to teach it instead [​IMG] Now that would be a challenge!
     
  14. Hi, I recognise that this post is old but I am struggling to find the
    relevant advice.

    I am an NQT employed by a secondary school as a cover teacher.
    This was agreed that the majority of the year would be teaching my
    own subject as there are several maternity covers in the department.

    Due to unforeseen circumstances, one of the permanent teacher is returning
    to her post. I have been told to choose one permanent class of my own and
    the rest of my timetable- 17 hours- will be used for cover.

    As I will be in my final term and this is the term that must be
    completed successfully (I have passed my first term even though I have
    the majority of challenging classes) I am naturally worried that the the percentage
    of my timetable will be limiting for me to pass the final term.

    Apologies for the lengthy post but my union rep' is unclear on the legalities of this.
     
  15. I can only say, don't do it! I taught out of my subject. Was overburdened, over worked, couldn't cope and now I'm out of work, I left my school last May after two terms because it all came tumbling down, as I couldn't cope.

    I only had one term signed off and now I'm finding it extremely difficult being asked back for an interview, let alone getting another job.

    Don't be afraid to say no!
     

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