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Teaching in New Zealand/Canada?

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by berecs, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. berecs

    berecs New commenter

    Hi!
    I'm currently in my probation year in Scotland. I teach primary. I have been thinking about teaching abroad for a wee while (I taught English in Spain previously). I am wondering if anyone can give me any advice about teaching in either New Zealand or Canada? I understand that the demand for primary teachers has fallen in New Zealand. Has anyone gone through the process of teaching in either of these countries? I'd love to hear any information or advice! Thank you!! [​IMG]

     
  2. berecs

    berecs New commenter

    Hi!
    I'm currently in my probation year in Scotland. I teach primary. I have been thinking about teaching abroad for a wee while (I taught English in Spain previously). I am wondering if anyone can give me any advice about teaching in either New Zealand or Canada? I understand that the demand for primary teachers has fallen in New Zealand. Has anyone gone through the process of teaching in either of these countries? I'd love to hear any information or advice! Thank you!! [​IMG]

     
  3. v12

    v12

    When we were investigating moving to Canada to teach, that was the one profession that would guarantee us NOT getting a visa.
    I think they had a glut of teachers compared to a falling population at the time.
     
  4. berecs

    berecs New commenter

    Thanks for the information! I've looked into a few places to teach, and just fancied these two. However, it looks like the situation there isn't any better than here! Oh well, onto plan B...!
     
  5. polly.glot

    polly.glot New commenter

    Have you looked into teaching in private schools? The school where I work is very keen on UK teachers, as we teach to the Cambridge International exams, and knowledge of the British system is a positive advantage. And don't be discouraged by the alleged lower salaries. Private schools pay pretty much the same as UK - around £38K at the top of the scale with no responsibility points. To be frank, I am so much happier here than in the UK system.
     
  6. But private schools would need to get any UK teacher a work visa. I don't know how easy that would be, in the present climate. In addition, OP is a primary teacher, and presumably trained in the Scottish system. Therefore I doubt that what you've said applies.
    Actually, private schools only pay 3% above state rates. Therefore if you're at the stop of the scale in a private school, you'd be top of the scale in the state system. For primary, that's $70877 (state) compared to approx. $73000 (private). That's a difference of about 1100GBP per annum.
     
  7. polly.glot

    polly.glot New commenter

    I earn more than that........
     
  8. But you're not primary, are you?
    Usually the two earn the same, but this time around the primary teachers' union didn't wait for the secondary union to complete their (protracted) pay talks. Result: primary teachers will earn less for the next couple of years.
     
  9. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    Bit of an over simplification there. It is complicated* but we all went up a pay grade to reflect the fact that most Primary teachers do a three year degree and Secondary teachers do a degree then a Post Grad, and so start working a year later, and we got another grade stapled on top.
    My understanding* is that the NZEI has a deal whereby they agree not to strike, and in return any deal the PPTA get, the NZEI also get. So, if PPTA negotiated a 5% pay ride,the NZEI get that too, without any effort. Scabs.
    The government's starting position was 'No more money for anyone, so don't even bother asking..' What eventually happened was that Secondary teachers get an additional step on the scale, and that instead of a % increase, we all went up a grade. This meant the NZEI got *** all, and we got more money*. And the government saved money as they didn't have to give the NZEI anything. Next negotiation rounds are 2013 I think.
    Ah, collective agreements, don't you just love'em?

    * And a little sneaky.
    * My grasp of salary and fiscal stuff is limited to 'Money come in, money go out.. '
    * For what it is worth, I voted to reject the offer and continue with industrial action. Mostly 'cos industrial action in this instance was no directed time after 4.30, so no parents evening, no boring meetings and no pointless call back days... I was massively outnumbered. Scabs.
     
  10. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    A word rhyming with 'rugger' and starting with a 'b' gets asterisked? ***. That'll confuse the footnotes thing.
     
  11. berecs

    berecs New commenter

    Hi,
    I hadn't thought of private schools. I will look into that though, thank you. Yes, I have trained in the Scottish system, but I've heard (from reliable sources!) that other countries like that we do a probation year, where we are continuosly monitored. Yes, it might be a different education system, but no matter where I go I'll be faced with that.
    The information on pay and what's currently happening in education is interesting!
     
  12. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    If you can get documentary evidence (a letter, printed on a school letterhead..) outlining your probationary programme and what it netailed, it may mean you don't have to spend two years a a provisionally registered teacher and instead only spend one year PRT. Interestingly, salary is decided according to verifiable work experience, not registration status. Except for HPSTA which is determined by registration status.
    Anyway. Look for jobs on the Education Gazette. See what is out there and apply for the ones you like the look of. Good luck!
     
  13. The point that I was trying to make is that basically, none of what polly glot said applied to your situation. I was talking to a woman who ran the main relief (supply) agency recently and the main points boil down to this:
    1) The govt got rid of 1000 teaching positions this year.
    2) Many NZ teachers who were overseas have come home due to the GFC.
    3) Many teachers who were at home with young children are now needed by their families to bring in an income.
    Result: Lots of teachers looking for work and fewer jobs. Hence schools do not need to jump through hoops employing overseas teachers to flll their vacancies.

    Polly was talking about the fact that a number of secondary schools (Y9-13) offer English qualifications rather than the local ones, so for them there is an advantage to employing English-trained teachers. Not so in primary, where the job ads are all currently stating that they require current NZ registration. Private school herehave the same requirements vis a vis registration/qualifications as state schools do.

    Mr Swallow: Yes, it was an oversimplification. I was simply trying to make the points, (succinctly), that pay parity had been reached some time ago yet currently, primary and secondary were earning differently.
    Yes, the current situation sucks. When I was teaching in secondary, I refused to have anything to do with the PPTA as I hated the divisive way (us against them) way they go about things. Having taught in both, I feel that primary teachers actually have a higher workload. And the 'go up a grade due to higher qualifications' is an utterly bastardish tactic given that when you first enter teaching, you enter the scale according to your qualifications. So as it stood, those teacher were already a step higher than their primary counterparts. And many primary teachers are like me, and have exactly the same qualifications as primary teachers. Yet I got screwed out of a payrise for three years.
     
  14. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    The way it was explained to me (and the other members of the PPTA at the PUM) was that it was less due to 'higher qualifications' and more due to the fact that most Primary teachers do a BEd, which is usually a three year course, whereas most Secondary teachers do a BA/ Sc then do a PGDE, which takes four years, so the majority of Primary teachers get on the ladder a year ahead of their Secondary collegues and have a year earning, whilst we get a year deeper in debt and are not earning. Also, the 'go up a pay grade, get an extra grade' thing was more a dig at the NZEI for agreeing not to strike, but piggyback on PPTA negotiations. (Incidentally, the higher starting grade due to a higher qualification (G3+ ?) takes about 10 years plus (apparently..) to catch up to Primary). As mentioned this was at a PPTA PUM so they may have been a little biased.
    When I said it was complicated...
    And anyway wait until this 'payment by results' that the Nats are muttering about kicks in...
     
  15. toxy

    toxy New commenter

    There is work teaching in Canada, primarily in remote and difficult placements -- in the north, for example.Most 'easier' or more 'desirable' locales have highly bureaucratic hiring processes; eligibility as a candidate is often based on experience within a jurisdiction, making it virtually impossible to walk into a position without first logging quite a lot of time as supply (or stumbling into a lucky situation). Despite my four years of full-time employment here in England combined with my Canadian teaching degree/licence, my only hiring advantage is over a new graduate.
    With a British partner who is also a teacher, it doesn't look like I'll be moving back to Canada in a hurry.
     
  16. I'd never thought about it that way. On the surface it sounds logical. But two 'buts' spring to mind. 1) Knowing that, they chose secondary so knew what they were getting into and then decided to move the goal posts in their favour, 2) It conveniently ignores the primary teachers with 4 (or more) -year qualifications.
    Actually, in this round, the NZEI rather made martyrs of themselves. By settling first, they cleared the way for the PPTA to get more money. Of course the govt can agree to giving the PPTA a sneaky rise when they know they don't have to give it to the NZEI, too. So stupid. I don't know why they don't just join forces and be a force to be reckoned with when negotiating.
     
  17. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    Well, you'd think. Apparently not though. Still, back to the OP. There are some jobs about, but...
     
  18. berecs

    berecs New commenter

    Thanks everyone. It's really helpful to get people's opinions/experiences. It sounds a bit like the situation is the same in a lot of places. After some more research, and some positive developments in teaching jobs in other countries, I think I'll leave Canada and NZ for the time being. Thanks again, and here's hoping the situation improves!!! [​IMG]
     

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