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Teaching in the United States

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by lucy.toffel, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. My boyfriend is thinking of relocating to Chicago and I am not sure if I will be able to teach out there. I was told that in order to teach in USA you need to have a masters, is this true? I have fist class honours degree and P.G.C.E and have been teaching in a top independent preparatory school for the last 5 years. Can anyone offer me some advice in looking for work? Thanks
     
  2. My boyfriend is thinking of relocating to Chicago and I am not sure if I will be able to teach out there. I was told that in order to teach in USA you need to have a masters, is this true? I have fist class honours degree and P.G.C.E and have been teaching in a top independent preparatory school for the last 5 years. Can anyone offer me some advice in looking for work? Thanks
     
  3. Individual states are responsible for teacher certification so you'll need to contact the Illinois State Board of Education to find out more on transfering your qualifications to their state's teaching certificate. In the USA, teachers often have a "masters" degree, but this is really just in name only. Usually it's a one-year, post-degree, Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. This is similar to the teaching qualifications needed in other countries around the world, only they don't use the "masters" title.
     
  4. I have never heard of a state in which a masters degree is required in order to teach. The standard requirement is a bachelor's degree. In fact, public schools would often rather not hire a candidate with a master's degree if they can hire one without because they have to pay the teacher with a master's degree more according to most collective bargaining agreements/pay schedules.

    This is a difficult time to get a teaching job in most places in America. But you might want to contact the Chicago area school districts and see if they are hiring under h-1b or j-1 visas. If they are, they can get you a conditional teaching certificate while you pass your tests or do whatever else you have to do. But even districts who commonly hire this way often go through particular recruiting agencies and generally hire from only specific countries. Not infrequently, district personnel get all expense paid trips to those countries and are put up in 5 star hotels by the recruiting agency they use. Can you offer that? Also, teachers have been laid off in most places so many districts have a surplus of certified teachers and are less willing to hire one's who are not. The odds are probably not in your favor but you can check and see. The easiest chance will be to work at a private school where you do not have to have any certifications. But be aware that changes are in the works with regards to workers having to have health insurance. Nobody can say with certainty what will happen with that, but early indications are that it is going to cost most people a large percentage of their earnings--likely at least 10% of your earnings with a large copay. With the low pay private school teachers usually receive and the taxes already removed from your pay, this will not leave you much to live on. You will feel that you are working for free maybe.
     
  5. You could try the British American School of Chicago. They are part of a group of schools in the US that mostly recruit teachers from the UK. They advertise on their website (a quick google would find it), and on the TES. As for American schools, I don't believe you need a Masters degree. I'm not sure exactly how you go about applying for a job with them - but I do know of someone who is British and managed to find a US school to work in. She was already living out there - but current visa was about to run out. She saw job advertised on school's website, applied, interviewed, and was offered the job. School were happy to sponsor her visa, though I think the money it cost them is partly being recouped from her pay check. Let me know if I can be of any further help.
     
  6. Try searching for this in the overseas forum: " Teaching mathematics abroad - specifically America".
    The links given are useful regardless of subject or stage.
     

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