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Teaching in international schools

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by TheoGriff, Jul 5, 2011.

  1. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Thanks for this, Hippo, a good post.
    (But probably not for NQTs not yet done induction).
    _____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Workshops. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
     
  2. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    In an ideal world, TheoGriff, I would definitely agree with you that all NQTs really ought to get their "induction year" done and dusted before they even think of moving on and teaching in an international school. The bad news is that we are in a world that is far from ideal, as many posts on this forum (and on the NQT forum) bear witness.
    As you probably know, I have been out of the UK since 1998 and so I do not have much first-hand knowledge of what is going on at the moment. However, when my school in Doha took on some NQTs at the start of this academic year, I asked them, "Why aren't you back in the UK, doing your induction year?" Their reply was simple: "Because there are no jobs." (Well, I am sure that there are SOME jobs, but there are just too many teachers chasing them. Most of our NQTs have come from Scotland, where the situation seems to be particularly bad.)
    Anyway, reading through some of the postings on this forum and on the "NQT forum" is pretty depressing. It seems that NQTs want to get on and finish their induction year, but many of them end up unemployed or scratching around for supply and maternity cover. I read one heart-rending post from an NQT who had been given a very disruptive class that was notorious all through the school. So much for effective support and mentoring! I have also heard rumours that even getting supply work is becoming more and more difficult in some areas of the UK.
    So yes, in an ideal world NQTs should not apply for international jobs. I can't argue with that. If you have not done your induction year, then there may well be some difficulties if you were to accept an international job and then decide that you wanted to return and teach in the UK. It is also probably true to say that the best international schools can be very choosy and so they are unlikely to offer a job to an NQT anyway. There are some pretty dodgy "international schools", it has to be said, but then again I dare say that some schools in the UK are not quite so wonderful!
    Yes, it is true that in an international school an NQT will most probably be expected to "just get on with it", as you will be in at the deep end, without any extra support or special guidance and no reduced timetable. On the other hand, I have known key stage co-ordinators in international schools to go out of their way to help NQTs and expat teachers tend to be a friendly and helpful bunch. In some ways, starting in an international school could be less stressful and difficult than in many schools in the UK. For example, I am currently teaching at a school in Doha and the children in my class regularly buzz off for Islamic Studies and Arabic, so I actually get more free lessons than I would if I were teaching in the UK. The school day also ends at one o'clock. (I am sure that lots of teachers could soon adjust to that.)
    If I were an NQT and I had already applied to lots of different schools in the UK, been rejected again and again and still did not have a job for September, what would I do? Hope that some supply work comes my way or just pray that I will get a permanent job, sooner or later? I just don't know, but a job in an international school might be a lot better than being unemployed.
    No, I do not work for a recruitment agency for international schools, but I do feel that it would be wrong to keep quiet when so many young teachers in the UK are disillusioned and in despair. More and more British-style schools are opening: in China, Latin America, Europe, Asia, everywhere. (A friend of mine is off to teach at a school in Kazakstan next term.) In the words of that kitchy song, "There's a whole new world..."
     
  3. Hi,
    I am currently doing some research into teaching abroad (sept 2012) and fell upon this post which i think is great, very inspiring and encouraging! I have been teaching science for three years now, have had a couple of promotions within my department and will be second in department come sept. I am very ambitious and want ot keep working my way up however, i have always wanted to work abroad and feel like there is no better time. I dont want to get too high up the career ladder without having had the expereience of teaching abroad.

    Am i starting to look into this early enough for moving next summer to start teaching sept 2012? I have had a look at international job fairs which look great but very intense and as they run over week days i am not sure i would be able to get time off to attend them. Is it possible to get a teaching job abroad that comes with the equivlalent of a TLR or some kind of responsibility? Or is it more likely that you start as a teacher and like here work your way up? I also worked in canada for a couple of months (nothing to do with teaching) and loved the country so woudl really like to go back. Do you know anything about teaching there? It seems to be quite hard to find out much information, i think they have a pretty complicated system in place.

    Thanks for any help and thanks for your original post!
     
  4. About working in Canada.... I am a Canadian primary teacher (UK trained)
    working in London. The reason I trained in the UK and am now in my
    fifth year at a London school is because there are NO teaching jobs in
    Canada. My brother is a secondary teacher and was actually laid off
    because he was the last teacher hired and they had to cut staff so he
    was out the door. That was two years ago and he can't even get on the
    supply list of his local education authority because there are too many
    teachers on the list so he can't even get his name on it!! (He's now a
    very happy stay at home dad so it's not a total sob story!) Most
    Canadian teachers now have to do years of supply or Longterm/Occassional
    (LTO) work before they will get hired on, so I might reconsider Canada
    has a teaching destination. Great place to visit though! Good luck with
    whatever you try!
     
  5. Because I'm an NQT and my partner is very happy with his job here in the UK.
    There are lots of reasons why people can't, or wouldn't want to, teach in an international school.
     
  6. This is an excellent thread. Thanks Hippo.

    I'm hoping to have the opportunity of working in a school abroad at some point in my life time, even if it is only for a year or something, I'd love to have the life experience of living in another country. Particularly interested in the middle east, Oman, such a naturally beautiful country.
     
  7. wrldtrvlr123

    wrldtrvlr123 Occasional commenter

    Hi. I just wanted to second the Hippo's sentiments. I am an SEN teacher by trade and have taught in Egypt, Japan and now, China. It can be a great life, and is not without it's financial rewards. In China for instance, salaries of £30k with adequate to generous housing allowance, tuition for dependents, yearly flights, and 10% annual gratuity are not unheard of. Teaching couples do even better.
    Working conditions vary wildly, but that can be said about many UK schools as well.
    That said, it is not for everyone and never forget that you are being rewarded for living and working in a country this is not your own and where English may or may not be widely understood. There are many dodgy schools and you certainly need to do your research before jumping in.
    If you are open to change and a bit of an adventure, do give teaching overseas some serious consideration.
     
  8. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    I'm hoping to get a job teaching in New South Wales, Aus when we go next month. I am worried at how much the curriculum might differ, I don't know if its just a lack of confidence thing from being out of the classroom a while but I'm worrying I don't know enough! How have other people found it? x
     
  9. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    The best place to post to get an answer to this type of question is the Teaching Overseas question.
    In fact, if you go there and surf around a bit, you may not even need to post - there may well be threads telling you all about it!
    Best wishes
    _____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
    I am timetabled for the October seminars - see you there!
     
  10. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    Thatnks Theo, I've already been over there and seen some really helpful bits. Been asking people in the D&T forum for subject specifics but don't seem to be any Aussies about there! x
     
  11. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    It sounds a great place to live and work, I hope you get what you want.
    <h4 id="title_div6169365511" class="insitu-trigger"> _____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
    I am timetabled for the October seminars - see you there!
    </h4>
     
  12. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Contact Julia on advice@tes.co.uk She will suggest some help that TES can provide - but at a price I'm afraid!
    Best wishes
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
     

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